East Asian Studies

Program Offerings

Offering type
A.B.

In the contemporary global configuration, East Asia is a center of culture, economics, science and technology. The Department of East Asian Studies (EAS) offers a wide range of undergraduate classes at the highest standards of academic, linguistic and cultural competence focused on China, Korea and Japan. While the EAS major allows in-depth study and first-hand experience of East Asia, the minor programs in Chinese, Japanese or Korean language encourage students to combine their interests in East Asian languages and civilizations with other majors they pursue at Princeton.

EAS students complete coursework in literature, history, anthropology, media and cultural studies of China, Korea and Japan. They engage in both transnational and local perspectives, and their work spans premodern and contemporary contexts. The Chinese, Japanese and Korean language programs offer instruction from elementary to highly advanced levels. All language classes are taught exclusively by professional instructors and operate entirely in the primary language in terms of reading materials, classroom discussion and assignments. Students also have the opportunity to participate in the Princeton summer language programs Princeton in Beijing (Beijing, China), Princeton in Ishikawa (Kanazawa, Japan) and Princeton in Korea (Seoul, South Korea). 

Goals for Student Learning

The Department of East Asian Studies provides students with rigorous training in the study of China, Japan and Korea. The East Asian studies major builds on two pillars: rigorous language training that takes students beyond the third year in Chinese, Japanese or Korean, and diverse content courses that allow students to explore themes from ancient Chinese philosophy to Japanese anime to Korean women’s history. Its interdisciplinary curriculum is designed to provide a balance between broad-based knowledge of the region and deeper expertise in the languages and cultures of one or more of the region’s territories. The goal is for our students to gain proficiency with the challenging linguistic and analytical tools needed to conduct conscientious research, as well as to learn about the critical and theoretical models through which the region’s history and culture are interpreted. The core of this training is developed through guided coursework, of which language classes form a central part, and substantial independent work completed under the close auspices of faculty advisers.

Advanced Placement

Students seeking advanced placement should consult the director of undergraduate studies. All first-year students are welcome to take a language placement exam in Chinese, Japanese or Korean to determine their language proficiency in the summer before matriculation. 

Prerequisites

  1. One year of language study in one East Asian language
  2. One 200-level EAS course

Program of Study

Majors are required to achieve proficiency in one East Asian language through the third-year level, and take eight departmental courses. The departmentals must include the junior seminar (EAS 300); at least two of the five transnational courses (HIS/EAS 207, HIS/EAS 208, HUM/EAS/COM 233, HUM/EAS/COM 234, or EAS 229); and at least one course on premodern East Asia. A single course may not be used to satisfy two requirements, with the exception of HIS 207 and HUM 233, either of which may be used to satisfy the requirement of a course on premodern East Asia. A minimum of six of the eight departmentals must be EAS-prefixed courses. The remaining two may be language courses at or above the 300 level (after the three-year proficiency requirement is fulfilled), or any language courses in a second East Asian language.  

Departmental Course Requirements

Eight departmental courses fulfilling the following requirements:

Six EAS-prefix courses, which must include:

  1. The junior seminar (EAS 300) as an introductory methods survey course, generally taken fall of junior year.
  2. Two of the following transnational courses:
    • History of East Asia to 1800 (HIS/EAS 207)
    • East Asia since 1800 (HIS/EAS 208)
    • Contemporary East Asia (EAS 229)
    • East Asian Humanities I: The Classical Foundations (HUM/EAS/COM 233)
    • East Asian Humanities II: Tradition and Transformations (HUM/EAS/COM 234)
  3. At least one course on premodern East Asia. 
    • Note: Either HIS 207 or HUM 233, when taken in fulfillment of a transnational course (2), may also be used simultaneously toward the premodern requirement (3), however, the course will only count toward one of the six required EAS-prefix departmentals.

Two additional courses, which may be:

  1. EAS courses, including courses cross-listed with EAS.
  2. Cognate courses approved by the director of undergraduate studies
  3. Language courses at or above the 300 level (after the three-year proficiency requirement is fulfilled).
  4. Any courses in a second East Asian language.

Language Requirements

Language proficiency through the third year in one East Asian language.

Independent Work

Junior Year

In the fall term the student participates in the departmental junior seminar (EAS 300) and also writes a junior independent work. In the spring, the student writes a second junior independent work under the supervision of an appropriate faculty member. At the end of junior year, the student begins to draft a proposal for the senior thesis.

