Council on Council on Science and Technology

Faculty

  • Director

    • Naomi E. Leonard
  • Executive Committee

    • Maria E. Garlock
    • Michael D. Gordin
    • Brian Herrera
    • Naomi Leonard
    • Daniel R. Marlow
    • Forrest Meggers
    • Mala Murthy
    • Corina E. Tarnita
    • Daniel L. Trueman
  • Sits with Committee

    • Aatish Bhatia
    • Paul Durst
    • Catherine Riihimaki

Program Information

The Council on Science and Technology (CST) provides opportunities for every Princeton student, regardless of their concentration, to understand, experience, and appreciate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).  To accomplish this, the CST develops vibrant, interdisciplinary partnerships with colleagues from engineering, mathematics, natural sciences, the arts, humanities, and social sciences that explore and promote understanding of the interrelationship between STEM, culture, and society.  From innovative courses to original and avant-garde events, as well as “serious play” in a welcoming, state-of -the-art StudioLab, the CST’s synergistic activities ensure that every student, regardless of their prior experience or areas of primary interest, can make meaningful and lasting connections to STEM.  A small sampling of some of the CST’s recent activities can be found on our website

All students are welcome and encouraged to engage with the CST through the opportunities listed below: 

Academic Opportunities in Interdisciplinary STEM 

CST Courses: The CST encourages and facilitates the development of innovative, high-quality courses with minimal prerequisites through which undergraduates can satisfy the University’s Science and Technology (STL and STN) distribution requirement.  A plethora of courses such as, “Musical Instruments, Sound, Perception, and Creativity,” “Transformations in Engineering and the Arts,” “Forensic Anthropology and Urban Bodies,” and “Transformative Questions in Biology” provides countless opportunities for students to immerse themselves in high quality STEM learning accessible to all students. CST cross-listed STL and STN courses are listed on the CST website.

Co-Curricular Opportunities in Interdisciplinary STEM

The StudioLab 

The CST offers workshops and open hours in the StudioLab, a safe and welcoming space for creating and collaborating. Housing an array of cutting-edge tools such as virtual reality headsets, motion capture equipment, laser cutters, theater lights, 3D printers and more, the StudioLab transcends conventional makerspaces by creating a community of interdisciplinary thinkers, artists, and doers who learn through “serious play” in a supportive environment specifically designed to engage all students, regardless of their level of experience.  All students are encouraged to come to the StudioLab and allow their creativity and technical skills to flourish.  

Interdisciplinary Events and Activities

The CST hosts numerous events for students as well as faculty to discuss shared interests across disciplines. The Council's Evnin Lecture series features prominent scientists, engineers, mathematicians, and artists who engage a wide audience both inside and outside the University community. The CST also awards the Pope Prize for Science Writing to a graduating senior who has shown a keen interest in science and demonstrated an outstanding ability to communicate that enthusiasm to a wide audience.  Additionally, the CST hosts a biennial Living at the Intersection Symposium that examines a topic through interdisciplinary lenses. This year’s topic is Truth and Evidence. 

Leadership, Research, and Funding Opportunities in Interdisciplinary STEM

Student Leadership: The CST is committed to providing Princeton students with opportunities to become leaders in STEM and beyond.  To that end, the CST welcomes students to serve as StudioLab Ambassadors, CST Communication Fellows, or Work Study students. In each of these capacities, students can support the work of the CST while gaining valuable experience in areas such as workshop design and implementation, event planning and marketing, and social media outreach. New this year, the CST is also seeking students to serve on a Student Executive Committee which will provide ideas, guidance, and feedback to CST leadership.  Students interested in any of these opportunities should contact Joe Capizzi, CST program coordinator, at capizzi@princeton.edu

Student Funding and Research: CST provides SAFE funding for students to support research or projects that align with the CST’s mission. The CST also has opportunities for students to work on projects with CST’s multifaceted and accomplished staff. Students interested in any of these opportunities should contact Joe Capizzi, CST program coordinator, at capizzi@princeton.edu.

Students interested in learning more about any of these opportunities can follow CST via its website or via social media (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter)

Courses

STC 101 From DNA to Human Complexity (See MOL 101)

STC 102 Neuroscience and Everyday Life (See NEU 101)

STC 102A Climate: Past, Present, and Future (See GEO 102A)

STC 102B Climate: Past, Present, and Future (See GEO 102B)

STC 115A Physics for Future Leaders (See PHY 115A)

STC 115B Physics for Future Leaders (See PHY 115B)

STC 201A Fundamentals of Environmental Studies: Population, Land Use, Biodiversity, and Energy (See ENV 201A)

STC 201B Fundamentals of Environmental Studies: Population, Land Use, Biodiversity, and Energy (See ENV 201B)

