Department of French and Italian

  • Chair

    Thomas A. Trezise

  • Associate Chair

    Pietro Frassica

  • Departmental Representative

    Efthymia Rentzou

  • Director of Graduate Studies

    Göran M. Blix

  • Professor

    David M. Bellos, also Comparative Literature

    Pietro Frassica

    Gaetana Marrone-Puglia

    F. Nick Nesbitt

    Thomas A. Trezise

  • Associate Professor

    André Benhaïm

    Göran M. Blix

    Simone Marchesi

    Efthymia Rentzou

    Volker Schröder

    Christy Nicole Wampole

  • Assistant Professor

    Flora Champy

    Katie Chenoweth

  • Senior Lecturer

    Anna Cellinese

    Florent Masse

    Christine M. Sagnier

  • Lecturer

    Daniele De Feo

    Elisa Dossena

    Johnny A. Laforet

    Murielle M. Perrier

    Raphael Piguet

    Fanny Raineau

    Sara Teardo

    Carole M. Trévise

  • Visiting Lecturer

    Giovanni Riotta

  • Associated Faculty

    April Alliston, Comparative Literature

    Bridget Alsdorf, Art and Archeology

    David A. Bell, History

    M. Christine Boyer, Architecture

    Jeff Dolven, English

    Anthony T. Grafton, History

    Wendy Heller, Music

    Daniel Heller-Roazen, Comparative Literature

    Michael W. Jennings, German

    Jhumpa Lahiri, Lewis Center for the Arts and Creative Writing

    Pedro Meira Monteiro, Spanish and Portuguese

    Philip G. Nord, History

    Eileen A. Reeves, Comparative Literature

    Teresa Shawcross, History and Hellenic Studies

    Ezra N. Suleiman, Politics

The Department of French and Italian offers a liberal arts major designed to give students a thorough grounding in the language, literature, and culture of one or more of the subjects it teaches, seen as independent disciplines or in combination with other languages and cognate subjects. Its courses provide practical instruction in the French and Italian languages; the literatures and cultures of France and Italy in all periods, from medieval to contemporary; and literature in French written in other parts of Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas.

Students are encouraged to complement their courses in French and/or Italian with related and varied courses in other literatures, art history, history, political science, sociology, comparative literature, or other humanities subjects.

In addition to serving as the focus for an education in liberal arts, the French and Italian concentrations can be the basis for graduate or professional study. In mostly small classes and seminars, allowing extensive student/teacher interaction, students also become equipped to take up careers in such areas as journalism, business, law, government service, and international affairs. For non-majors, the department offers a rich set of language courses, from introductory to very advanced. It also offers a popular certificate program, allowing the study of French and Italian to be combined with concentration in history, architecture, English, politics, or any other subject available at Princeton.

Information and Departmental Plan of Study

The French Language Program. An Advanced Placement score of 5 or an SAT Subject Test score of at least 760 is required to satisfy the A.B. foreign language requirement at entrance, or for admission to a 200-level course.

Students who wish to continue a language begun in secondary school must have their proficiency measured either by a College Board score or by a placement test administered prior to course registration. Placement will depend on previous training and proficiency.

The normal program for beginners seeking a basic mastery of French is the sequence 101, 102, 107, which satisfies the University's language requirement. Normally students electing a beginner's course in any language will receive credit only if two terms are completed.

Students showing particular gifts in 101 may be admitted to the accelerated, double-credit spring course, 102-7, which also satisfies the University's language requirement.

Students with advanced placement in French will be placed in either 103 or 105 and will proceed to either 107 or 108 to satisfy the University language requirement. They also may be placed directly into 108. Students who have successfully completed 107 cannot take 108.

Course credit in 107 or 108 is also available through approved summer courses abroad (see Study and Work Abroad below). Funding may be available for selected and committed students. Students must pass a placement test upon their return to satisfy the language requirement.

The Italian Language Program. An Advanced Placement score of 5 or an SAT Subject Test score of at least 760 is required to satisfy the A.B. foreign language requirement at entrance, or for admission to a 200-level course.

Students who wish to continue a language begun in secondary school must have their proficiency measured either by a College Board score or by a placement test administered prior to course registration. Placement will depend on previous training and proficiency.

The normal program for beginners seeking a basic mastery of Italian is the sequence 101, 102, 107, which satisfies the University's language requirement. Normally students electing a beginner's course in any language will receive credit only if two terms are completed.

Students showing particular gifts in 101 may be admitted to the accelerated, double-credit spring course, 102-7, which also satisfies the University's language requirement.

Students with advanced placement in Italian will be placed in 107 to fulfill the University language requirement.

Course credit in 107 is also available through approved summer courses abroad (see Study and Work Abroad below). Funding may be available for selected and committed students. Students must pass a placement test upon their return to satisfy the language requirement.

All questions concerning placement and summer study are handled by the Director of the relevant language program.

Advanced Placement

For information about advanced placement, see the French and Italian language programs described above.

