Department of English

  • Chair

    Simon Gikandi

  • Acting Chair

    Jeff Dolven

  • Associate Chair

    Gayle Salamon

  • Departmental Representative

    Tamsen O. Wolff

  • Director of Graduate Studies

    Sarah Rivett

  • Professor

    Eduardo L. Cadava

    Anne A. Cheng, also American Studies

    Andrew Cole

    Bradin Cormack

    Maria A. DiBattista, also Comparative Literature

    Jill S. Dolan, also Lewis Center for the Arts, Theater

    Jeffrey Dolven

    Diana J. Fuss

    Simon E. Gikandi

    William A Gleason

    Claudia L. Johnson

    Lee C. Mitchell

    Robert Nixon, also Princeton Environmental Institute

    Deborah E. Nord

    Jeff E. Nunokawa

    Sarah Rivett, also American Studies

    Galye Salamon, also Gender and Sexuality Studies Program

    Esther H. Schor

    D. Vance Smith

    Nigel Smith

    Susan A. Stewart

    Susan J. Wolfson

  • Visiting Lecturer

    Sharon Cameron

     

  • Associate Professor

    Zahid R. Chaudhary

    Sophie G. Gee

    Joshua I. Kotin

    Meredith Anne Martin

    Tamsen O. Wolff

  • Assistant Professor

    Sarah Chihaya

    Russell J. Leo

    Christina A. León

    Kinohi Nishikawa, also African American Studies

    Autumn M. Womack, also African American Studies

  • Lecturer

    Sarah M. Anderson

    Alfred Bendixen

    Nijah Cunningham, also Council of the Humanities and African American Studies

    Monica Huerta, also Council of the Humanities

    Natalie V. Prizel, also Council of the Humanities

    Robert N. Sandberg, Lewis Center for the Arts, Theater

  • Associated Faculty

    April Alliston, Comparative Literature

    Leonard Barkan, Comparative Literature

    Anne McClintock, Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies

     

Information and Departmental Plan of Study

In the Department of English, students read widely across the genres and periods of British, American, and Anglophone literature and explore approaches to literary study with a distinguished, internationally renowned faculty. The department's ranks include historicists and formalists, theorists and poets, and postcolonialists and feminists; the faculty teach not only poetry, prose, and drama, but film, music, art, architecture, and technology. The department is united by a passion for works of the imagination and for thinking about what they mean and the difference they make in the world.

The department offers courses that cover more than two millennia of literature and culture, in settings ranging from large lectures to small seminars to one-on-one advising. A typical program of study embraces new and experimental writing, important rediscoveries, and the most hallowed texts of the Western literary tradition, the "news that stays news." The department cultivates a common critical vocabulary and joins in debating enduring questions about art, language, and society. The junior year begins with a diverse array of junior seminars, which couple the study of a specific subject with methodological training in critical reading and writing. Juniors and seniors pursue independent work on subjects of their choosing in collaboration with the faculty, and they may elect tracks in British, American, or Anglophone literatures, arts and media, theory and criticism, creative writing, theater and performance studies, or comparative literatures. The department also encourages concentrators who wish to pursue interdisciplinary work through certificate programs.

English concentrators graduate as incisive readers, cogent thinkers, and persuasive writers. They carry with them a lasting ability to take informed pleasure in all forms of literature, in the process of writing, and in the meanings and powers of culture. Graduates go on to become leaders in such fields as education, law, medicine, journalism, business, politics, and the creative arts. Simply put, learning to read closely and write fluently--the twin pillars of the discipline--are among the most valuable skills graduates can bring to the world's work.

Prerequisites

English department prerequisites provide a background in literary history and familiarity with one of the major genres. Concentrators take both ENG 200 (British Literature from the 14th to the 18th Centuries) and one of the 200-level Reading Literature courses: ENG 205 (Poetry), ENG 206 (Fiction), ENG 207 (Drama), or ENG 208 (The Essay) or ENG 209 (Theory).

Program of Study

English concentrators must take a total of 11 courses: two 200-level prerequisites, the Junior Seminar, and eight departmental courses, seven of which must be at the 300 level or above. With the permission of the departmental representative, concentrators may count one cognate course from another department, where that course adds depth or perspective to their studies in English. (Some optional tracks may permit more cognates or specify their nature: see below.)

