Department of Music

Faculty

Chair

  • Wendy Heller

Director of Undergraduate Studies

  • Gavin Steingo

Director of Graduate Studies

  • Steven Mackey
  • Elizabeth H. Margulis

Professor

  • Donnacha M. Dennehy
  • Wendy Heller
  • Steven Mackey
  • Elizabeth H. Margulis
  • Simon A. Morrison
  • Daniel L. Trueman
  • Dmitri Tymoczko
  • Barbara A. White

Associate Professor

  • Juri Seo
  • Gavin Steingo
  • Rob C. Wegman

Assistant Professor

  • Jamie L. Reuland

Professor of the Practice

  • Gabriel Crouch
  • Michael J. Pratt

Senior Lecturer

  • Rudresh K. Mahanthappa
  • Jeffrey O. Snyder

Lecturer

  • Darcy James Argue
  • Brian E. Brown
  • Geoffrey L. Burleson
  • Ronald M. Cappon
  • Eric B. Cha-Beach
  • Susannah G. Chapman
  • Elaine Christy
  • Ted Chubb
  • Michael D. Cochrane
  • Sarah Cunningham
  • Kevin G. Deas
  • Vincent B. Ector
  • Martha Elliott
  • Rochelle K. Ellis
  • Alan Feinberg
  • John J. Ferrari
  • Benjamin L. Herrington
  • Jack D. Hill
  • Jacqueline Horner-Kwiatek
  • Margaret A. Kampmeier
  • Francine Kay
  • David S. Kellett
  • Christopher A. Komer
  • Brian Kuszyk
  • David Miller
  • Ruth A. Ochs
  • Laura Oltman
  • Alberto Parrini
  • Matthew Parrish
  • Sarah C. Pelletier
  • Joshua Quillen
  • Nate Radley
  • Barbara J. Rearick
  • Trineice Robinson-Martin
  • Angelica Sanchez
  • Adam Sliwinski
  • Jo-Ann Sternberg
  • Jennifer C. Tao
  • Olivier P. Tarpaga
  • Jessica L. Thompson
  • Jason Treuting
  • Robert J. Wagner
  • Nancy J. Wilson
  • Eric Wyrick

Visiting Associate Professor

  • Ralph M. Bowen
For a full list of faculty members and fellows please visit the department or program website.

Program Information

Information and Departmental Plan of Study

The Department of Music aims to give students a broad foundation for making, performing, studying, and writing about music. As part of the major, students pursue work in two loosely defined areas: Culture and Criticism (C&C) and Materials and Making (M&M). M&M encompasses topics usually explored in hands-on, exploratory ways, such as composition, improvisation, theory, analysis, and electronic music. The C&C area focuses on the scholarly study of music, from historical and formalist analysis to cognitive science and ethnography. Whether our concentrators ultimately choose to make music, to research and write about it, or do both, they are encouraged to develop independent work that moves across traditional disciplinary or methodological boundaries.

Advanced Placement

The Department of Music does not grant advanced placement exam credit. First-year students who wish to enroll in a course where "any music course" is listed as a prerequisite must obtain the permission of the director of undergraduate studies (DUS) or the course instructor.

Prerequisites

Students interested in the music concentration are required to gain exposure to coursework in both the Culture & Criticism and Materials & Making areas before entering the department. The prerequisites are satisfied through the completion of MUS 105, one M&M course, and one C&C course. Under special circumstances, students may be able to place out of MUS 105 by demonstrating equivalent knowledge in an exam given by the music faculty or scoring a 5 on the AP Music exam. Students who pass out of MUS 105 will be required to take an additional elective to meet the minimum requirement of 11 courses in the major.

Program of Study

Classes of 2022, 2023 and 2024:Concentrators are strongly encouraged to complete the requirements below, and are required to take the credit-bearing Junior Seminar. Students should consult the archived Undergraduate Announcement for details of the previous requirements.