Prerequisites

The normal requirement for admission to the department is successful completion of at least one, preferably two, 200-level courses, including one of the following: FRE 211, 215, 221, 222, 224, or 225; ITA 208, 209, or 220. Students who have not satisfied this prerequisite by the end of sophomore year should consult with the departmental representative. Concentrators who plan to participate in one of the certificate programs, such as African studies, African American studies, European cultural studies, Latin American studies, or the study of gender and sexuality, must also satisfy the prerequisites of that program.

Early Concentration

Qualified students are encouraged to begin departmental concentration in the sophomore year. This has the advantage of a longer period for independent work and preparation of the senior thesis; it also makes a semester or junior year abroad more feasible.

Program of Study

All students are expected to include one advanced language course (FRE 207, 307, 407; ITA 207, 307) in their subject(s) of concentration. Any two of the following courses can count as one course credit for departmental requirement: FRE 211, 215, 221, 222, 224, 225; ITA 208, 209, 220, 225.

Courses taught in the department place varying emphases on language, literary history and interpretation, aesthetics and literary theory, and cultural and intellectual history. Students are therefore able to pursue courses of study that are consistent with their own interests. To complement this individualized approach to students' plans of study, the department offers four distinct tracks within the concentration in French and/or Italian:

Track 1. Concentration in one language, literature, and culture
Students concentrate in French or Italian. Eight upper-division courses are counted toward concentration. At least five of these must be in the language and subject of concentration. Up to three of the eight may be cognate courses approved by the departmental representative and drawn from other sections of the department or from other humanities and social science subjects.

Track 2. Concentration in two languages, literatures, and cultures
Students intending to combine work in two languages, civilizations, and cultures normally take a minimum of eight upper-division courses: five in one of the languages (one of which may be a cognate), and three in the other relevant language. The first language of concentration must be either French or Italian.

Track 3. Concentration in literature and any other related field approved by the departmental representative
Students intending to combine work in French or Italian and another related field normally take a minimum of eight upper-division courses: five in the relevant language and literature (one of which may be a cognate), and three in the other field. For example, students specializing in French or Italian and History, Politics, or Art and Archaeology, might take appropriate courses in those departments, such as HIS 345, 350, 351, or 365; POL 371, 372, 381, or 391; or ART 319, 320, or 333.

Track 4. Concentration in Literature and the Creative Arts
This track is designed for students who would like to combine work in French or Italian and a creative art, such as theater, music, dance, painting, film, and creative writing. Upon approval by the departmental representative, the student normally would take a minimum of eight upper-division courses: five in the relevant language and literature and three in the field related to the art of interest. In some cases, an original work of creation (e.g. paintings, prose, or poetry), or of performance (e.g. theater, music, dance), may substitute for the senior thesis. In these cases, students will be required also to submit a substantial critical work of at least 6,000 but no more than 10,000 words (25-35 pages), in which they will position and discuss their creative work in relation to the historical and cultural context of the language in question.

Important Note: Any upper-level French or Italian course taught in English will require all written work to be completed in French or Italian in order to count toward the concentration.

Independent Work

Junior Papers. At the time of entering the department, and in all cases no later than spring of the sophomore year, students should discuss their likely area of interest with the departmental representative in order to make the attribution of junior advisers as appropriate as possible. The adviser will be assigned at the beginning of junior year. Students should get in touch with their Junior Adviser and plan regular meetings. In consultation with their adviser, students will also choose the language in which they will draft their paper. Responsibility for making and keeping these arrangements falls on the student.

The first junior paper, written in the fall semester, should be about 4,000 words. The second junior paper, written in the spring semester, should be between 5,000 and 8,000 words. Both junior papers may be written in English, in which case a three-page summary in the relevant language must be provided. If the paper is written in the relevant language, a three-page summary in English is required.

Students following tracks 2, 3 or 4 may write one junior paper in one of their two subjects of concentration, and one in the other.

In preparing their papers students should conform to the principles specified in the University's instructions for the writing of essays. Presentation should follow either the Modern Language Association Handbook or The Chicago Manual of Style, with consistency.

Senior Thesis. As the culmination of their independent work, senior students write a thesis on an approved topic. Late in their junior year, students will discuss possible areas of interest with the departmental representative. Topics chosen in the past have ranged across the field of French and Italian studies, from linguistic problems and literary techniques to close textual analysis to thematic and ideological study. Students primarily interested in culture and civilization have written on art, on political and economic issues, on education, and on a variety of social questions. For students following tracks 2, 3, and 4, joint supervision may be arranged. The senior thesis is a major commitment of a student's time and energy, and the most important yardstick for choosing a topic is willingness to spend many hours immersed in that particular set of texts or problems.

Concentrators in French and/or Italian who are also earning certificates should consult with their advisers about selecting a suitable thesis topic. The senior thesis may be written in English, in which case a three-page summary in the relevant language must be provided. If the thesis is written in the relevant language, a three-page summary in English is required.

Senior theses should not be more than 20,000 words, nor should they fall below 15,000 words.