Distribution Requirements. Departmental distribution requirements ensure historical and generic breadth in each concentrator's program of study. Foundations (two courses in British literature before 1800, only one of which can be Shakespeare, and one course in American literature before 1900) grounds concentrators in the history of English. Modernity (one course in literature after 1800) brings them up to date. Diasporas (one course in Anglophone or U.S. minority literatures) explores the racial, cultural, and geographical diversities that inform literary tradition. Theory and Criticism (one course) provides tools for thinking critically across all these periods, identities, and genres. Each semester, the department offers a wide variety of courses in each area, and a full list is available on the department website. (By arrangement with the departmental representative, some courses may satisfy two requirements simultaneously.)

A few rules regarding departmental courses:

  • Concentrators may not pass/D/fail English courses. This includes cross-listed courses, even if English is not the home department.
  • Students who study abroad may count two courses per semester abroad toward your departmentals. The exception to this is the Junior Seminar in London: students may count two classes plus the seminar.
  • Cross-listed courses do not count against the Rule of 12 so long as the home department is not English.
  • In the Department of English, it is not permissible to drop the lowest-graded departmental course from your average.

 

Tracks
Optional tracks offer the chance for students with special interests to focus their programs of study within the discipline of English and on questions that lie between disciplines. Concentrators may elect a track at any time: a junior may already know she wants to focus on literary theory; a second-semester senior may realize he has been writing about literature and the arts all along. Some tracks, however, have more requirements than others (arts and media, theater and performance studies, and creative writing in particular), and students are advised to make a start as early as the sophomore year.

Literature, Culture, Language
Concentrators may focus on a particular national or international body of work: British, American, or Anglophone.

British
Literature and culture of the British Isles. Requirements: four courses in British literature; one junior paper and the senior thesis on a British topic. One cognate course in another department (history, art and archaeology, etc.) on a British topic may be counted.

American
Literature and culture of the territories that became the United States, from native peoples and the first European settlers to the present day. Requirements: four courses in American literature (including at least one of ENG 201, ENG 353, or ENG 366); one junior paper and the senior thesis on an American topic. One cognate course in another department (history, art and archaeology, etc.) on an American topic may be counted. This track is often combined with a certificate in American studies or African American studies.

Anglophone
Literature and culture of English as a global language. Requirements: four courses in Anglophone literature; one junior paper and the senior thesis on an Anglophone topic. Up to two cognate courses in another department (history, art and archaeology, etc.) on an Anglophone topic may be counted.

Arts and Media
Literature in relation to other arts, including architecture, visual art, film, photography, music (classical, popular, or other); and/or in relation to its circumstances of production and transmission, from manuscript to print to radio, television, and the Internet. Requirements: three courses in topics related to the arts and media, including up to two cognates from other departments; one junior paper and the senior thesis on a related topic.

Comparative Literatures
English in relation to the literature of another language. Requirements: at least three and no more than four 300-level courses in a single foreign language (with no other cognates permitted); one junior paper and the senior thesis on a comparative topic (including translation). With permission of the departmental representative, some foreign language classes may be used to satisfy the departmental distribution requirements.

Theory and Criticism
For students interested in thinking about the underlying principles by which we understand literature. Considers the history and theory of literary interpretation from Plato to the present, including such methods and movements as linguistics, structuralism, feminism, psychoanalysis, Marxism, cultural studies, gender and sexuality studies, race studies, postcolonial studies, and deconstruction. Requirements: three courses in literary or cultural theory and literary criticism, including either ENG 305 or ENG 306; one junior paper and the senior thesis on a topic in theory and criticism, or making imaginative use of critical methodologies.

Theater and Performance Studies
A home for the study of dramatic literature, performance culture, and/or performance studies. Includes traditional theater, live and recorded music, popular culture performances, avant-garde arts, stand-up comedy, street theater, contemporary dance, and slam poetry. Requirements: one introductory class in theater by the end of sophomore year; at least two and not more than three 300- or 400-level courses in theater, counted as departmental courses (no other cognates are allowed); departmental courses must also include one upper-level Shakespeare course, one course in drama and/or performance before 1700, and one course in drama and/or performance after 1700; one junior paper and the senior thesis on a related topic.

Creative Writing
Students elect the creative writing track provisionally; final admission depends on the permission of the Program in Creative Writing to write a creative thesis. The Department of English recommends that students take at least one 200-level creative writing course by the end of sophomore year. Requirements: a minimum of two and a maximum of three courses at the 300 level or above in creative writing counted as departmental courses (no other cognates are allowed); creative thesis. Students not approved to write a creative thesis revert to one of the other tracks. One 300-level creative writing class may be used as a cognate.