Class of 2025 and beyond: Students majoring in music take a total of 11 courses in the major: three prerequisite courses (MUS 105, one M&M course, one C&C course); two additional courses in Culture & Criticism; two courses in Materials & Making (one of the three total M&M courses, including the M&M prerequisite, must include MUS 106, MUS 205, MUS 206, MUS 311, MUS 312 or an alternative approved by the DUS); three additional electives, two of which should be at the 300-level or higher; and a credit-bearing Junior Seminar (MUS 300). Music majors in the Program in Music Performance certificate may use one performance course (such as MPP 213, 214, 215, 216, 219) as a departmental. Concentrators design their program of study in close consultation with the director of undergraduate studies, and are strongly encouraged to meet with the DUS in their first year to plan potential paths through the curriculum, as some upper-level courses have their own prerequisites. In general, we encourage students to lead with their strengths but also to take risks and step out of their comfort zones, principles that should guide their course choices.

Languages

Students planning graduate study in music should achieve reading and speaking proficiency in at least one language. German, French, and Italian are most germane to the study of Western music. Some experience with composition software may also be of use.

Independent Work

Junior Seminar - MUS 300

A fall-term Junior Seminar introduces students to some of the methodological, technical, creative, and disciplinary issues entailed in the study and making of music. Assignments may relate to, or inform, their independent work, but will be graded separately from the JIW. Students who are abroad during the fall of the junior year can complete the Junior Seminar during the fall term of the senior year.

Junior Independent Work

Junior independent work begins in the fall, usually in the context of the Junior Seminar, and continues into the spring with a faculty adviser. The nature of this work can vary greatly, but for reference, it might consist of a research paper of approximately 30–40 pages, or an original composition of roughly 6–10 minutes (which would typically include a short paper detailing motivations and context for the composition). These are only guidelines, and the eventual scale of the work will depend on its nature. The specific goals for the project are worked out with a faculty advisor (identified during the fall semester), resulting in a proposal consisting of a summary of the project aims and context, an outline, and references to related work (bibliography for research papers, associated repertoire for compositions, and other material as appropriate to the project); this proposal should be submitted to the advisor and DUS before the end of fall semester, though the grade for the proposal will be held and included in the final grade for the year-long project.

Senior Independent Work

The senior independent work consists of a year-long project devised by the student and approved by a faculty adviser. Again, for reference, it might consist of a research paper of approximately 60–80 pages, or an original composition of roughly 12–20 minutes (again including a short accompanying paper), but the specific topics can vary widely, as described above; as with the JIW, these are only guidelines, and the eventual scale of the work will depend on its nature. Ideally, a faculty advisor will be identified in the spring of the junior year to help the student develop an appropriate scope for the project. The JIW and SIW topics need not be related, but often are. The thesis grade is the average of the grades given by the faculty adviser and a second faculty reader.

Senior Departmental Examination

On a date arranged by the Department, senior concentrators must take a final departmental examination. The senior thesis presentation includes an overview of the thesis focusing on motivation, methodology and result. The total duration of the presentation should not exceed 30 to 45 minutes. The presentation is immediately followed by 10 to 15 minutes of questions from the thesis advisor and others in attendance.

Study Abroad

Music concentrators are encouraged to explore the many study abroad opportunities offered at Princeton. Among these is the unique collaboration Princeton maintains with the Royal College of Music in London (link is external), in which students have the opportunity to participate in a five-year double-degree program (A.B. and M.M.). Students spend the fall semester of the junior year in London. Interested current and prospective music majors should email the director of the Certificate Program in Music Performance for further details.

Additional Information

Ensembles and Instrumental and Vocal Lessons

Concentrators are encouraged to take an active part in performing music. All concentrators have the opportunity to take vocal or instrumental lessons from world-class professionals on the performance faculty. For students majoring in music or pursuing a certificate in performance, the full cost of these lessons is paid for by the University (during the junior and senior years). Note that MPP 298-299, Independent Instruction in Voice or Instrument, can only be taken once. Students can also gain exposure to performance by participating in one of the Departmental Ensembles. For further information on lessons, ensembles, and performance opportunities, please contact department’s program manager.

Other Academic Preparation

Students planning graduate study in musicology or theory should achieve reading and speaking proficiency in at least one language, depending upon their areas of interest. Students with interests in composition may want preparation in engineering and computer science. Majors should discuss this with the DUS.

Certificate Program in Music Performance

This certificate encompasses music performance of many varieties, and includes tracks for composition and electronic music. For certificate requirements, see the description under Program in Music Performance.