Senior Departmental Examination

The examination, taken in May of the senior year, is designed to test aspects of the student's entire program of study in the department. A list of required and recommended readings is provided for each of the languages and literatures taught in the department, and guides students in preparing for the written examination. The format of the examination is as follows:

1. Written Component (three hours) in class, including: (a) A sight translation. This exercise will consist of the translation of a short prose text (500 words or less) from French or Italian into English. The resulting translation should reflect the linguistic command and stylistic sophistication expected from a reasonably proficient speaker of French or Italian. For concentrators following Track 2, and combining French and Italian, the original text will be given in the dominant language. (b) An essay written in the language of specialization. Students will choose one topic out of three culture/literature questions. Topics will be based on the reading lists and course offerings.

2. Oral Presentation (30 minutes). A brief (10-15 minutes) oral presentation, in the language of concentration (French or Italian), followed by a discussion. The content of the presentation will be determined and prepared by the student in concert with his/her adviser, and may reflect any aspect of the student's own general intellectual and academic experience in the department. It may therefore stem from the senior thesis, but also largely refer to the overall course of study achieved in the subject of concentration. The examining committee will be constituted by at least two permanent faculty of each section.

Note: In order to better prepare for the comprehensive examination, students are strongly encouraged to include either FRE 307 or ITA 307 in their departmental course work.

Study and Work Abroad

The department strongly encourages its concentrators and certificate students to spend as much time as they can in any country, including those in Africa, where the language(s) they study is (are) widely spoken. There are several ways of doing this within the four-year undergraduate degree: by study abroad for one or two semesters; by summer study abroad; or by obtaining summer work or an internship abroad.

Junior Semester/Junior Year Abroad. Students planning to spend a semester or their whole junior year abroad should seek advice from the departmental representative and from relevant faculty in choosing a suitable program of study. Further assistance is available from the Office of International Programs. Departmental and University approval is required.

Grades awarded by foreign institutions for courses that are recognized in lieu of Princeton courses are not included in the computation of departmental honors.

Students studying abroad for one or two semesters are not exempted from independent work requirements. The responsibility for consulting with advisers, as well as for meeting all normal deadlines, lies with the student. Students who complete a semester abroad may normally count two of the course units completed abroad as departmentals. Students must complete the program abroad to the standard required by the foreign institution.

Summer Language Study. The department has a special relationship with the Institut International de Langue IS Aix-en-Provence, which offers intensive four-week language courses in French at various levels, as well as with the Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa, where select students of Italian can take a four-week intensive course while living on the SNS campus. The department is able to provide financial support to a small number of students in these programs each year.

It also maintains ties with the Bryn Mawr College summer programs held in Avignon, in French language, literature, art, and civilization (including social, political, and economic institutions). See the departmental representative if you are interested in one of these programs.

Summer Work Abroad. Princeton-in-France is a long-established summer work program that selects students who qualify linguistically to take on the responsibilities of a paying summer job or internship in France. Travel grants and salary supplements are available to students who receive financial aid. Announcements will be made early in the fall concerning a November information meeting about the program. The application deadline is early December.

Information about other placements and internships abroad may also be obtained from the director of international internships in the Office of International Programs.

Certificate in Language and Culture

Admission. The program is open to undergraduates in all departments. Students should consult the departmental representative by the beginning of the junior year. Ordinarily, students concentrating in language and literature departments, including comparative literature, will be eligible for the certificate in language and culture provided that: (a) the linguistic base for the language and culture certificate is different from the linguistic base of the concentration; and (b) the work required for the language and culture certificate does not duplicate the requirements of the major. Students pursuing area studies certificates may earn the certificate in language and culture provided that: (a) the courses they elect to satisfy the requirements of the area studies program are different from those they elect to satisfy the requirements of the language and culture certificate program; and (b) they submit a piece of independent work in addition to the independent work that satisfies the requirements of the area studies program.

Application forms are available from the departmental office located in 303 East Pyne and on the FIT website. A separate application must be completed for each language in which a certificate will be pursued.

Plan of Study. The Certificate in Language and Culture is available in French and Italian and involves satisfactory completion of the following requirements:

1. Four departmental courses in the relevant language, linguistics, literature, or culture, excluding courses that do not have a language prerequisite. At least three of these courses must be at the 300 level (or higher). At the 200 level, the course must be higher than FRE 207 and ITA 207. Courses below these levels are not eligible. At the discretion of the departmental representative, a student may substitute one pre-approved course per semester abroad, or one pre-approved course taken in the summer. A 200-level course is a prerequisite for taking 300-level courses in French or Italian. Courses must be taken for a letter grade, no Pass/D/Fail or Audit.

Please note: Any upper-level French or Italian course taught in English will require all written work to be completed in French or Italian in order to count toward the concentration.

2. Independent Work. This requirement can be satisfied in one of several ways: (a) by a substantial paper on a topic agreed upon with the student's appointed adviser; (b) by a substantial paper growing out of one of the courses taken to fulfill the certificate requirement (this paper is in addition to the work required in the course; the subject and scope of this paper will be agreed upon with the student's appointed adviser); or (c) with the agreement of the student's home department, a student may submit a junior paper or a senior thesis that satisfies the requirements of both the home department and the Department of French and Italian. A junior paper or senior thesis of this sort must be based in substantial part on foreign language sources and display effective competence in utilizing the relevant language as an indispensable research tool.