Individual Program of Study
By special arrangement with the departmental representative, students may design an interdisciplinary track in an area not covered by the above, counting two cognates taken in other departments toward their eight departmentals.

Cognates. Concentrators are ordinarily allowed one cognate course (a course in another department that is counted toward the requirements of the Department of English). Cognates should have a bearing on your studies in English (a history course in a period or place whose literature you have studied, a course in related literature of another language, etc.), and they must be approved by the departmental representative. (You can request approval by email.)

Independent Work

Concentrators write one junior paper, which is begun in conjunction with the fall junior seminar but completed in the spring semester of the junior year. The senior thesis is written with an adviser chosen in the spring of junior year.

The Junior Seminar. An introduction to the methods of research and the arts of criticism, taken in the fall of junior year. Concentrators choose one from a menu of five or six seminars when they sign into the department as sophomores. The courses are topical (ranging from Emily Dickinson to "Theater and Sacrifice"), but all of them involve intensive practice in the reading and writing of literary criticism. The fall junior paper is begun in conjunction with the seminar, with the seminar instructor continuing as adviser throughout the spring.

During the junior fall, students should plan a program of departmental courses for the next two years.The planned course work for the junior spring and senior year should be discussed with the junior seminar leader, who signs the TiberHub (link is external) sheet and acts as the junior adviser during the fall term.

The Senior Theses. For English concentrators, senior theses are 60-75 pages in length, on a topic chosen in collaboration with the thesis adviser and approved by the committee of departmental studies. One chapter or 20 pages of the thesis is due in December.

SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL EXAMINATION

Comprehensive examinations are set at the end of the senior year, in two four-hour parts on successive days. The first day consists of 15 to 20 passages from the full range of genres, periods, and geographies taught in the department; students write about three. The second day poses questions on period, genre, and theory.

The Rule of 12 
A student in the A.B. program is limited to 12 one-term courses (plus independent work) in a given department, plus up to two departmental prerequisites taken during the freshman or sophomore year. Students who exceed the 31-course requirement for graduation may exceed the Rule of 12 by as many courses (e.g., if you take 32 courses total, you can exceed the rule of 12 by one course). For most English concentrators, this means only 12 courses primarily designated as English courses (ENG courses or cross-listed courses where ENG comes first--e.g., ENG 327/GSS 332). Departmental cognates do not count against the Rule of 12.

Honors in English at graduation are computed according to the following percentages:

  • Departmentals (excluding the Junior Seminar) 50%
  • Thesis 25%
  • Junior Independent Work: 10% junior paper; 5% Junior Seminar
  • Comprehensives 10 percent

Further Information, consult the departmental representative and the department's website.

Study Abroad

The department encourages students to consider studying abroad for a semester or a year. We especially invite students to consider the junior fall term at University College London. There students attend a special Junior Seminar with a visiting Princeton professor and receive direct supervision for the fall junior paper while also attending courses taught through the University of London.

Courses taken abroad may, with approval, receive both departmental and distribution credit (in general, the department can accept two or three courses for each semester abroad). Students considering study abroad should consult the departmental representative at an early stage.

Certificate Programs
The department encourages concentrators to pursue certificates from other programs in conjunction with their studies in English. The creative writing and theater and performance studies tracks are specifically designed to accommodate students seeking the relevant certificates, and most students who specialize in comparative literatures get a certificate in their second language. Concentrators who specialize in American literature, culture, and language will find the program fits well with certificates in American studies or African American studies, but students in almost any track will find that their work in English can be profitably combined with such certificates as gender and sexuality studies, Judaic studies, Latin American studies, medieval studies, visual arts, environmental studies, or other programs.

 