 

 

Courses

MPP 213 Projects in Instrumental Performance Fall/Spring LA

Instrumental chamber music class of the standard repertory of the 17th, 18th, 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. Preparation for performance of ensembles. Each ensemble's repertoire will be determined in consultation with the instructors during the first week of classes. Instructed by: Staff

MPP 214 Projects in Vocal Performance (also
MTD 214
) LA

Guides students in extended projects in performance. Prerequisite: instructor's permission. Instructed by: Staff

MPP 215 Projects in Jazz Performance Fall LA

A performance course that focuses on the development of style, concept, and repertoire in the jazz idiom. Students are coached by faculty in extended projects in performance. Course will be taught by Jazz Pianist Angelica Sanchez. Instructed by: A. Sanchez

MPP 216 Techniques of Conducting LA

This course will focus on: 1) the development of competency in conducting technique, 2) verbal and non-verbal communication in rehearsal, 3) the study of choral repertoire of various styles and genres, emphasizing analysis and interpretation and 4) the development of good rehearsal strategies. Instructed by: G. Crouch

MUS 103 Introduction to Western Music Fall/Spring LA

MUS 103 is an introduction to Western music, involving works from around 1200 to the present. The course explains the basic elements of Western music -- rhythm, pitch, melody, harmony, form -- and historically significant styles and genres of composition. The course includes lectures on the symphony, ballet, and opera. Instructed by: S. Morrison

MUS 104 When Music Is Made LA

An introduction to the fundamental materials of a variety of musics, including Western concert music, jazz, and popular music. Course activities center around interrelated theoretical, compositional, and analytical projects that serve to explore issues of music theory, style, and creativity. Two lectures, two preceptorials. Instructed by: D. Dennehy

MUS 105 Music Theory through Performance and Composition Fall LA

An introduction to the procedures, structures, and aesthetics of tonal music. Composing, singing, playing, analysis of music such as 18th-century chorale, and 18th- and 19th-century piano music. Emphasis on fluency in handling tonal materials as a means of achieving a variety of formal and expressive ends. Two lectures, two classes, one session in practical musicianship. Instructed by: D. Dennehy, J. Seo

MUS 106 Music Theory through Performance and Composition Spring LA

An introduction to the procedures, structures, and aesthetics of tonal music. Composing, singing, playing, analysis of music such as 18th-century chorale, and 18th- and 19th-century piano music. Emphasis on fluency in handling tonal materials as a means of achieving a variety of formal and expressive ends. Two lectures, two classes, one session in practical musicianship. Prerequisite: ability to read music. Instructed by: D. Dennehy, J. Seo

MUS 205 Species Counterpoint Fall LA

An introduction to the principles of voice leading and linear construction through a series of systematic compositional exercises. Two lectures, two classes. Prerequisite: 106 or equivalent. Instructed by: A. Lovett, D. Trueman, J. Seo

MUS 206 Tonal Syntax Spring LA

An introduction to the syntactic structure of the music of the 18th and 19th centuries through exercises in analysis and composition. Two lectures, two classes. Prerequisite: 205 or equivalent. Instructed by: S. Mackey, D. Trueman, J. Seo

MUS 210 Beginning Workshop in Musical Composition LA

A continuous cycle of creation, discussion, and response based on the creative musical activity of the students. Varieties of kind and style--notated composition, multimedia music, multitracking, and improvisation--are encouraged. Prerequisite: instructor's permission. Two 90-minute classes. Instructed by: S. Mackey, J. Seo

MUS 220 The Opera (also
MTD 220
) LA

An introduction to opera. Lectures deal with works by major composers, conventions of libretto poetry, singers and voice types, musical forms and dramatic pacing, and opera staging. Classes are devoted to close study of two works and the plays on which they were based. Two lectures, one class. Prerequisite: any music course, or some musical background, or instructor's permission. Open to freshmen. Instructed by: W. Heller

MUS 221 Choral Music (also
REL 221
) LA

A survey of vocal literature (excluding opera) from the early Middle Ages to the present. Relations between text and music are stressed. The classes are devoted to a close study of two or three works. Two lectures, one class. Prerequisite: instructor's permission. Instructed by: Staff

MUS 225 Instrumental Music: The Symphony from Haydn to Stravinsky LA

A study of the development of the symphony from its origins in the mid-18th century through the first half of the 20th. Representative works will be chosen for detailed study in the class meetings. Two lectures, one class. Prerequisite: any music course, some musical background, or instructor's permission. Instructed by: W. Heller