Papers of types (a) and (b) are approximately 4,000 to 5,000 words in length. Students are urged to write them in the appropriate foreign language. Alternatively, they may submit the independent work in English together with a 700- to 1,000-word summary in the foreign language. Students submitting a junior paper or a senior thesis in lieu of independent work [in line with option (c) above] must also submit the summary in the foreign language.

Courses

FRE 101 Beginner's French I Fall This class develops the basic structures and vocabulary for understanding, speaking, writing, and reading in French. Classroom activities foster communication and cultural competence through comprehension and grammar exercises, skits, conversation and the use of a variety of audio-visual materials.No credit is given for FRE 101 unless it is followed by FRE 102. Prerequisites: Princeton French Language Placement test. Staff
FRE 102 Beginner's French II Spring The objective of this course is to enable students to achieve intermediate communication proficiency in French. All four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing will be actively practiced in realistic communicative situations, through a variety of activities designed to help students to strengthen newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures. Students will learn to talk about events and people, construct narratives in French and develop reading and writing skills that will be a foundation for literacy in the target language. There is wide use of authentic material from France and the Francophone world throughout the course. Staff
FRE 1027 Intensive Intermediate and Advanced French Spring FRE 1027 is an intensive double-credit course designed to help students develop an active command of the language. Focus will be on reading and listening comprehension, oral proficiency, grammatical accuracy, and the development of reading and writing skills. A solid grammatical basis and awareness of the idiomatic usage of the language will be emphasized. Students will be introduced to various Francophone cultures through readings, videos, and films. Prerequisite: FRE 101 and permission of instructor. Five 90-minute classes. Staff
FRE 103 Intensive Beginner's and Intermediate French Fall/Spring FRE 103 is an intensive beginning and intermediate language course designed for students who have already studied French for typically no more than two-to-three years. This course covers material presented in FRE 101 and FRE 102 in one semester and is designed to prepare students to take FRE 107 the following semester. Classroom activities include comprehension and grammar exercises, conversation, skits, and working with a variety of audio-visual materials. Prerequisites: Two years of high school French and appropriate score on the Princeton French Language Placement Test. Staff
FRE 105 Intermediate French Fall The main objective of this course is to develop your listening, speaking and writing skills, while allowing you to strengthen your knowledge of contemporary French society and culture. There is a thorough review of French grammar and a wide range of communicative activities chosen to improve proficiency and give practice of newly acquired linguistic material. The course aims at building your confidence in French, while giving you a foundation for the understanding and appreciation of French-speaking cultures and exposing you to their rich literary and artistic productions. A wide range of authentic material will be offered, including films. Staff
FRE 107 Intermediate/Advanced French Fall/Spring The objective of this course is to examine what it means to communicate in a foreign language while helping students strengthen their linguistic skills and gain transcultural and translingual competence. Students will reflect on differences in meaning through the study of diverse cultural modules, including stereotypes, slang, advertisements, Impressionist art, Occupied France, current events, and French and Francophone literary texts and films. FRE 107 is not open to first-year students in the fall semester. Prerequisites: FRE 102 or FRE 103. Staff
FRE 108 Advanced French Fall/Spring FRE 108 is an intermediate advanced course. It will take you on a journey through various periods of French history and culture and offer an opportunity to reflect on important questions at the center of contemporary debates. Examples include: the role of the State in the shaping of the nation, the organic revolution, the role of education in our society, etc. We have selected a wide variety of materials (films, videos, music, newspaper articles and literary texts) and carefully incorporated them into the curriculum so you will develop the ability to communicate and gain understanding of French and Francophone cultures and societies. Staff
FRE 207 Studies in French Language and Style Fall/Spring An interdisciplinary course proposing the study of language, culture, and French and Francophone literatures organized around the theme "Visions fantastiques". Includes the study of different genres and mediums on topics including fairy tales and folk tales, utopias and dystopias, science fiction, and folly, dreams and the surreal. The course offers a review and reinforcement of advanced grammatical structures and aims to improve written and oral expression through the study of texts. Prerequisites: FRE 107, FRE 108, or placement based on placement test. Staff
FRE 211 French Theater Workshop (also
THR 211
) Fall LA
L'Avant-Scène will offer students the opportunity to put their language skills in motion by discovering French theater in general and by acting in French, in particular. The course will introduce students to acting techniques while allowing them to discover the richness of the French dramatic canon. Particular emphasis will be placed on improving students' oral skills through pronunciation and diction exercises. At the end of the semester, the course will culminate in the performance of the students' work. Prerequisites: FRE 108 or equivalent. FRE 207 recommended as a co-requisite. F. Masse
