Department of East Asian Studies

  • Chair

    Martin Kern

  • Departmental Representative

    Franz Prichard

  • Director of Graduate Studies

    Thomas D. Conlan

  • Professor

    Chih-p'ing Chou

    Thomas D. Conlan, also History

    Sheldon M. Garon, also History

    Martin Kern

    Willard J. Peterson, also History

    Anna M. Shields

  • Visiting Professor

    Shinji Yoshikawa

  • Associate Professor

    Amy B. Borovoy

    Janet Y. Chen, also History

    Steven Chung

    Pieter Christian Aize Keulemans

    Federico Marcon, also History

    Atsuko Ueda

  • Assistant Professor

    He Bian, also History

    Ksenia Chizhova

    Erin Yu-Tien Huang, also Comparative Literature

    Franz K. Prichard

    Brian R. Steininger

    Xin Wen, also History

     

     

  • Senior Lecturer

    Shinji Sato

    Jing Wang

  • Lecturer

    Ho Jung Choi

    Qifan Ding

    Shutan Dong

    Wei Gong

    Luanfeng Huang

    Eunjung Ji

    Yike Li

    Ning Liu

    Xiang Lu

    Hisae Matsui

    Keiko Ono

    Christopher Schad

    Tomoko Shibata

    Yukari Tokumasu

    Tingting Wang

    Ding Wang-Bramlett

    Jing Xie

    Jae Rim Yoon

    Yuseon Yun

    Xin Zou

  • Associated Faculty

    Thomas J. Christensen, Woodrow Wilson School, Politics

    Christina Davis, Woodrow Wilson School, Politics

    Thomas W. Hare, Comparative Literature

    Jacqueline I. Stone, Religion

    Stephen F. Teiser, Religion

    Rory Truex, Politics

    Cheng-hua Wang, Art and Archaeology

    Andrew M. Watsky, Art and Archaeology

    Yu Xie, Sociology

The Department of East Asian Studies (EAS) provides undergraduate concentrators with a broad-ranging knowledge of the languages and cultures of China, Japan, and Korea.

Information and Departmental Plan of Study

Concentrators are required to achieve proficiency in one East Asian language through the third-year level, and take eight departmental courses. The departmentals must include the junior seminar (EAS 300), at least two of the five courses HIS/EAS 207-208, HUM/EAS/COM 233-234, or EAS 229, and at least one course on pre-modern Asia. A single course may not be used to satisfy two requirements, with the exception of HIS 207 and HUM 233, either of which may be used to satisfy the requirement of a course on premodern Asia. A minimum of six of the eight departmentals must be EAS-prefixed courses. The remaining two may be language-courses at or above the 300 level (after the three-year proficiency requirement is fulfilled), or any language courses in a second East Asian language.

Advanced Placement

Students seeking advanced placement should consult the departmental representative.

Prerequisites

1. One year of language study in one East Asian language

2. One 200-level EAS course

Early Concentration

Students who meet the prerequisites for entrance into the department may be admitted and begin their Studies as EAS concentrators in the second term of their sophomore year.

General Requirements

I. Language Proficiency
Language proficiency through the third year in one East Asian language.

II. Departmental Courses
Eight departmental courses (“departmentals”) fulfilling the following requirements:

  1. Six EAS-prefix courses, which must include
    a) The Junior Seminar (EAS 300) as an introductory methods survey course, generally taken fall of the junior year
    b) Two of the following transnational courses:
        -History of East Asia to 1800 (HIS/EAS 207)
        -East Asia since 1800 (HIS/EAS 208)
        -Contemporary East Asia (EAS 229)
        -East Asian Humanities I: The Classical Foundations (HUM/EAS/COM 233)
        -East Asian Humanities II: Tradition and Transformations (HUM/EAS/COM 234)
    c) At least one course on pre-modern East Asia
    Note: Either HIS 207 or HUM 233, when taken in fulfillment of (b), may also be used simultaneously towards requirement (c), however the course will only count towards one of the six required EAS-prefix departmentals.
  2. Two additional courses, which may be
       -EAS courses including courses cross-listed with EAS
       -Cognate courses approved by the Departmental Representative
       -Language courses at or above the 300 level (after the three-year proficiency requirement is fulfilled)
       -Any second East Asian language courses

Independent Work

Junior Year. In the fall term the student participates in the departmental junior seminar (EAS 300), and also writes a junior independent work. In the spring, the student writes a second junior independent work under the supervision of an appropriate faculty member. At the end of the junior year, the student begins to draft a proposal for the senior thesis.