Senior Year

Each student prepares a senior thesis in consultation with an appropriate member of the faculty. The senior thesis represents the culmination of the undergraduate curriculum. It should be an original contribution to scholarship on East Asia, based at least in part on source materials in the student's language of specialization.

Scholarship aid is available for senior thesis research abroad. Students should review funding opportunities listed in the Student Activities Funding Engine (SAFE), and may also want to consult the websites of the Program in East Asian Studies (EAP) and the Office of the Dean of the College (ODOC) for further information.

Senior Departmental Examination

At the end of the spring term, the student appears before a faculty committee for an oral defense of the thesis. The defense will take the form of a conversation between the student and a faculty committee, and it will center on the senior independent work, as well as larger questions in the field of East Asian studies that inform it. Students will be asked to reflect on the process of their research: the original source of interest in their research topic; the process of fleshing out the architecture of their project; and difficulties and creative discoveries of their research and writing. The conversation will begin in the students’ primary research language: Korean, Japanese or Chinese.

Study Abroad

The Department of East Asian Studies offers varied opportunities for overseas study in East Asia. Major and non-major East Asian language students are encouraged to take advantage of intensive summer or year-long language study and/or internships. The programs hosted by East Asian studies are the intensive summer language programs, Princeton in Beijing (Chinese), Princeton in Ishikawa (Japanese), and Princeton in Korea (Korean). Upon graduation, students will normally be prepared to begin graduate work at a higher level because of such language experience and training. The department also encourages students to participate in extended internships or study programs in East Asia.

Scholarship aid is available to majors and non-majors for both summer language study and senior thesis research abroad. Students should review funding opportunities listed in the Student Activities Funding Engine (SAFE), and may also want to consult the websites of the Program in East Asian Studies (EAP), the Office of International Programs (OIP) and the Office of the Dean of the College (ODOC) for further information.

Additional Information

Certificates in Chinese, Japanese and Korean language and culture will transition to minors beginning with the Class of 2025. Please consult the minor program offering sections for updated information on the Chinese, Japanese and Korean language minors.

Information about the former certificate requirements can be found in the archived version of the Undergraduate Announcement.

For more information on the certificate/minor in East Asian studies, please consult the Program in East Asian Studies offerings website.

Faculty

  • Chair

    • Anna M. Shields
  • Director of Undergraduate Studies

    • Xin Wen
  • Director of Graduate Studies

    • Atsuko Ueda
  • Professor

    • Amy B. Borovoy
    • Janet Y. Chen
    • Thomas D. Conlan
    • Sheldon M. Garon
    • Martin Kern
    • Anna M. Shields
    • Atsuko Ueda
  • Associate Professor

    • He Bian
    • Ksenia Chizhova
    • Steven Chung
    • Paize Keulemans
    • Federico Marcon
    • Brian R. Steininger
  • Assistant Professor

    • Xin Wen
    • Trenton W. Wilson
    • Junko Yamazaki
  • Associated Faculty

    • Jonathan C. Gold, Religion
    • Thomas W. Hare, Comparative Literature
    • G. John Ikenberry, Schl of Public & Int'l Affairs
    • Bryan D. Lowe, Religion
    • Ryo Morimoto, Anthropology
    • James M. Raymo, Sociology
    • Stephen F. Teiser, Religion
    • Rory Truex, Schl of Public & Int'l Affairs
    • Cheng-hua Wang, Art and Archaeology
    • Andrew M. Watsky, Art and Archaeology
    • Yu Xie, Sociology
  • University Lecturer

    • Shinji Sato
  • Senior Lecturer

    • Ho Jung Choi
    • Tomoko Shibata
    • Yukari Tokumasu
    • Jing Wang
  • Lecturer

    • Jin Dong
    • Fang-Yen Hsieh
    • Luanfeng Huang
    • Xinyue Huang
    • TAE NA KIM
    • Susie Kim
    • Jue Lu
    • Yinqiu Ma
    • Hisae Matsui
    • Ying Ou
    • Zheyu Su
    • Megumi Watanabe
    • Fang Yan
    • Namseok Yong
    • Yuseon Yun
    • Jieyun Zhu
  • Visiting Professor

    • Nicola Di Cosmo

For a full list of faculty members and fellows please visit the department or program website.