Courses

ENG 132 Imagining America Not offered this year LA An introduction to the cross-cultural study of American literatures, with special attention to the multiple points of connection, conflict, dialogue, and exchange that characterize American writings. Texts may be drawn from a broad range of periods, regions, and cultures. One lecture, two classes. Staff
ENG 200 Introduction to English Literature: 14th to 18th Century Spring LA An introduction to English literary history. Centered on four great writers--Chaucer, Spenser, Milton, and Pope. Two lectures, one 50-minute preceptorial. R. Leo III
ENG 205 Reading Literature: Poetry Not offered this year LA An introduction to the art of poetry in English from Shakespeare to Mother Goose, from free verse to sestinas, from the beginnings to the 21st century. Discussions will range from the minutiae of how poetry works--rhythm, syntax, trope, image, lineation, sound--to the role of its unique kinds of thinking and feeling in our world. One three-hour seminar. S. Stewart
ENG 206 Reading Literature: Fiction Fall LA This course is designed to provoke and cultivate an interest both in close reading of particular texts and in the huge range of different forms of fiction. The goal is to enrich our understanding of the real world by knowing more about how the imagination works. Works studied will run from The Odyssey to contemporary English and American fiction. Two lectures, one 50-minute preceptorial. S. Chihaya
ENG 207 Reading Literature: Drama Fall LA This course is designed to teach students how to read plays as literature written for performance. Key assumptions are that every act of reading is an act of interpretation, that a good reader of dramatic literature engages in an activity nearly identical to that of a good director or actor or designer, and that a reader might learn from theater practitioners how to make critical choices based on close reading. Students will get on their feet to explore exactly how a play is what it is. Two lectures, one 50-minute preceptorial. M. Cadden
ENG 208 Reading Literature: The Essay Not offered this year LA This course introduces students to the range of the essay form as it has developed from the early modern period to our own. The class will be organized, for the most part, chronologically, beginning with the likes of Bacon and Hobbes, and ending with some contemporary examples of and reflections on the form. It will consider how writers as various as Sidney, Hume, Johnson, Emerson, Woolf, C.L.R. James, and Stephen Jay Gould have defined and revised The Essay. Two lectures, one 50-minute preceptorial. J. Nunokawa
ENG 230 Public Speaking Fall LA Emphasis upon the preparation and delivery of expository and persuasive speeches before audiences composed of the speaker's fellow students. Consultations with the instructor, readings in textbooks, and written analyses of speeches supplement frequent practice in speaking. One 90-minute lecture, two classes. T. Wolff
ENG 231 Topics in African American Studies (See AAS 230)
ENG 240 Origins and Nature of English Vocabulary (See CLA 208)
ENG 285 Topics in German Culture and Society (See GER 307)
ENG 300 Junior Seminar in Critical Writing Fall Students learn to write clear and persuasive criticism in a workshop setting while becoming familiar with a variety of critical practices and research methods. The course culminates in the writing of a junior paper. Each section will pursue its own topic; students are assigned according to choices made during sophomore sign-ins. Required of all English majors. One three-hour seminar. Staff
ENG 302 Comparative History of Literary Theory (See COM 303)
ENG 303 The Gothic Tradition (See COM 372)
ENG 305 Contemporary Literary Theory Not offered this year LA Fundamental questions about the nature, function, and value of literary theory. A small number of strategically selected theoretical topics, including exemplary literary works as reference points for discussion. Two 90-minutes seminars. A. Cole
ENG 306 History of Criticism Not offered this year LA A study of particular developments in criticism and theory, from Aristotle to Nietzsche. The course will also consider the relation of contemporary criticism to movements and issues such as deconstruction, feminism, psychoanalysis, and cultural materialism. Two 90-minute seminars. A. Cole
ENG 310 The Old English Period (also
MED 310
) Fall LA
An intensive introduction to the English language spoken and written in the British Isles approximately 500 to 1100 C.E., leading to a critical survey of the literature. Attention is paid both to linguistic questions and to the cultural context of such poems as Beowulf and the Dream of the Rood. Two 90-minute seminars. S. Anderson
ENG 311 The Medieval Period (also
MED 309
) Spring LA
A study of the Middle English texts that span the period from the Norman Conquest to the Tudor Renaissance, with attention paid to Middle English as a language. Readings will be chosen from verse romance, drama, political and religious writings, romance and/or lyric. Two lectures, one preceptorial. D. Smith
ENG 312 Chaucer (also
MED 312
) Fall LA