Senior Year. Each student prepares a senior thesis in consultation with an appropriate member of the faculty. The senior thesis represents the culmination of the undergraduate curriculum. It should be an original contribution to scholarship on East Asia, based at least in part on source materials in the student's language of specialization.

Senior Departmental Examination

At the end of the spring term, the student appears before a faculty committee for an oral defense of the thesis. In addition, each senior will take written comprehensive examinations in two fields selected from the core areas of history, literature, culture, and society taught in the department. If the two fields concern the same country, one must be premodern and one modern. Sample questions will be provided.

Study Abroad

The Department of East Asian Studies offers varied opportunities for overseas study in East Asia. Concentrators, certificate students, and non-concentrators are encouraged to take advantage of intensive summer or year-long language study and/or internships. The programs hosted by East Asian studies are the intensive Chinese and Japanese language programs in Beijing, China, and Kanazawa, Japan. Upon graduation, students will normally find themselves prepared to begin graduate work at a higher level because of such foreign language experience and training. The department also encourages students to participate in extended internships or study programs in East Asia.

Scholarship aid is available to concentrators and non-concentrators for both summer and year-long programs. Students should contact the East Asian studies program office for these funding opportunities. Students should also contact the Office of International Programs about other sources of funding. Application deadlines are early in the academic year. More information is available from the directors of the Chinese, Japanese, and Korean language programs, or from the Department of East Asian Studies website.

Certificate in Language and Culture

1. Seven language courses, three or more of which must be beyond the second-year level.
2. At least one EAS or cognate course in linguistics, religion, history, or anthropology.
3. Independent research (20 to 25 pages) based at least in part on Chinese, Japanese, or Korean sources dealing with aspects of East Asia. The topic must be in the humanities or social sciences. The paper could be either an original piece of research or a junior paper or senior thesis. If the paper or thesis is written for another department, at least half of the work must be on East Asia.

EAS Program Certificate

1. Two years (four courses) of study of Chinese, Japanese, or Korean. At least two of the four courses must be at the second-year level or higher.
2. Four East Asia content courses, one of them being a 200-level course.
3. Written work, which may be a senior thesis, a junior paper, or an independent research paper with an East Asian topical component.

East Asian studies concentrators focusing on one language can earn a language and culture certificate in the other, but may not also earn an East Asian studies program certificate.

Cognates. A list of cognate courses in other departments can be found on the departmental website.

 