Courses

CHI 1001 - Introductory Chinese I Spring

CHI 1001 and CHI 1002, are introductory Chinese courses for true beginners. This course will be taught at half the pace of instruction compared to Elementary Chinese (CHI 101/CHI 102). The goal of this course is to develop students' four basic communication skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing, using both the Pinyin system, and simplified Chinese characters. After taking CHI 1001 and CHI 1002, students will have developed basic abilities to handle simple survival situations in Chinese, to read and write over 300 Chinese characters, and be well prepared for more advanced and intensive study in Chinese. Three hours of class. Staff

CHI 1002 - Introductory Chinese II

Introductory Chinese (CHI 1002) is a continuation of CHI 1001, an introductory course for true beginners. It is taught at half the instructional pace of First Year Chinese (CHI 101). The goal of this course is to develop students' four basic communication skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing, using both the Pinyin Romanization phonetic system and simplified (modern) Chinese characters. By the end of this course, students will be able to handle simple "survival situations" in Chinese, read and write over 300 Chinese characters, and engage in more advanced and intensive study of Chinese in the future. Staff

CHI 101 - Elementary Chinese I Fall

An introductory course in modern spoken and written Chinese, stressing oral-aural facility and the integration of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Five hours of class. Staff

CHI 102 - Elementary Chinese II Spring

Continued study of modern spoken and written Chinese, stressing listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Five hours of class. Staff

CHI 103 - Intensive Elementary Chinese Fall

An intensive course covering CHI 101 and CHI 102 in one semester for beginning heritage learners and students with fair fluency and limited ability in reading and writing skills. This course will emphasize the integration of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.. Prerequisite: instructor's permission (oral interview in Chinese). Five hours of class. Staff

CHI 105 - Intermediate Chinese I Fall

A study of modern spoken and written Chinese, this course shifts the emphasis to the reading of contemporary Chinese dialogues and short essays on daily life topics. While reinforcing the knowledge students have acquired thus far, this course will further develop the students' audio-lingual proficiency and bring their reading and writing ability to a higher level. Five hours of class. Staff

CHI 107 - Intermediate Chinese II Spring

Continuing the study of modern spoken and written Chinese, this course shifts the emphasis to the reading of contemporary Chinese cultural and social issues. Five hours of class. Staff

CHI 107C - Intermediate Chinese II in Beijing

A four-week summer intensive language course taught in Beijing, China, at Beijing Normal University, which is a continuation of 105C. This course continues the intensive study of modern spoken and written Chinese and includes the study of modern cultural and social issues. Admission by application. Prerequisite: 105C or equivalent. Five two-hour classes, five two-hour drill sessions, plus individual tutorial sessions. Staff

CHI 108 - Intensive Intermediate Chinese Spring

An intensive course that covers 105 and 107 in one semester for students who have completed CHI 103. This course will emphasize reading and writing skills and the analysis of grammar. After CHI 108, students are ready for third-year courses.. Prerequisite: CHI 103 or instructor's permission. Five hours of class. Staff

CHI 301 - Introduction to Classical Chinese I Fall HA

CHI 301 provides basic training for students in classical Chinese and introduces students to theme-based readings about important cultural aspects of pre-modern China, such as the concept of Dao, life and death, Confucian ethics, etc. Each theme consists of passages selected from Chinese classics and short essays or stories full of wisdom and wit from later dynasties. This course will not only improve your four skills in Chinese language (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) but will also enhance your understanding of traditional Chinese philosophy and culture. Three hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Staff

CHI 302 - Introduction to Classical Chinese II Spring HA

Following CHI 301, the purpose of this course is to introduce the fundamental grammar of classical Chinese and to read short, original texts from different periods and genres. It also provides theme-based readings about important cultural aspects of pre-modern China, such as conceptions of filial piety, warfare, conflicts between righteousness and profit. Questions such as these were at the heart of Chinese intellectual debates. Three hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Staff

CHI 303 - Third-Year Modern Chinese I Fall

Designed to further develop the student's overall language skills through reading and discussion of contemporary affairs in both China and the U.S. in the form of dialogue and short essays. Prerequisite: CHI 105-107, or instructor's permission. Four hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Staff

CHI 304 - Third-Year Modern Chinese II Spring

A continuation of CHI 303, designed to improve the student's facility in written and oral expression through a close study of short essays selected and composed for advanced level students. Discussion topics are closely related to contemporary Chinese society. Prerequisite: CHI 303 or instructor's permission. Four hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Staff

CHI 305 - Intensive Third-Year Modern Chinese I Fall

Chinese 305 will further develop student's overall language skills through readings and discussion of contemporary issues published in Chinese media. This course is designed for students who have familiarity with spoken Mandarin or any Chinese dialect. Four hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Staff