STC 204A Musical Instruments, Sound, Perception, and Creativity (also
MUS 204A
) Fall LA

Musical instruments reside at the intersection of varied topics: sound, perception, embodiment, music theory, social values, and more; how has their design influenced the development of music and how might they be reinvented to spur new ideas? We will explore these questions through readings, listening, analysis, labs, and composition. Specific topics include: harmony and the keyboard; tuning and temperament; preparing the piano, digital and analog. More generally, we will consider the productive tension between qualitative and quantitative understandings of musical concepts. Instructed by: D. Trueman

STC 204B Musical Instruments, Sound, Perception, and Creativity (also
MUS 204B
) Fall STL

Musical instruments reside at the intersection of varied topics: sound, perception, embodiment, music theory, social values, and more; how has their design influenced the development of music and how might they be reinvented to spur new ideas? We will explore these questions through readings, listening, analysis, labs, and composition. Specific topics include: harmony and the keyboard; tuning and temperament; preparing the piano, digital and analog. More generally, we will consider the productive tension between qualitative and quantitative understandings of musical concepts. Instructed by: D. Trueman

STC 209A Transformations in Engineering and the Arts (also
EGR 209A
/
MUS 209A
) Spring LA

STC209 examines transformations between visuals, sound, structure, and movement. This course explores the notion of generative art, and investigates the parallels between design processes in engineering and the arts. Students learn to work as artists and engineers, and create ambitious open-ended design projects exploring these themes. Transformations in Engineering and the Arts is taught by faculty from CST, COS, MAE, MUS, CEE along with visiting artists, and guest faculty from the Lewis Center for the Arts. Instructed by: N. Leonard, S. Adriaenssens, M. Garlock

STC 209B Transformations in Engineering and the Arts (also
EGR 209B
/
MUS 209B
) Spring STL

STC209 examines transformations between visuals, sound, structure, and movement. This course explores the notion of generative art, and investigates the parallels between design processes in engineering and the arts. Students learn to work as artists and engineers, and create ambitious open-ended design projects exploring these themes. Transformations in Engineering and the Arts is taught by faculty from CST, COS, MAE, MUS, CEE along with visiting artists, and guest faculty from the Lewis Center for the Arts. Instructed by: N. Leonard, S. Adriaenssens, M. Garlock

STC 210A Storytelling with Technology for Performance (See THR 210A)

STC 210B Storytelling with Technology for Performance (See THR 210B)

STC 297 Transformative Questions in Biology (also
HIS 297
/
MOL 297
/
HUM 297
) Fall STN

The course will teach core principles of the life sciences through a set of key questions that biologists have sought to answer over the past 200 years. We will read historic scientific publications, discussing the basic biology at stake as well as what enabled each scientist to see something new. In addition, we will schedule several hands-on sessions with relevant materials. By situating key findings in their place and time we show how science is an inquiry-based, concrete, and ongoing activity, rather than codified and unchanging knowledge. Topics include cell theory, evolution, experimental embryology, genetics, and molecular development. Instructed by: A. Creager, M. Levine

STC 309 Independent Design in Engineering and the Arts Spring

STC 309, also known as ¿Creative Kitchen," is a forum for students to explore and intensively workshop an idea for an independent, creative, technology-related project through serious play. Serious play refers to an array of playful inquiry and innovation methods that serve as methods for problem-solving, creation, and exploration. Serious play methods include, but are not limited to: improv theater, low-fidelity rapid prototyping, gamification, and audience engagement. In this course we will question the presentation of narrative, discover how to use methods of serious play in order to explore ideas, and examine projects in storytelling. Instructed by: D. Bengali

STC 349 Writing about Science (also
ENV 349
/
JRN 349
) Not offered this year STN

This course will teach STEM & non-STEM majors how to write about research in STEM fields with clarity and a bit of flair. Goal will be to learn to convey technical topics to non-experts in a compelling, enjoyable way while staying true to the underlying facts, context and concepts. We'll do this through readings, class discussion, encounters with professional writers and journalists of all sorts, across several different media. Most important of all, students will practice what they learn in frequent writing assignments that will be critiqued extensively by an experienced science journalist. Instructed by: M. Lemonick

STC 391 History of Contemporary Science (See HIS 391)

STC 398 Health and Human Rights in the World Community Not offered this year SA

This seminar will examine the relationship between health and human rights. It will provide an overview of human rights violations in the world today and an analysis of their health consequences. The course will consider how individual and community health can be improved by protecting and promoting human rights. It will also evaluate the role of health professionals in caring for victims of human rights abuses, documenting the health consequences of human rights violations, and participating in human rights advocacy and education. One three-hour seminar. Instructed by: A. Keller

STC 460 Diseases in Children: Causes, Costs, and Choices (See MOL 460)