Courses

CHI 101 Elementary Chinese I Fall An introductory course in modern spoken and written Chinese, stressing oral-aural facility and the use of language structure for communication. Five hours of class. No credit given for CHI 101 unless followed by CHI 102. Staff
CHI 102 Elementary Chinese II Spring Continued study of modern spoken and written Chinese, stressing listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Five hours of class. Staff
CHI 103 Intensive Elementary Chinese Fall An intensive course covering 101 and 102 in one semester for beginning heritage learners and students with fair fluency and limited ability in reading and writing skills. The course will emphasize reading and writing skills. Prerequisite: instructor's permission (oral interview in Chinese). Five hours of class. Staff
CHI 105 Intermediate Chinese I Fall A study of modern spoken and written Chinese, this course shifts the emphasis to the reading of contemporary Chinese dialogue. Five hours of class. Staff
CHI 107 Intermediate Chinese II Spring Continuing the study of modern spoken and written Chinese, this course shifts the emphasis to the reading of contemporary Chinese cultural and social issues. Five hours of class. Staff
CHI 108 Intensive Intermediate Chinese Spring An intensive course that covers 105 and 107 in one semester for students who have completed 103. Conducted in Chinese, with emphasis on reading and writing. Prerequisite: 103 or instructor's permission. Five hours of class. Staff
CHI 301 Introduction to Classical Chinese I Fall HA CHI 301 not only provides basic training for students in classical Chinese, but also introduces students to theme-based readings about important cultural aspects of pre-modern China, such as the concept of Dao, life and death, etc. Each theme is consisted of passages selected from Chinese classics and short essays or stories full of wisdom and wit from later dynasties. This course will not only improve your four skills in Chinese language but also enhance your understanding of traditional Chinese philosophy and culture in general. Three hours of classes conducted in Chinese. C. Chou
CHI 302 Introduction to Classical Chinese II Spring HA Following CHI 301, the readings for CHI 302 is also theme-based and includes more philosophical and cultural topics of pre-modern China such as debates between various philosophical schools, military and political strategies, law, etc. Three hours of classes conducted in Chinese. C. Chou
CHI 303 Third-Year Modern Chinese I Fall Designed to develop further the student's overall language skills through reading and discussion of contemporary affairs published in Chinese newspapers. Four hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite: CHI 105-107, or instructor's permission. Staff
CHI 304 Third-Year Modern Chinese II Spring A continuation of CHI 303, designed to improve the student's facility in written and oral expression through a close study of newspaper essays and commentaries. Four hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite: CHI 303 or instructor's permission. Staff
CHI 305 Intensive Third-Year Modern Chinese I Fall CHI 305 is an intensive intermediate class designed for heritage learners and students who are interested in current political and social issues in Chinese affairs. Staff
CHI 306 Intensive Third-Year Modern Chinese II Spring A continuation of 305, designed to further improve the student's facility in written and oral expression through a close study of essays published in contemporary Chinese newspapers and magazines. Four hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite: 305 or instructor's permission. Staff
CHI 401 Advanced Classical Chinese I Not offered this year LA Intensive introduction to classical Chinese through the study of selections from ancient texts. Four classes conducted in Chinese. Staff
CHI 402 Advanced Classical Chinese II Not offered this year LA Continuation of 401. Intensive introduction to classical Chinese through the study of selections from ancient texts. Four classes conducted in Chinese. Staff
CHI 403 Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I Fall Reading and discussion of selections from Chinese scholarly journals and newspapers on contemporary Chinese political, economic, and social issues. Four hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite: 304 or instructor's permission. Staff
CHI 404 Fourth-Year Modern Chinese II Spring A continuation of 403. Reading and discussion of scholarly writings in the fields of Chinese literature and modern Chinese intellectual history. Four hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite: 403, or instructor's permission. Staff
CHI 405 Intensive Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I Fall CHI 405 is an intensive advanced Chinese class designed for heritage learners. It focuses on reading and discussion based on Chinese scholarly journals, popular essays, and newspaper articles. Students are exposed to a variety of modern Chinese literary genres, as well as some of the major substantive issues that modern Chinese intellectuals have faced. Four hours of class conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite: 306 or instructor's permission. Staff
CHI 406 Intensive Fourth-Year Modern Chinese II Spring Continued reading and discussion of scholarly writings on modern Chinese literature. This course also exposes students to the social issues China has faced in recent years, while discussing various aspects of contemporary Chinese society. Four hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite: 405 or instructor's permission. Staff
EAS 207 History of East Asia to 1800 (See HIS 207)
EAS 208 East Asia since 1800 (See HIS 208)
EAS 217 The Arts of Japan (See ART 217)