CHI 306 - Intensive Third-Year Modern Chinese II Spring

A continuation of CHI 305, designed to further improve the student's facility in written and oral expression through a close study of essays selected and composed for advanced level students. Prerequisite: CHI 305 or instructor's permission. Four hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Staff

CHI 401 - Advanced Classical Chinese I Not offered this year LA

Intensive introduction to classical Chinese through the study of selections from ancient texts. Four hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Staff

CHI 402 - Advanced Classical Chinese II Not offered this year LA

Continuation of CHI 401. Intensive introduction to classical Chinese through the study of selections from ancient texts. Four hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Staff

CHI 403 - Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I Fall

Reading and discussion of selections from Chinese media on contemporary Chinese political, economic, and social issues. Prerequisite: CHI 304 or instructor's permission. Four hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Staff

CHI 404 - Fourth-Year Modern Chinese II Spring

A continuation of 403. Reading and discussion of scholarly writings in the fields of Chinese literature and modern Chinese intellectual history. Four hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite: 403, or instructor's permission. Staff

CHI 405 - Intensive Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I Fall

CHI 405 is an intensive, advanced Chinese class designed for heritage learners. It consists of reading and discussion based on newspaper articles and essays by famous Chinese intellectuals on contemporary Chinese political, economic, and social issues. Students will also study Chinese literary writings. Prerequisite: CHI 306 or instructor's permission. Four hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Staff

CHI 406 - Intensive Fourth-Year Modern Chinese II Spring

Continued reading and discussion of social and cultural challenges China has faced in recent years and various aspects of contemporary Chinese society. Students will also read and discuss substantive issues that modern Chinse intellectuals have faced. Prerequisite: CHI 405 or instructor's permission. Four hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Staff

CHI 411 - Readings in Modern Chinese Intellectual History (also EAS 411) Fall LA

This course is designed for students who have had advanced training in modern Chinese. Readings will focus on modern Chinese intellectual history. Topics will include language reform, women's emancipation, the encounter of western civilization, the rise of communism, etc. Prerequisite: CHI 404/406 or advanced proficiency level in Chinese or instructor's permission. Three hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Staff

CHI 412 - Readings in Classic Chinese Short Stories (also EAS 412) Spring LA

Focuses on reading and discussing selections from Feng Menglong's Sanyan, the most popular and well-known collection of Classic Chinese short stories published in the late sixteenth century. Prerequisite: CHI 404/406 or advanced proficiency level in Chinese or instructor's permission. Staff

CHI 418 - Advanced Chinese: Contemporary Literature and Film Spring LA

This course is designed for students who have learned Chinese for three or more years. The goal is not only to improve student's ability to listen, speak, read and write in Chinese, but also to introduce them to the intellectual and literary development of China after 1949 by sampling literary masterpieces and representative movies. Genres covered in this course include critical essays, short stories, poetry, and visual arts such as posters and film. Through class discussion and writing assignments of formal essays with more advanced vocabulary, students will increase their Chinese skill to a new level. Staff

CHI 452C - Fifth-Year Modern Chinese II in Beijing

A four-week summer intensive language course taught in Beijing, China, at Beijing Normal University, which is a continuation of 451C. Continued readings and discussion on modern Chinese literature, film, and intellectual history. This course, which is designed to bring students to near-native competence in all aspects of modern Chinese, prepares students for advanced research or employment in a variety of China-related fields. Admission by application. Prerequisite: 451C or equivalent. Five two-hour classes, five two-hour drill sessions, plus individual tutorial sessions. Staff

EAS 207 - History of East Asia to 1800 (also HIS 207/MED 207) Fall HA

EAS 208 - East Asia since 1800 (also HIS 208) Spring HA

EAS 213 - Aesthetics and Politics of Chinese Painting (also ART 216) Not offered this year LA

EAS 217 - The Arts of Japan (also ART 217) Not offered this year LA

EAS 218 - The Origins of Japanese Culture and Civilization: A History of Japan until 1600 (also HIS 209/MED 209) Spring HA

This course is designed to introduce the culture and history of Japan, and to examine how one understands and interprets the past. In addition to considering how a culture, a society, and a state develop, we will try to reconstruct the tenor of life in "ancient" and "medieval" Japan and chart how patterns of Japanese civilization shifted through time. T. Conlan