MUS 230 Music in the Middle Ages (also
MED 230
) LA

Major developments of Western music up to about 1400, including some of the following: the origin and growth of chant, its liturgical context and musical properties; medieval secular song; early polyphony and Parisian organum; the French ars nova and Machaut; the Italian trecento; English medieval music. Prerequisite: a year of theory or instructor's permission. Instructed by: R. Wegman

MUS 232 Music in the Renaissance LA

Introduction to the history and current scholarship of European music in the period 1400-1600. The principal thread is compositional history; in addition, the course includes extensive coverage of these topics: aesthetics, orality/literacy, improvisation, gender and sexuality. Instructed by: R. Wegman

MUS 234 Music of the Baroque LA

An introductory survey of style developments, aesthetic trends affecting music, and principal vocal and instrumental genres (opera, cantata, concerto, sonata, and suite) of the period 1600-1750. Major figures to be considered include Monteverdi, Schütz, Lully, Corelli, Vivaldi, Handel, and J. S. Bach. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Prerequisite: any music course or instructor's permission. Instructed by: W. Heller

MUS 236 Music of the Classical Period LA

Introduction to the history of 18th-century music, giving equal attention to pre-Classical and Classical periods, and covering France, England and Italy as well as Germany. The course features Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven and numerous other significant figures. The chief narrative thread is the history of musical style and taste. A separate storyline running alongside this is the imaginative retelling of Dr. Charles Burney's musical journeys through Europe in the early 1770s. Extensive playlist and readings of contemporary texts (diaries, letters, travel accounts, music treatises, opera libretti, translated into English). Two lectures, one class. Instructed by: R. Wegman

MUS 240 Musical Modernism 1890-1945 LA

An introduction to modern music, beginning with its origins in late Romanticism, up to World War II. Composers considered include Mahler, Stravinsky, Debussy, Ravel, and Berg. Topics range from urban centers for modern music (Paris and Vienna), the relationship of musical modernism to contemporary literature and visual arts, music and politics, to the impact of recording technology and cinema on musical arts. Prerequisite: any music course, some classical music background, or instructor's permission. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Instructed by: S. Morrison

MUS 242 Music After Modernism, 1945 to the Present LA

European and American music since World War II. Study of many recent approaches to music and their cultural, social, and philosophical bases. Topics include: postwar European avant-garde, American extensions of serialism, technological developments, influences of popular and folk cultures, American avant-garde. Prerequisite: any music course, some musical background, or instructor's permission. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Instructed by: D. Dennehy

MUS 250 Musical Cultures of the World LA

Course explores aesthetic principles and social context underlying traditional and popular musics of various world regions, drawing on examples from South Africa, Japan, India, and Indonesia, among other places. Issues explored include conception of melody and rhythm in culture; the impact that language, pedagogical methods, patronage systems, gender, and ethnic or class identity have had on musical composition and performance; and the role of migration, globalization, and politics in the development of musical style. Instructed by: G. Steingo

MUS 251 Music and Film LA

An examination of the effect of different compositional practices and different sound technologies on the film viewer. The course will focus on three parameters of film music: music that has a visual point of origin on the screen (diegetic music), music that does not have a visual point of origin on the screen (nondiegetic music, also called background scoring), and music that floats between these two realms. Prerequisite: 103, or 105, or permission of instructor. One three-hour seminar. Instructed by: S. Morrison

MUS 258 Music of Africa (also
AFS 258
) LA

Introduction to the vocal and instrumental music of Africa south of the Sahara. Topics include the place of music in society, the influence of language on musical composition, principles of rhythmic organization, urban popular music, "art" music as a response to colonialism, and the impact of African music on the earliest forms of African American music. Two 90-minute lectures. Instructed by: Staff

MUS 260 Music Traditions in North America (also
AMS 309
) LA

This course will delve into the many historical themes, social issues, and musical aspects that arise from surveying and comparing the diverse musical traditions of Mexico, the U.S., and Canada. Instructed by: M. Velasco

MUS 262 Jazz History: Many Sounds, Many Voices (also
AAS 262
) Spring LA

An introduction survey examining the historical development of jazz from its African origins through the present. The course will place emphasis on the acquisition of listening skills and explore related musical and social issues. Instructed by: Staff

MUS 264 Urban Blues and the Golden Age of Rock LA

Examines post-World War II blues, rock music mostly of the late sixties and early seventies, and the connections between them. Explores wider musical and extramusical connections. Two lectures, one class. Instructed by: R. Wegman