EAS 221 Introduction to Modern Japanese Literature LA The course will cover major writers and works of the 20th century. We will examine how Japanese writers responded to modern fictional and linguistic forms imported from the West, how they negotiated what they had inherited from their long and illustrious literary past, and how postwar writers view their newly "democratized" world. A. Ueda
EAS 225 Japanese Society and Culture (also
ANT 323
) Fall SA
An exploration of Japanese labor, gender and feminism, crime and social control, race and notions of homogeneity, nationalism and youth culture. The course considers Japan's struggle to come to terms with the West while at the same time integrating its past. It also looks at American misperceptions of Japanese society and economics. Two lectures, one preceptorial. A. Borovoy
EAS 226 The Religions of China (See REL 226)
EAS 228 Religion in Japanese Culture (See REL 228)
EAS 231 Chinese Martial Arts Classics: Fiction, Film, Fact Not offered this year LA This course provides an overview of Chinese martial arts fiction and film from earliest times to the present day. The focus will be on the close-reading of literary, art-historical, and cinematic texts, but will also include discussion of the significance of these works against their broader historical and social background. Topics to be discussed: the literary/cinematic pleasure of watching violence, the relationship between violence and the law, gender ambiguity and the woman warrior, the imperial and (trans)national order of martial arts cinema, and the moral and physical economy of vengeance. P. Keulemans
EAS 232 Introduction to Chinese Literature Spring LA The development of classical Chinese literature, traced through close readings of original texts in English translation. Topics include the nature of the Chinese language and writing system, classical literary thought, religious and philosophical influences, dominance of poetry, emergence of historical writing, and vernacular fiction. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff
EAS 233 East Asian Humanities I: The Classical Foundations (See HUM 233)
EAS 234 East Asian Humanities II: Traditions and Transformations (See HUM 234)
EAS 240 The Perception of China and Asia in the West (also
HIS 240
) Not offered this year HA
Presents some of the major themes in the Western perception of China since 1250, from Marco Polo to Chairman Mao, and introduces students to the nature of history and historical writing. Students will be challenged to conduct their own critical historiographical analysis. Readings will focus on primary sources in translation and relevant secondary studies. Two lectures, one preceptorial. B. Elman
EAS 282 A Documents-based Approach to Asian History (See HIS 282)
EAS 300 Junior Seminar Fall Designed to introduce departmental majors, in the fall of their junior year, to the tools, methodologies, and topics related to the study of East Asian history and culture. The focus of the course will vary each year, and will be cross-national and multidisciplinary, covering both premodern and modern periods. One three-hour seminar. F. Prichard
EAS 308 Communism and Beyond: China and Russia (See SOC 308)
EAS 320 Early Japanese History (also
HIS 320
) Not offered this year HA
The history of Japan from the origins of the Japanese people to the establishment of Tokugawa rule in 1600, using the epic war tale The Tale of the Heike as a lens. Particular emphasis will be placed on institutional and cultural history. One three-hour seminar. T. Conlan
EAS 321 Early Modern Japan (also
HIS 321
) Not offered this year HA
The history of Japan during the period of Samurai rule. Distinctive features of Tokugawa society and culture from the foundation of the regime in 1600 to its decline in the 19th century, the opening of Japan to Western contact, the course of economic development, and the consolidation of the Meiji State. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff
EAS 322 Buddhism in Japan (See REL 322)
EAS 324 20th-Century Japan (See HIS 322)
EAS 333 The Chinese Novel (also
COM 333
) Not offered this year LA
Extensive readings in the six "classic'' Chinese novels: Romance of the Three Kingdoms, Water Margin, Golden Lotus, Journey to the West (Monkey), Story of the Stone (Dream of the Red Chamber), and The Scholars, in English translations. Discussions will focus on interpretive and comparative issues. One three-hour seminar. Alternates with 433. Staff
EAS 334 Modern Chinese Literature and Film Spring LA Analysis through selected literary and cinematic works of authors' ideas, hopes, and worries about the fate of modern China. Consideration of literary and cinematic technique as well as the larger historical context. Readings in English. P. Keulemans
EAS 335 Early Chinese History to 221 (also
HIS 318
) Not offered this year HA
History of China from the earliest times until the end of the first unified empire in A.D. 200. Political developments will be related to the underlying social and economic changes and the development of early systems of thought. Primary documents will be read in translation, where possible, and the results of recent archaeological discoveries will be related to the written record. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff
EAS 336 The Making and Transformation of Medieval China: 300-1200 (also
HIS 319
) Not offered this year HA
This course provides a survey of the history of China from the dissolution of the first unified empire to the eve of the Mongol invasion. Key issues include the Tang-Song transformation, influence of Buddhism and Neo-Confucianism, the rise of literati culture, the development of autocratic rulership, and commercialism. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff
EAS 340 Culture and Society in Late Imperial China: 1000-1900 (also
HIS 340
) Not offered this year HA