EAS 219 - Japanese Literature to 1800: The Major Texts Spring LA

This course provides an introduction to the Japanese literary tradition, with a focus on narratives of passion and renunciation. Love poems are found among the earliest Japanese writings, but they stand side-by-side with Buddhist-influenced works that stress the suffering inherent in emotional attachment. We will trace this binary of longing and denial through early folksongs, palace gossip, pious sermons, and ghostly pantomimes, against the changing backdrop of Japan's social and intellectual history. No knowledge of Japanese required. B. Steininger

EAS 221 - Introduction to Modern Japanese Literature Not offered this year LA

The course will cover major writers and works of the 20th century. We will examine how Japanese writers responded to modern fictional and linguistic forms imported from the West, how they negotiated what they had inherited from their long and illustrious literary past, and how postwar writers view their newly "democratized" world. A. Ueda

EAS 225 - Japanese Society and Culture (also ANT 323) Fall SA

An exploration of Japanese labor, gender and feminism, crime and social control, race and notions of homogeneity, nationalism and youth culture. The course considers Japan's struggle to come to terms with the West while at the same time integrating its past. It also looks at American misperceptions of Japanese society and economics. Two lectures, one preceptorial. A. Borovoy

EAS 226 - The Religions of China (also REL 226) Spring EM

EAS 228 - Religion in Japanese Culture (also REL 228) Not offered this year HA

EAS 231 - Chinese Martial Arts Classics: Fiction, Film, Fact Not offered this year LA

This course provides an overview of Chinese martial arts fiction and film from earliest times to the present day. The focus will be on the close-reading of literary, art-historical, and cinematic texts, but will also include discussion of the significance of these works against their broader historical and social background. Topics to be discussed: the literary/cinematic pleasure of watching violence, the relationship between violence and the law, gender ambiguity and the woman warrior, the imperial and (trans)national order of martial arts cinema, and the moral and physical economy of vengeance. P. Keulemans

EAS 232 - Introduction to Chinese Literature Spring LA

The development of classical Chinese literature, traced through close readings of original texts in English translation. Topics include the nature of the Chinese language and writing system, classical literary thought, religious and philosophical influences, dominance of poetry, emergence of historical writing, and vernacular fiction. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

EAS 233 - East Asian Humanities I: The Classical Foundations (also COM 233/HUM 233) Fall EM

EAS 234 - East Asian Humanities II: Traditions and Transformations (also COM 234/HUM 234) Spring EM

EAS 281 - Zen Buddhism (also REL 280) Spring CDEM

EAS 282 - A Documents-based Approach to Asian History (also HIS 282) Not offered this year HA

EAS 300 - Junior Seminar Fall

Designed to introduce departmental majors, in the fall of their junior year, to the tools, methodologies, and topics related to the study of East Asian history and culture. The focus of the course will vary each year, and will be cross-national and multidisciplinary, covering both premodern and modern periods. One three-hour seminar. X. Wen

EAS 301 - The Passionate Eye: Documentary Film in East Asia Not offered this year LA

The seminar will encourage students to think critically about the documentary as artistic medium and as socio-political practice. Some important questions will focus on the form itself: who has produced and watched these films and through what sorts of technologies? What are the codes through which documentaries make sense of their subjects and how do these change? Other questions will have wider scope: how can filmmaking impact politics and culture? How does it deal with the gap between reality and representation? What are the ethical issues of such work? What, if anything, is distinct about the life of documentary films in East Asia? S. Chung

EAS 304 - Translating East Asia (also COM 373/HUM 333/TRA 304) Fall CDLA

EAS 308 - Communism and Beyond: China and Russia (also RES 308/SOC 308) Spring SA

EAS 310 - Empire to Nation: 20th Century Japanese Fiction and Film Fall LA

This course will examine modern Japanese fiction and film that engaged with Japan's shift from "empire" to "nation" (roughly from 1930s to 1960s) with a specific focus on identity formation via race, ethnicity, and nationalism. A. Ueda

EAS 312 - Mind, Body, and Bioethics in Japan and Beyond (also ANT 312) Fall EM

The seminar will examine key concepts of the mind, the body, and the nature-culture distinction. We will study these issues in the context of Japanese beliefs about the good society, making connections between "lay culture," Japanese notions of social democracy, and "science culture." Topics include: styles of care for the mentally ill, the politics of disability, notions of human life and death, responses to bio-technology, the management of human materials (such as organs), cultural definitions of addiction and "co-dependency," and the ethics of human enhancement. A. Borovoy