FRE 215 France Today: Culture, Politics, and Society Fall SA This course is designed to develop students' linguistic skills and broaden their knowledge of contemporary French society. Discussions and essays will cover a wide range of topics drawn from economic, political, social and cultural aspects of France and the Francophone world. Current affairs will be discussed in class on a regular basis. The course will provide intensive language practice and students will improve their communication skills by completing a research project, to be presented orally and in writing, on a topic of their choice. Excellent preparation for Princeton-in-France internships or Sciences-Po semester. C. Sagnier
FRE 221 The Rise of France: French Literature, Culture, and Society from the Beginnings to 1789 Fall LA This course examines the evolution of French society and culture during the Ancien Régime (i.e. from the Middle Ages to the Revolution). Students will explore the main cultural and social ideas of the period by studying outstanding literary and artistic masterpieces. Topics include: courtly love, the discovery of the New World, political absolutism and Versailles court culture, the opposition to political and social authorities in the Enlightenment period. Prerequisites: FRE 107, FRE 108, or equivalent. Staff
FRE 222 The Making of Modern France: French Literature, Culture, and Society from 1789 to the Present Spring LA This course examines the major historical and cultural developments that have shaped France since the Revolution. By studying a series of classic texts, important films, paintings, and essays, we will undertake an interdisciplinary tour through two centuries of French cultural history, addressing issues such as nationhood, colonialism, democracy, and consumer society. The focus will be on the relations between artistic renovation, social change, and historical events. Prerequisites: FRE 107, FRE 108, or equivalent. FRE 207 recommended as a co-requisite. G. Blix
FRE 224 French Literature: Approaches to the Language of Literary Texts Fall/Spring LA This course is meant to introduce students to great works of French literature from a range of historical periods and to provide them with methods for literary interpretation through close reading of these texts. The syllabus is organized around common themes and generic categories. This course is invaluable preparation for more advanced and specialized 300-level courses. Classroom discussion emphasized, free exchange encouraged. Prerequisites: FRE 107 or FRE 108 or permission of instructor. Course conducted entirely in French. V. Schröder
FRE 307 Advanced French Language and Style Fall/Spring The objective of this course is to improve spoken and written French through attentive study of French grammatical and syntactic structures and rhetorical styles, with a variety of creative, analytical and practical writing exercises, and reading of literary and non-literary texts. Prerequisites: A 200-level French course or permission of instructor. Staff
FRE 313 Contemporary French Civilization LA The evolution of 20th-century French institutions and their relationship to intellectual and social movements since World War I. New directions taken by French thought will be stressed through the study of individuals, selected from representative fields, whose influence led to the restructuring of contemporary French civilization. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: a 200-level course in French or instructor's permission. Staff
FRE 317 Visions of Paris LA A study of Paris as urban space, object of representation, and part of French cultural identity. Topics include Paris in the Ancien Régime; Revolutionary and Napoleonic Paris; the transformation of Paris in the 19th century; Paris as a site of European art and literature; modern and multicultural Paris in the 1900s; and challenges in the new millennium. Prerequisite: a 200-level course in French or instructor's permission. One 90-minute lecture, one 90-minute preceptorial. A. Benhaïm
FRE 321 The Invention of Literature and Culture in France (also
GSS 330
) LA
The birth of literature in the Middle Ages in France is accompanied by remarkable inventiveness. From the glamour of troubadour love songs to the somber passion of heroic poetry, from the refinements of chivalric romance to the bawdy of (fabliaux), from intricate lyric forms to complex prose romances, medieval writers not only practiced but constantly re-created the emergent concept of "literature," elaborating, as they did so, such legendary tales as those of Roland, Tristan, Lancelot, and the grail. Prerequisite: a 200-level course in French or instructor's permission. One 90-minute lecture, one 90-minute preceptorial. Staff
FRE 327 Tales of Hospitality: France, North Africa, and the Mediterranean (also
COM 357
) Spring EM
An exploration of the concept of hospitality, individual and collective, in French, Mediterranean, and Maghrebi (i.e., North African: Arab, Berber, and Jewish) cultures. Draws on materials from literature and the arts, politics and law, philosophy and religion. Issues studied include immigration, citizenship, alienation, and, more generally, the meaning of welcoming a stranger. Prerequisite: a 200-level course in French or instructor's permission. One 90-minute lecture, one 90-minute preceptorial. A. Benhaïm
FRE 330 Landmarks of French Culture (also
AFS 330
) LA
An interdisciplinary study of places, periods, persons, or questions that helped define French cultural identity, from its origins to the present. Areas of study could include courtly love; gothic art; the Enyclopedia; the Belle Epoque; the Figure of the Intellectual from Zola to Simone de Beauvoir; the sociocultural revolution of May 1968; colonization, its discontents, and its aftermaths; France in the age of globalization; Franco-American relations; etc. Prerequisite: a 200-level course in French or instructor's permission. Two 90-minute classes. Staff