A survey of the major cultural and social developments from early Song to high Qing that have particular relevance for understanding China in its modern predicament. Emphasis will be placed on the interplay between ideas and society, growth of new social institutions, emergence of classical elites and religious groups. Two lectures, one preceptorial. B. Elman
EAS 341 The Tale of Genji in the World Spring LA Examination of selected literary texts from premodern and modern Japan and from contemporary Western critical writings. Topics will include modern interpretations of tradition, narrative as a mode of knowledge, translation and interpretation, and the general problems involved in the study of a non-Western literature. One three-hour seminar. Knowledge of Japanese is not required. Staff
EAS 342 Southeast Asia's Global History (See HIS 342)
EAS 343 Modern Japanese Literature: Early Years Spring LA An introduction to major literary works in the early modern period when Japanese literature was attempting to re-establish itself through Western influences. Readings in English translation include works by Ogai, Soseki, Ichiyo, Toson, and Shiga. Topics include the evolution of modern Japanese fiction vis-a-vis the modernization of Japan, representations of self, individualism, and nationalism. Staff
EAS 344 Postwar Japanese Narrative: Modern to Postmodern (also
COM 344
) LA
A critical survey of important literary, critical, and popular texts in postwar Japan. Readings and discussion of translated texts by writers and thinkers such as Kawabata, Oe, Maruyama, and Abe as well as by lesser-known women writers, avant-garde poets, and comic writers. Topics include the impact of war and urbanization, existentialism, ethnicity, postmodernism, and feminism. One three-hour seminar. Staff
EAS 345 Sexuality and Desire in Modern Japan Spring LA An examination of texts written by women in Japan during the premodern and modern periods in the context of feminist and cross-cultural criticism. The premodern period will focus on how we read products of a culture in which women had their own gendered discursive style. The modern period will focus on what happened when women found themselves negotiating a field dominated by a male- and Western-oriented writing establishment. Offered in alternate years. One three-hour seminar. Staff
EAS 346 The Chinese Economy (See ECO 379)
EAS 354 Early Modern China (See HIS 324)
EAS 355 China, 1850 to the Present (See HIS 325)
EAS 356 Chinese Cinema (See ART 350)
EAS 357 Traditional Chinese Architecture (See ART 351)
EAS 362 Chinese Politics (See POL 362)
EAS 401 Readings in Modern Japanese I (See JPN 401)
EAS 402 Readings in Modern Japanese II (See JPN 402)
EAS 405 Readings in Modern Korean l (See KOR 405)
EAS 406 Readings in Modern Korean II (See KOR 407)
EAS 411 Readings in Modern Chinese Intellectual History (See CHI 411)
EAS 412 Readings in Classic Chinese Short Stories (See CHI 412)
EAS 415 Intellectual History of China to the Fifth Century (also
HIS 415
) Fall EM
Considers the developing repertoire of ideas in China to the end of the Chin period, with key philosophical, political, ethical, and scientific concepts treated in terms of their social context and subsequent influence. One three-hour seminar. A prior course in East Asian studies is desirable but not required. W. Peterson
EAS 416 Intellectual History of China from the Ninth to the 19th Century (also
HIS 416
) Spring HA
The main facets and changes in the outlook of the intellectual elite in society and politics from the establishment of the literati in the 11th century to their survival under the Manchu conquest and incursions from Western powers. The focus is on the preservation of cultural integrity in the face of internal and external political and ideological challenges. One three-hour seminar. A prior course in East Asian studies is desirable but not required. W. Peterson
EAS 417 Modern Chinese Thought Not offered this year HA A systematic study of problems and concepts connected with the development of modern Chinese thought: antitraditionalism, the rise of Communism, the emancipation of women, the promotion of Western ideologies, and the process of modernization. Readings in English, with supplementary materials for students with reading knowledge of Chinese. One three-hour seminar. C. Chou
EAS 423 Landscape Art in China (See ART 423)
EAS 425 The Japanese Print (See ART 425)
EAS 447 Introduction to Japanese Linguistics Not offered this year SA Introduction to the theories and techniques of linguistic analysis as applied to modern Japanese, with a focus on interface between language and culture. The course examines similarities and differences between Japanese and English. Knowledge of Japanese at least to the 105 level, or concurrent enrollment, is desirable. Two 90-minute classes. Staff
EAS 462 International Relations of East Asia (See WWS 317)
EAS 470 Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities (See HUM 470)
JPN 101 Elementary Japanese I Fall An introduction to modern Japanese stressing oral-aural facility but including an introduction to written Japanese. Two classes, three hours of drill and conversation. No credit is given for JPN 101 unless followed by JPN 102. S. Sato
JPN 102 Elementary Japanese II Spring A continuation of 101. An introduction to modern Japanese still stressing oral-aural facility but including an introduction to written Japanese. Prerequisite: 101. Two classes, three hours of drill and conversation. S. Sato
JPN 105 Intermediate Japanese I Fall Continued study of modern Japanese by consistent review and reinforcement of major grammatical points and more advanced vocabulary and grammar. This course will develop conversational as well as reading and writing skills. In addition to the main textbook, audio and visual materials will also be used for aural comprehension. Prerequisite: 102 or equivalent. Five 50-minute classes. H. Matsui