A study of Chaucer's art with reference to the intellectual, social, and literary conventions of the Middle Ages. The course introduces the student by this means to the characteristically medieval aspects of Chaucer's poetry. Two 90-minute seminars. A. Cole
ENG 314 Criticism Workshop (See THR 326)
ENG 317 The Modern European Novel (See COM 306)
ENG 320 Shakespeare I Fall LA A study of Shakespeare's plays, covering the first half of his career. Emphasis will be on each play as a work of art and on Shakespeare's development as a poet and dramatist. Two lectures, one preceptorial. L. Barkan
ENG 321 Shakespeare II Spring LA A study of Shakespeare's plays, covering the second half of his career. Emphasis will be on each play as a work of art and on Shakespeare's development as a poet and dramatist. Two lectures, one preceptorial. L. Barkan
ENG 322 Spenser Not offered this year LA A study of the development of the epic romance from Vergil to Spenser through a reading of the Aeneid and the three great Renaissance epic romances: Ariosto's Orlando Furioso, Tasso's Gerusalemme Liberata, and Spenser's The Faerie Queene. Two lectures, one preceptorial. J. Dolven
ENG 323 The 16th Century Not offered this year LA The study of 16th-century literature, both prose and poetry, in order to define the achievement of the English Renaissance. Literary accomplishments will be placed in the more general context of Elizabethan culture and Renaissance intellectual history. Readings in Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney, Shakespeare, Marlowe, Spenser, Donne. Two 90-minute seminars. J. Dolven
ENG 325 Milton Spring LA A study of Milton's poetry and prose, with particular attention to Milton's poetic style and development and his indebtedness to various classical traditions. Emphasis will also be given to Milton as thinker and to the place he holds in 17th-century thought. Two lectures, one preceptorial. N. Smith
ENG 326 The 17th Century Not offered this year LA A study of the interaction of literature, culture, and politics during the 17th century. The course will focus on the nature of political work done by literary texts, the representation of changing gender relations, and the evolution of literary forms. Authors include Jonson, Herbert, Donne, Marvell, Hobbes, Milton, Dryden, and the Cavalier Poets. Two 90-minute seminars. N. Smith
ENG 327 The English Drama to 1700 (also
GSS 410
) Not offered this year LA
A study of English drama from its medieval origins to Restoration comedy, with special attention to the astonishingly vital commercial theater of the Renaissance. The course will consider the aesthetic and cultural power of dramatic texts and the theater's characteristic production of social anxiety. Two 90-minute seminars. M. Cadden
ENG 328 Topics in the Renaissance Not offered this year LA An intensive study of various aspects of Renaissance literature. Topics may include sex and gender in the Renaissance, Shakespearean comedies, Elizabethan and Jacobean drama, Renaissance lyric poetry. Two 90-minute seminars. B. Cormack
ENG 329 Topics in the Renaissance Not offered this year LA An intensive study of various aspects of Renaissance literature. Topics may include sex and gender in the Renaissance, Shakespearean comedies, Elizabethan and Jacobean drama, Renaissance lyric poetry. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff
ENG 330 English Literature of the 18th Century Not offered this year LA A study of major figures from the Augustan Age through the Age of Johnson: Swift, Pope, Fielding, Boswell, Johnson, Sterne, and Blake. Selections include a wide range of literary types from Gulliver's Travels and Joseph Andrews to Boswell's London Journal and Blake's Marriage of Heaven and Hell. Two lectures, one preceptorial. C. Johnson
ENG 331 English Fiction before 1800 Not offered this year LA Primarily a course in novels of the 18th century, though early narratives may also be read. Among writers read will be Defoe, Smollett, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, the Gothic novelists, and Jane Austen. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff
ENG 335 American Literature before 1825 Not offered this year LA An examination of the literature of early America within the context of the intellectual, social, and literary traditions. The course will survey writers from Anne Bradstreet and Edward Taylor to Irving and Cooper, with emphasis on the influence of Puritanism and the Enlightenment. Two lectures, one preceptorial. S. Rivett
ENG 336 Special Topics in Performance Practice (See THR 330)
ENG 338 Topics in 18th-Century Literature Not offered this year LA This course will at different times deal with particular currents of literature and thought in the 18th century, or with individual authors. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff
ENG 339 Topics in 18th-Century Literature Not offered this year LA This course will at different times deal with particular currents of literature and thought in the 18th century, or with individual authors. Two lectures, one preceptorial. C. Johnson
ENG 340 Romanticism and the Age of Revolution Not offered this year LA A study of the Romantic movement in an age of revolutions: its literary culture, its variety of genres, its cultural milieu, and the interactions of its writers. Major figures to be studied include Wollstonecraft, Blake, Wordsworth, and Coleridge. Two 90-minute seminars. S. Wolfson