FRE 331 French Renaissance Literature and Culture LA Readings from the works of Rabelais, the Pléiade poets, Marguerite de Navarre, Montaigne, and d'Aubigné in the light of contemporary artistic, political, and cultural preoccupations. Themes will include the rhetoric of love, education, humanism, recurrent mythologies, and utopias. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: a 200-level course in French or instructor's permission. Staff
FRE 332 Topics in the French Middle Ages and Renaissance LA The continuities of French culture and its preeminence over much of Europe from its 11th-century beginnings through the 16th century. Emphasis on medieval and Renaissance literary works (in modernized versions) in their relationship to topics such as "love'' (fin'amor), saintliness, national identity, humanism, and so on. Prerequisite: a 200-level course in French or instructor's permission. One 90-minute lecture, one 90-minute preceptorial. Staff
FRE 341 The Classical Age Fall LA This course proposes a literary exploration of the French 17th century, a period that produced many "classics" of world literature, from the comedies of Molière and the fables of La Fontaine to the tales of Perrault. We will study these works both in their original historical context and through modern adaptations and interpretations, in order to assess the reasons for their survival and continued relevance. Some of the central themes are: love and marriage, passion and duty, self and society, truth and fiction, heroism and beastliness. Prerequisite: A 200-level French course or permission of instructor. V. Schröder
FRE 351 The Age of Enlightenment LA Examines the challenge to the political and cultural authority of the ancien régime from new ideas, values, and rhetorics. The emphasis may fall on the work of an individual writer or group of writers, a genre or subgenre (the epistolary novel, the popular scientific essay), or the role of literary institutions (journalism, salons, censorship). Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: a 200-level French course or instructor's permission. Staff
FRE 352 Topics in 17th- and 18th-Century French Literature Fall LA Topics will range from single authors and major texts (for example, the Encyclopedie) to literary genres and questions of culture (preciosite, comedy and/or tragedy, historiography, epistolary writing, etc.). Prerequisite: FRE 207 or equivalent. Course conducted in French. Two 90-minute classes. Staff
FRE 353 The Old Regime: Society and Culture in France, 1624-1789 LA The age of French political and cultural hegemony is characterized by the construction of the modern state, the imposition of strict social discipline, and the rationalization of large areas of human behavior. These processes will be studied in political and philosophical writings, plays, novels, poems, and memoirs. Prerequisite: a 200-level course in French or instructor's permission. Two 90-minute classes. Staff
FRE 357 Literature, Culture, and Politics (also
TRA 357
) LA
Literary texts represent and often question relations of power and cultural norms, but as a form of knowledge, literature is itself implicated in power relations. Topics range from the work of a writer or group of writers who composed both fiction and political theory or commentary to the function of censorship and of literary trials. Prerequisite: a 200-level course in French or instructor's permission. One 90-minute lecture, one 90-minute preceptorial. Staff
FRE 362 The 19th-Century French Novel Fall LA Close readings of landmark novels from nineteenth-century France by Balzac, Stendhal, Hugo, Flaubert, Zola, Huysmans, Gide, Verne, and Constant. What course did the modern novel chart between realism and naturalism, romantic disenchantment and fin-de-siècle decadence, engaged art and aesthetic detachment, national history and private life? How did the novel reflect, shape, and map this revolutionary period in French history? Topics to be highlighted: formal innovation, realism, social critique, theories of the novel, the reading public, and print culture. Prerequisite: a 200-level French course or instructor's permission. G. Blix
FRE 363 The 20th-Century French Novel LA A study of major themes, forms, and techniques in modern fiction. Close analysis of works by Proust, Gide, Céline, Sartre, Camus, Sarraute, Duras, Robbe-Grillet, and Condé. The nouveau roman and experiments in contemporary fiction will be examined as well as the cultural, moral, and political problems of our times. One 90-minute lecture, one 90-minute preceptorial. Prerequisite: a 200-level French course or instructor Staff
FRE 364 Modern French Poetry Not offered this year LA Postromantic poetry, including works by Baudelaire, the symbolists (Verlaine, Rimbaud, Mallarmé), such modernists as Valéry, Apollinaire, and the surrealists. Special emphasis is placed on close textual analysis, as well as on symbolist, surrealist, and contemporary poetics. Two 90-minute seminars. Prerequisite: a 200-level French course or instructor Staff
FRE 365 French Theater LA Plays by Molière, Corneille, Racine, Beaumarchais, Marivaux, Hugo, Feydeau, Jarry, Claudel, Giraudoux, Anouilh, Sartre, Genet, Ionesco, and Beckett, along with consideration of mise en scène, techniques of acting, theories of Artaud, and evolution of such traditions as théâtre de moeurs, boulevard comedy, and theater of the absurd. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: a 200-level French course or instructor's permission. Staff