JPN 107 Intermediate Japanese II Spring A continuation of 105. The course aims at a thorough mastery of modern Japanese by consistent review and reinforcement of major grammatical points covered in JPN 101, 102, and 105. Emphasis will increasingly be on reading; however oral work will still comprise fundamental aspect of the course. In addition to the main textbooks, audio and visual materials will also be used for aural comprehension. Prerequisite: 105 or equivalent. Five 50-minute classes. H. Matsui
JPN 301 Advanced Japanese I Fall Further reading in modern written Japanese with subsidiary grammatical and oral-aural training. The course covers some authentic materials and includes videotaped materials to increase oral-aural comprehension. Three 90-minute classes. Staff
JPN 302 Advanced Japanese II Spring A continuation of 301. Further reading in modern written Japanese with subsidiary grammatical and oral-aural training. The course covers some authentic materials and includes videotaped materials to increase oral-aural comprehension. Prerequisite: 301. Three 80-minute classes. C. Schad
JPN 305 Integrative Advanced Japanese I Fall Designed to enhance reading, writing, and oral skills of students who need class work to achieve proficiency. Prerequisites: 302 or its equivalent. Two 90-minute classes. T. Shibata
JPN 306 Integrative Advanced Japanese II Spring A continuation of 305. Designed to enhance reading, writing, and oral skills of students who need class work to achieve advanced proficiency level. Prerequisites: 305 or its equivalent. Three hours. T. Shibata
JPN 403 Introduction to Classical Japanese Not offered this year Introduction to the fundamentals of classic Japanese grammar. This course trains students to read premodern Japanese historical and literary texts. Texts: Taketori monogatari, Makura no soshi, Tosa nikki, etc. Prerequisite: two years of modern Japanese. Three hours. K. Ono
JPN 404 Readings in Classical Japanese Not offered this year Close reading of selected premodern Japanese texts from Nara to Meiji. Texts: Oku no hosomichi, Uji shui monogatari, etc. Prerequisite: 403 or instructor's permission. Three hours. K. Ono
JPN 405 Readings in Selected Fields I Not offered this year Designed to give students who have had advanced training in modern Japanese an opportunity for directed readings in their own fields. Three classes. Prerequisite: 402 or instructor's permission. Staff
JPN 406 Readings in Selected Fields II Not offered this year Designed to give students who have had advanced training in modern Japanese an opportunity for directed readings in their own fields. Three classes. Prerequisite: 402 or instructor's permission. Staff
KOR 101 Elementary Korean I Fall Elementary Korean is designed for beginning students who intend to build a solid foundation for further study in the Korean language. The course provides four balanced language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing - needed for basic communication. It emphasizes the ability to use Korean appropriately and introduces students to useful information concerning culture and daily life in Korea. J. Suh, Y. Yun, E. Ji
KOR 102 Elementary Korean II Spring A continuation of KOR 101. Continued development of proficiency in basic communication by balancing four language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing. J. Suh, Y. Yun, E. Ji
KOR 103 Intensive Korean I Fall The first part of Intensive Korean is designed for heritage students who have already had considerable amount of exposure to the Korean language and culture but have not received any formal instruction before their arriving at Princeton. It covers the Elementary Korean material focusing on vocabulary building, grammar, reading and writing. E. Ji
KOR 105 Intermediate Korean I Fall Intermediate Korean is designed for students who have learned the basics of the Korean language and want to improve their competence to a higher level. Complex sentences and grammar are covered while the basics are reviewed. Balancing four language skills -- listening, speaking, reading, and writing -- is emphasized. H. Choi, E. Ji
KOR 107 Intermediate Korean II Spring A continuation of KOR 105. Continued development of four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) in Korean. Complex grammatical structures and irregularities are taught while the basics are reviewed. Idiomatic expressions are introduced. Journals are kept for writing practice. H. Choi, E. Ji
KOR 301 Advanced Korean I Fall Advanced Korean is designed to develop fluency in both oral and literary skills. Expansion of vocabulary, practice in reading comprehension as well as active skills of conversation and writing are stressed through short readings and class discussion. Readings include different styles of writings on various topics including Korean culture, society, and history. H. Choi
KOR 302 Advanced Korean II Spring A continuation of KOR 301. Continued development of proficiency in speaking and reading through short readings and class discussion. Vocabulary learning and discourse skills are emphasized. H. Choi
KOR 401 Contemporary Korean Language and Culture I Fall The 4th-year language course designed to accelerate students' Korean proficiency to the high advanced level and to promote a deeper understanding of Korea and its people. A wide range of sociolinguistic and sociocultural issues are covered through the use of various media resources (e.g., dramas, films, songs, commercials, newspapers, websites) as well as short essays. Classroom discussions are conducted in Korean. Y. Yun
KOR 402 Contemporary Korean Language and Culture II Spring LA Reading and discussion of thoughts and issues related to the contemporary Korean society. Readings drawn from a variety of sociocultural and historical as well as sociolinguistic topics include family, marriage, education, technology and changes in the Korean language. Class discussions are conducted in Korean. Y. Yun