ENG 341 The Later Romantics Spring LA A study of the young writers who defined English literary culture, especially the Romantic movement, in Regency and late Georgian England. Course material will include poetry, prose, and fiction, with emphasis on close reading as well as cultural contexts. Among the major figures to be studied are the Shelleys, Byron, and Keats. Two 90-minute seminars. S. Wolfson
ENG 342 Experimental Fiction (See COM 325)
ENG 344 Topics in Romanticism Not offered this year LA An intensive study of particular aspects of British Romanticism, which may include individual authors, genres, experiments, and legacies. Two 90-minute seminars. E. Schor
ENG 345 19th-Century Fiction Fall LA Novels of the Romantic and Victorian periods, beginning with Jane Austen, including the Brontës and the major Victorians, and ending with Hardy. Two lectures, one preceptorial. J. Nunokawa
ENG 346 19th-Century Poetry Not offered this year LA This survey of 19th-century British poetry will explore the ways in which Victorian poetry and poetic form influenced and were influenced by national movements: education, empire, voting reform, gender relations, and the rise of technology. It will consider how the afterlife of 19th-century poetry haunts our interpretation of early 20th-century poetry, and re-historicize Victorian poetics amid the vibrant and complicated tapestry of the 19th century. Students will read poems by Tennyson, D.G. Rossetti, Christina Rossetti, Barrett Browning, Browning, Swinburne, Hardy, Clough, Bridges, and Hopkins. Two 90-minute seminars. M. Martin
ENG 347 Victorian Literature and Society Not offered this year LA An examination of the responses of Victorian novelists, poets, social critics, and graphic artists to poverty, industrialization, the "woman question," prostitution, slum life, and other social and political issues of the day. Special emphasis on the development of a language and imagery of social criticism. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff
ENG 348 Late Victorian Literature: Decadence and Rebellion Not offered this year LA This course studies the literature of the last decades of the Victorian era, often referred to as the fin de siècle (or end of the century). It will focus on literary, cultural, and social developments in the final years of the nineteenth century and first years of the twentieth, among them aestheticism, decadence, literary naturalism, imperialism, socialism, the arts and crafts movement, and the "new woman." Authors to be considered include Wilde, Conrad, Pater, Schreiner, Shaw, Hopkins, Hardy, Bridges, Kipling, Morris, Gissing, and Stevenson. Two ninety-minute lectures, one-hour preceptorial. D. Nord
ENG 350 Literature of the American Renaissance, 1820-1860 Not offered this year LA A study of the major forms and traditions of American literature during the earlier 19th century, with main emphasis on such writers as Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau, Dickinson, and Whitman. The artistic achievement of these writers will be studied in relation to developing literary conventions and cultural patterns in pre-Civil War America. Two 90-minute seminars. J. Kotin
ENG 351 American Literature: 1865-1930 Spring LA A study of the development of American literature within the context of the shifting social, intellectual, and literary conventions of the period. Emphasis will be on the artistic achievement of writers such as James, Howells, Twain, Dreiser, Crane, Adams, Wharton, Cather, Fitzgerald, and Faulkner. Two lectures, one preceptorial. A. Bendixen
ENG 352 African American Literature: Origins to 1910 (See AAS 353)
ENG 354 An Introduction to Latino Literature and Culture (also
AMS 454
/
LAO 354
) Not offered this year LA
This introduction to Latino literature will situate the long history of Latino writing in a network of linguistic and literary influences across race, geographics, and histories. We will read texts like Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burtón's The Squatter and the Don, Gloria Anzaldúa's Borderlands, and Junot Diaz's The Brief and Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. M. Huerta
ENG 356 Topics in American Literature (also
JDS 377
/
AMS 359
) Not offered this year LA
An investigation of issues outside the scope of traditional surveys of American literature. Topics may include: definitions of "America," literature of the South, contemporary poetry, New Historicism, America on film, the Harlem Renaissance, the Vietnam War, the sentimental novel, colonial encounters, literature of the Americas, fictions of empire, Jewish American writers. Two lectures, one preceptorial. E. Schor
ENG 357 Topics in American Literature Not offered this year LA An investigation of issues outside the scope of traditional surveys of American literature. Topics may include: definitions of "America," literature of the South, contemporary poetry, New Historicism, America on film, the Harlem Renaissance, the Vietnam War, the sentimental novel, colonial encounters, literature of the Americas, fictions of empire. Two lectures, one preceptorial. L. Mitchell