FRE 366 French Fiction in Translation LA Innovations in the theory and practice of French narrative from the 1850s to the present, considered in cultural, historical, and intellectual context. Works by Flaubert, Proust, Gide, Céline, Camus, Sarraute, Yourcenar, and others will be read in English translation. Prerequisite: a 200-level literature course or instructor's permission. Two 90-minute classes. T. Trezise
FRE 367 Topics in 19th- and 20th-Century French Literature and Culture Spring LA Topics will range from the oeuvre and context of a single author (for example, Balzac, Baudelaire, or Beckett) to specific cultural and literary problems (modernism and the avant-garde, history as literature, women's writing). Prerequisite: a 200-level French course or instructor's permission. F. Nesbitt
FRE 371 World Literatures in French Spring LA A survey of the literature of decolonization in the Francophone world. The focus will be on the invention of a critical and militant literature in 1950's and 60's North and West Africa, the Caribbean, and Viet Nam. Texts will include poetry, essays, novels, and films. Prerequisite: 200-level French class or permission of instructor. F. Nesbitt
FRE 391 Topics in French Cinema (also
VIS 347
) LA
Major movements and directors in French and French-language cinema. Topics may include: early history of the cinematographe; the Golden Age of French film; Renoir, Bresson, Tati; the "New-Wave"; French women directors of the 1980s; adaptation of literary works. T. Trezise
FRE 401 Topics in French Literature and Culture LA Issues pertaining to French literature and/or culture that transcend chronological boundaries. The specific content of the course will change each time it is offered. Possible topics include: French Autobiographical Writings, The Idea of Nationhood in France, The French Intellectual, Satire and Humor in France. Prerequisite: a 200-level course in French or instructor's permission. One three-hour seminar. Staff
FRE 403 Topics in Francophone Literature, Culture, and History (also
AFS 403
/
LAS 412
) LA
This course will study a selection of the writings of Aimé Césaire, a towering figure of the 20th century in poetry, theatre, and postcolonial critique and politics. Césaire's poetry is arguably the most accomplished oeuvre of any anticolonial poet of the century, and a pinnacle of modernist French poetry tout court. Similarly, Césaire's theatrical works are outstanding moments in the creation of a theatre of decolonization, while his celebrated critical pieces, such as the "Discours sur le colonialisme", articulate the ethical and political grounds for the struggle to end colonialism. F. Nesbitt
FRE 407 Prose Translation (also
TRA 407
) LA
A practical investigation of the issues affecting translation between English and French. Weekly exercises will offer experience of literary, technical, journalistic and other registers of language. Discussion will focus on the linguistic, cultural and intellectual lessons of translation seen as a practical discipline in its own right. Prerequisite: FRE 307 or equivalent level of proficiency in French. D. Bellos
ITA 101 Beginner's Italian I Fall To develop the skills of speaking, understanding, reading and writing Italian. The main emphasis is on oral drill and conversation in the classroom. Aspects of Italian culture and civilization will be touched upon. No credit given for ITA 101 unless followed by ITA 102. Staff
ITA 102 Beginner's Italian II Spring Further study of Italian grammar and syntax with increased emphasis on vocabulary, reading, and practice in conversation. Skills in speaking and writing (as well as understanding) modern Italian will also be further developed. Some aspects of Italian culture and civilization will be touched upon. Prerequisite: ITA 101 or permission of instructor. Staff
ITA 1027 Intensive Intermediate and Advanced Italian Spring Italian 1027 is an intensive double-credit course designed to help students develop an active command of the language by improving upon the five skills of speaking, listening, reading, writing and cultural competency in the interpretative, interpersonal, and presentational modes. The course emphasizes communication and grammatical structures through use of various forms of texts (literary, artistic, musical, cinematographic, etc.) in order to refine students' literacy. Prerequisite: Successful performance in ITA 101 and permission of instructor. Five 90-minute classes. Staff
ITA 107 Advanced Italian Fall This course is designed to help the student who already has some background in Italian to develop greater facility in speaking and writing Italian on an advanced level. Principally oral approach. Classes are conducted entirely in Italian. Prerequisite: ITA 102 or instructor's permission. Five classes. Staff
ITA 207 Studies in Italian Language and Style Not offered this year Intensive practice in spoken and written Italian with emphasis on vocabulary acquisition and advanced syntactical structures. Close readings and translations of contemporary Italian prose. Discussions are based on newspaper and magazine articles, television, and films. Emphasis on an audio-video approach to Italian language and culture. Prerequisite: 107 or instructor's permission. Three classes. Staff
ITA 208 Introduction to Italy Today Spring This course is designed to familiarize the student with major features of contemporary Italy and its culture. Its purpose is to develop the student's ability to communicate effectively in present-day Italy. The course emphasizes Italian social, political, and economic institutions, doing so through the analysis of cultural and social differences between Italians and Americans in such everyday concerns as money, work and leisure. Prerequisite: ITA 107 or permission of instructor. P. Frassica