MUS 270 Medieval and Renaissance Music from Original Notation (also
MED 270
) LA

A "hands-on" course that explores music from before 1600 using the pedagogical methods of the period. Medieval and Renaissance techniques of sight-singing, memorization, improvisation, and harmonization will be learned. Modern computer technology will also be used to investigate the deeper mystical and philosophical content of music from this period. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: ability to read modern music notation comfortably. Instructed by: J. Reuland

MUS 301 Special Topics in Contemporary Practice (See DAN 304)

MUS 308 Contemporary Music through Composition and Performance LA

An introduction to a variety of 20th-century approaches to composition. Emphasis on understanding different techniques, syntaxes, and musical languages through exercises in compositional emulations and in performance projects of student and studied works, using available performance skills of participants. Prerequisite: 206 or instructor's permission. One three-hour seminar, one preceptorial. Instructed by: S. Mackey

MUS 309 Topics in Tonal Analysis LA

The course will deal closely with a small number of works from the tonal repertoire and will serve as a critical introduction to several pertinent and influential analytical methodologies, including motivic, formal, semiotic, and voice-leading analysis. The focus will be on the musical and aesthetic values that each method either enhances or attenuates. Prerequisite: 206 or instructor's permission. One three-hour seminar. Instructed by: D. Trueman

MUS 310 Advanced Workshop in Musical Composition LA

An opportunity for students who have developed sufficient compositional skills to work on more extended and advanced projects. Three hours per week. Instructed by: D. Dennehy, S. Mackey

MUS 311 Jazz Theory through Improvisation and Composition I LA

An exploration of the melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic principles of the bebop paradigm. The course includes analysis of representative works by various jazz masters and will place a strong emphasis on student projects in improvisation and composition. Prerequisites: 105 or permission of instructor. Two 90-minute classes. Instructed by: Staff

MUS 314 Computer and Electronic Music through Programming, Performance, and Composition (also
COS 314
) QCR

An introduction to the fundamentals of computer and electronic music in the context of the Princeton Laptop Orchestra (PLOrk). The music and sound programming language ChucK, developed here at Princeton, will be used in conjunction with Max/MSP, another digital audio language, to study procedural programming, digital signal processing and synthesis, networking, and human-computer interfacing. Instructed by: D. Trueman, J. Snyder

MUS 316 Computer and Electronic Music Composition LA

Compositional projects involving computers and synthesizers. Some work may involve interactions between live and electronic sounds. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: 314 or permission of instructor. Instructed by: D. Trueman, J. Snyder

MUS 328 Special Topics in Performance Practice (See THR 330)

MUS 333 Bach and Handel LA

The contrasting careers and oeuvres of the two greatest representatives of the late baroque in music will be considered both individually and comparatively. Prerequisite: a year of theory or instructor's permission. Instructed by: W. Heller

MUS 339 Russian Music (also
SLA 311
) LA

A detailed survey of Russian national and international composers. Topics of discussion and analysis will include magic opera, realism, orientalism, the relationship between composers and poets of the Russian Symbolist era, the World of Art movement and the Ballets Russes, Soviet film music, Soviet arts doctrine, and musical aesthetics (especially as they pertain to authorship and identity). Prerequisites: 105 or permission of instructor. Two 90-minute classes. Instructed by: S. Morrison

MUS 430 Topics in History, Analysis, and Interpretation Fall LA

Topics chosen from, but not limited to: a group of works by a single composer (Leonin's organa, Monteverdi's madrigals, Brahms's symphonies); a certain genre (19th-century choral works, Hindustani Khayal, contemporary rock, late 16th-century madrigal); a specific theoretical or historical problem (atonal theory, composers' sketches and musical analysis, the origins of opera). One three-hour seminar. Instructed by: Staff

MUS 431 Topics in History, Analysis, and Interpretation Spring LA

Topics chosen from, but not limited to: a group of works by a single composer (Leonin's organa, Monteverdi madrigals, Brahms's symphonies); a certain genre (19th-century choral works, Hindustani Khayal, contemporary rock, late 16th-century madrigal); a specific theoretical or historical problem (atonal theory, composers' sketches and musical analysis, the origins of opera). One three-hour seminar. Instructed by: Staff

MUS 470 Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities (See HUM 470)