ENG 360 Modern Fiction Spring LA The Modern movement in English fiction, from Conrad and Joyce to the present. Two lectures, one preceptorial. M. DiBattista
ENG 362 Modern Poetry Not offered this year LA British poetry from the end of the 19th century to the middle of the 20th--from the height of empire to its dissolution. Special attention to the ways in which poets respond to crises historical and personal. Poets considered include Hardy, Yeats, Eliot, Auden, Stevie Smith, and Dylan Thomas, among others. One three-hour seminar. J. Kotin
ENG 364 Modern Drama I (also
COM 321
/
THR 364
) Not offered this year LA
A study of major plays by Ibsen, Strindberg, Jarry, Chekhov, Pirandello, Brecht, and Beckett. Emphasis will be given to the theatrical revolutions they initiated and to the influence they continue to exert on contemporary drama and theater. Two 90-minute seminars. R. Sandberg
ENG 366 African American Literature: Harlem Renaissance to Present (See AAS 359)
ENG 367 American Women Writers Not offered this year LA Nineteenth- and 20th-century literature by American women, with particular emphasis on their historical, cultural, and critical contexts. This course will survey the diversity of writings by American women in relation to questions of canon formation, immigration, race and ethnicity, genre, aesthetics, modernism, and postmodernism. Two lectures, one preceptorial. D. Fuss
ENG 368 American Literature: 1930-Present Fall LA A study of modern American writings, from Faulkner to Diaz, that emphasize the interplay between formal experimentation and thematic diversity. Two lectures, one preceptorial. L. Mitchell
ENG 370 Contemporary Fiction Not offered this year LA An exploration of the connections and disconnects of our ever-smaller world, viewed through English-language novels and films of the last 25 years. At stake: translatability of language and ideas, processes of immigration, dynamics of economic development, history and memory, heroism and maturity, and notions of the future itself, in societies of rapid change. Throughout, the intersections between state policy and individual lives will be considered, such that while the course is premised on grand geopolitical questions, attention will focus on localized examples: specific texts, close reading. Two lectures, one preceptorial. S. Chihaya
ENG 371 Contemporary Poetry Not offered this year LA With an emphasis on British, Australian, and American poetry from 1945 to the present, this course covers a range of work. It considers such groups as the Beats, the Confessionals, the Surrealists, and the New York School, but attention will mostly be devoted to major works by MacDiarmid, Bishop, Lowell, Auden, Berryman, Brooks, Jarrell, Thomas, Larkin, Levertov, Ammons, Creeley, Duncan, Ginsberg, O'Hara, Ashbery, Merwin, Tomlinson, Walcott, Hill, Plath, Murray, Trantner, Kinsella, and others. Classwork will be supplemented by attending readings on and off campus. Two lectures, one preceptorial. S. Stewart
ENG 372 Contemporary Drama (also
THR 372
) Not offered this year LA
An examination of some of the best literature written for the stage since the Second World War. Two lectures, one preceptorial. T. Wolff
ENG 373 Acting, Being, Doing, and Making: Introduction to Performance Studies (See THR 300)
ENG 385 Children's Literature Not offered this year LA A close examination of fairy tales and fantasies written for children but also addressed to adults. Questions to be considered will be literary, cultural, and psychological: the role of fantasy in an age of repression, didacticism versus amorality, male versus female writers, and the conventions of the Victorian fairy tale. Two lectures, one preceptorial. W. Gleason
ENG 386 Literature and Environment (also
ENV 386
) Not offered this year LA
Examines how literature defines concepts of "nature'' or "environment'' from agrarian to postindustrial times. The course will consider rural-urban interaction; forms of pastoral and anti-pastoral; representations of plant or animal life; images of place and region; influence of geography, ecology, and evolutionary biology on modern literary expression. Two 90-minute seminars. R. Nixon
ENG 388 The Female Literary Tradition (also
GSS 399
) Spring LA
The development of women's writing from the 18th century to the present with readings in poetry, fiction, and drama. Emphasis on relationships between gender and genre, and on historical, cultural, and theoretical issues raised by a female literary tradition. Two 90-minute seminars. D. Nord, M. DiBattista
ENG 389 Women Writers of the African Diaspora (also
AAS 389
/
GSS 389
) Not offered this year LA
A reading of fiction by African, Caribbean, and African American women writers. Diverse strategies for addressing issues of race, gender, and culture in local, global, personal, and political terms are considered. Two lectures, one preceptorial. D. Brooks
ENG 390 The Bible as Literature (also
COM 207
/
HUM 207
) Fall LA
The Bible will be read closely in its own right and as an enduring resource for literature and commentary. The course will cover its forms and genres, including historical narrative, uncanny tales, prophecy, lyric, lament, commandment, sacred biography, and apocalypse; its pageant of weird and extraordinary characters; and its brooding intertextuality. Students will become familiar with a wide variety of biblical interpretations, from the Rabbis to Augustine, Kafka and Kierkegaard. Cinematic commentary will be included--Bible films, from the campy to the sublime. One 90-minute lecture, one 90-minute preceptorial. D. Smith