ITA 220 Italian Civilization Through the Centuries Fall LA This course is designed to give an overview of pivotal moments in Italian culture, such as the relationship between Church and Empire in the Middle Ages, Machiavelli's political theory during the Renaissance, and the rise and fall of Fascism in the 20th century. Through the examination of the most relevant intellectual, historic and artistic movements and their main geographical venues, students will be able to acquire a comprehensive understanding of the development of Italian history and civilization. Prerequisite: Italian 107 or instructor's permission. Staff
ITA 225 Music and Lyrics: Italy in the Eyes of its Pop Singers Spring LA Working at the crossroads of American influences and the tradition of political songs, Italian cantautori merge popular appeal and literary sophistication. For at least three generations, their songs have provided an engaged soundtrack to Italy's turbulent social, political and cultural transformations in the post-WWII years. As lyrics on the page, as music to be listened to, and as performances recorded in video, Italian canzoni d'autore are part of the Italian history and identity today. Prerequisite: ITA 107 or permission of instructor. This course is taught in Italian. S. Marchesi
ITA 302 Topics in Medieval Italian Literature and Culture Fall LA Topics will range from the work of a single author (such as Boccaccio) and certain major texts to specific cultural, literary, and poetic problems (such as the medieval comune). Major figures include Giacomo da Lentini, Guido Guinizelli, Guido Cavalcanti, Petrarch, and Boccaccio. Alternates with 306. Prerequisite: One 200-level ITA course or permission of instructor. S. Marchesi
ITA 303 Dante's "Inferno" (also
MED 303
) LA
Intensive study of the Inferno, with major attention paid to poetic elements such as structure, allegory, narrative technique, and relation to earlier literature, principally the Latin classics. Two 90-minute classes, one preceptorial. S. Marchesi
ITA 306 The Italian Renaissance: Literature and Society LA Readings from the works of Ariosto, Machiavelli, Guicciardini, Tasso, Della Casa, Michelangelo, and Bembo, interpreted in light of artistic and cultural preoccupations of the time. Topics include: Tasso and the Counter-Reformation sensibility, the Renaissance epic, history and the writing of history. One three-hour seminar. Alternates with 302. Prerequisite: a 200-level Italian course or instructor's permission. P. Frassica
ITA 307 Advanced Language and Style LA Intensive practice of written and spoken Italian through close analysis of grammatical and syntactic structures, literary translation, and the stylistic study of representative literary works from the Middle Ages to the present. Focus on rhetorical structures and on Italian linguistic change. Prerequisite: a 200-level course in Italian or instructor's permission. Two 90-minute classes. Staff
ITA 308 Topics in 20th-Century Italian Literature Fall LA Topics will range from the study of a single author (such as Pirandello, Montale, Pavese, D'Annunzio) to the investigation of specific literary and poetic problems. One three-hour seminar. Prerequisite: ITA 107, ITA 207I, ITA 208 or permission of instructor. P. Frassica
ITA 309 Topics in Contemporary Italian Civilization LA The evolution of Italian contemporary civilization through the study of historical, sociopolitical, and cultural topics. The approach will be interdisciplinary; each year a different topic will be selected and studied as portrayed in representative samples of slides, films, and pertinent reading material. One three-hour seminar. Prerequisite: a 200-level Italian course or instructor's permission. Offered in alternate years. P. Frassica
ITA 310 Topics in Modern Italian Cinema (also
VIS 443
) Spring LA
An introduction to Italian cinema from 1945 to the present. Through an interdisciplinary approach, the course will focus on sociopolitical and cultural issues as well as on basic concepts of film style and technique. Specific topics will change from year to year, and prerequisites will vary. One three-hour seminar, one film showing. G. Marrone-Puglia
ITA 311 Topics in 19th-Century Italian Literature (also
COM 379
) LA
Topics will range from the study of a single author (such as Leopardi, Manzoni, Verga) to the thematic, artistic, and cultural analysis of either a genre or a literary movement (such as Romanticism, Verismo). One three-hour seminar. Prerequisite: a 200-level Italian course or instructor's permission. G. Marrone-Puglia
ITA 312 Fascism in Italian Cinema (also
VIS 445
) Not offered this year HA
A study of fascist ideology through selected films from World War II to the present. Topics include: the concept of fascist normality; racial laws; the role of women; and the Resistance and the intellectual left. Films include: Bertolucci's The Conformist, Fellini's Amarcord, Rossellini's Open City, and Benigni's Life is Beautiful. The approach is interdisciplinary and combines the analysis of sociohistorical themes with a cinematic reading of the films. One lecture, one two-hour preceptorial, one film screening. G. Marrone-Puglia
ITA 313 Marxism in Italian Cinema (also
VIS 446
) Not offered this year LA
A study of the influence of Marxist ideology on major Italian directors from the Cold War to the present. Representative films include: Bertolucci's The Last Emperor, Visconti's The Leopard, Pasolini's Teorema, Wertmuller's Seven Beauties, Pontecorvo's The Battle of Algiers. The approach will be interdisciplinary and will combine the analysis of historical and political themes with a cinematic reading of the films. One lecture, one two-hour preceptorial, one film screening. G. Marrone-Puglia
ITA 401 Seminar in Italian Literature and Culture LA Investigation of a major theme or author, with special attention to formal structures and intellectual context. Topics may range from the medieval chivalric tradition in such Renaissance masterpieces as Ariosto's Orlando Furioso to a reading of the writings of Primo Levi as these examine the issue of the annihilation of the personality. Prerequisite: a 300-level course in Italian or instructor's permission. One three-hour seminar. Staff