ENG 392 Topics in African American Literature (See AAS 392)
ENG 393 African American Autobiography (See AAS 325)
ENG 397 New Diasporas (also
AAS 397
/
COM 339
) Spring LA
This course will explore the works of contemporary authors of the African and Caribbean diaspora in Europe and North America in relation to the changing historical and cultural context of migration and globalization. The course will consider how these writers have represented the process of relocation, acculturation, and the transnational moment. What is the role of the imagination in the rethinking of identities lived across boundaries? Why and how do these authors use the term diaspora to describe their experiences? How do the works of a new generation of writers from Africa and the Caribbean transform theories of globalization? S. Gikandi
ENG 401 Forms of Literature (also
AMS 396
) Fall LA
Each term course will be offered in special topics of English and American literature. One three-hour seminar. L. Mitchell
ENG 402 Forms of Literature Fall LA Each term course will be offered in special topics of English and American literature. One three-hour seminar. S. Stewart
ENG 403 Forms of Literature Fall EM Each term course will be offered in special topics of English and American literature. One three-hour seminar. M. Martin
ENG 404 Forms of Literature Not offered this year LA Each term course will be offered in special topics of English and American literature. One three-hour seminar. Staff
ENG 405 Topics in Poetry Not offered this year LA A focused view of a problem or issue in poetry, changing from year to year. Recent topics have emphasized problems of poetic language, metrics, poetry and social life, poetic influence and canonization, and the relations between poetry and other art forms. Two lectures, one preceptorial. J. Kotin
ENG 409 Topics in Drama (also
THR 443
) Not offered this year LA
A detailed discussion of different bodies of theatrical literature, with emphasis and choice of materials varying from year to year. The focus will be on a group of related plays falling within a specific historical period, the developing work of one playwright, or the relationships among thematics, characterization, and structure. Two lectures, one preceptorial. M. Cadden
ENG 411 Major Author(s) Spring LA A close study of the works of one or two authors. May include Austen, Dickinson, Wordsworth, George Eliot, Dickens, Melville, Faulkner, James, Stevens, or Woolf, among others. Two 90-minute seminars. E. Cadava
ENG 412 Major Author(s) Not offered this year LA A close study of the works of one or two authors. May include Austen, Dickinson, Wordsworth, George Eliot, Dickens, Melville, Faulkner, James, Stevens, or Woolf, among others. One three-hour seminar. D. Nord
ENG 413 Major Author(s) Not offered this year LA A close study of the works of one or two authors. May include Austen, Dickinson, Wordsworth, George Eliot, Dickens, Melville, Faulkner, James, Stevens, or Woolf, among others. One three-hour seminar. S. Stewart
ENG 414 Major Author(s) Not offered this year LA A close study of the works of one or two authors. May include Austen, Dickinson, Wordsworth, George Eliot, Dickens, Melville, Faulkner, James, Stevens, or Woolf, among others. One three-hour seminar. Staff
ENG 415 Topics in Literature and Ethics Spring EM Courses offered under this rubric will investigate ethical questions in literature. Topics will range from a critical study of the textual forms these questions take to a historical study of an issue traditionally debated by both literature and ethics (responsibility, rhetoric, justice, violence, oppression). Two lectures, one preceptorial. A. Womack
ENG 416 Topics in Literature and Ethics (also
AMS 416
) Spring EM
Courses offered under this rubric will investigate ethical questions in literature. Topics will range from a critical study of the textual forms these questions take to a historical study of an issue traditionally debated by both literature and ethics (responsibility, rhetoric, justice, violence, oppression). Two lectures, one preceptorial. S. Gikandi
ENG 417 Topics in Postcolonial Literature (also
COM 423
/
AFS 416
) Not offered this year LA
Approaches to the connections between literature and nationality, focusing either on literatures outside the Anglo-American experience or on the theoretical issues involved in articulating nationality through literature. Two 90-minute seminars. Z. Chaudhary
ENG 418 Topics in Postcolonial Literature Not offered this year LA Approaches to the connections between literature and nationality, focusing either on literatures outside the Anglo-American experience or on the theoretical issues involved in articulating nationality through literature. Two lectures, one preceptorial. D. Smith
ENG 419 Seminar. Types of Ideology and Literary Form (See COM 401)
ENG 420 The Lyric (See COM 309)
ENG 442 God, Satan, Goddesses, and Monsters: How Their Stories Play in Art, Culture, and Politics (See REL 350)