EAS 320 - Early Japanese History Not offered this year HA

The history of Japan from the origins of the Japanese people to the establishment of Tokugawa rule in 1600, using the epic war tale The Tale of the Heike as a lens. Particular emphasis will be placed on institutional and cultural history. One three-hour seminar. T. Conlan

EAS 321 - Early Modern Japan (also HIS 321) Not offered this year HA

The history of Japan during the period of Samurai rule. Distinctive features of Tokugawa society and culture from the foundation of the regime in 1600 to its decline in the 19th century, the opening of Japan to Western contact, the course of economic development, and the consolidation of the Meiji State. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

EAS 322 - Buddhism in Japan (also REL 322) Not offered this year HA

EAS 324 - 20th-Century Japan (also HIS 322) Fall HA

EAS 331 - Chinese Poetry (also COM 331) LA

Close reading of classical Chinese poetry through transliteration, word-to-word explication, notes on allusions and background, and literal translation. Discussion of Chinese theories of poetry and the comparison between Chinese and Western poetic traditions. Knowledge of the Chinese language is not required or expected. One three-hour seminar. Staff

EAS 334 - Modern Chinese Literature and Film Not offered this year LA

Analysis through selected literary and cinematic works of authors' ideas, hopes, and worries about the fate of modern China. Consideration of literary and cinematic technique as well as the larger historical context. Readings in English. P. Keulemans

EAS 342 - Southeast Asia's Global History (also HIS 342/NES 343) Spring HA

EAS 343 - Modern Japanese Literature: Early Years Not offered this year LA

An introduction to major literary works in the early modern period when Japanese literature was attempting to re-establish itself through Western influences. Readings in English translation include works by Ogai, Soseki, Ichiyo, Toson, and Shiga. Topics include the evolution of modern Japanese fiction vis-a-vis the modernization of Japan, representations of self, individualism, and nationalism. A. Ueda

EAS 344 - Postwar Japanese Narrative: Modern to Postmodern (also COM 344) Spring LA

A critical survey of important literary, critical, and popular texts in postwar Japan. Readings and discussion of translated texts by writers and thinkers such as Kawabata, Oe, Maruyama, and Abe as well as by lesser-known women writers, avant-garde poets, and comic writers. Topics include the impact of war and urbanization, existentialism, ethnicity, postmodernism, and feminism. One three-hour seminar. A. Ueda

EAS 346 - The Chinese Economy (also ECO 379) Not offered this year SA

EAS 349 - North Korean Imaginaries Not offered this year SA

North Korea is the subject of an array of often contradictory political and aesthetic representations, each of which make claims to truth. This course sets out to scrutinize these very real and productive imaginaries. Primary engagements will include official speeches and documents, artistic productions and defector testimonies from North Korea, as well as historical research, policy analysis, journalism, and non-state activities from outside the nation's borders. The task of understanding this most troubled of states will be challenged by visits from journalists, former intelligence or policy consultants, defectors, and religious groups. S. Chung

EAS 351 - Korean Cinema Not offered this year LA

This is a broad historical examination of Korean cinema from both sides of the DMZ. We start with some rare surviving colonial period films and work our way to the very recent films of the "Korean wave" era. Our thermatic focus will be post-coloniality, ideological division, war, national reconstruction, democratization, and intensified global capitalism; our critical focus will be on problems of nation, class, and gender. At the heart of work for the course will be attention to the films themselves, where we will try to account critically for shifts in style and form. S. Chung

EAS 354 - Early Modern China (also HIS 324) Not offered this year HA

EAS 355 - China, 1850 to the Present (also HIS 325) Not offered this year HA

EAS 356 - Chinese Cinema (also ART 350) Not offered this year LA

EAS 357 - Traditional Chinese Architecture (also ARC 310/ART 351) Not offered this year LA

EAS 358 - Japanese Mythology (also REL 323) Spring CDHA

EAS 362 - Chinese Politics (also POL 362/SPI 323) Not offered this year SA

EAS 370 - Brainwashing, Conversion and Other Technologies of Belief Contagion Not offered this year SA

The seminar explores conversion in media discourses and practices of the Cold War, with a focus on Asia. Conversion is approached as a protean figure spanning religious doctrine, forces of economic mobility, cross-cultural encounters, and states of political subjectivity. Its media forms include portrayals of brainwashing, control of networks and content, and ideas about media's hypnotic power. The seminar inquires into how conversion attained heightened conceptual force during the Cold War and will examine quasi-scientific notions of brainwashing, the proliferation of religious cults, and the hardening of ideological binarism. S. Chung

EAS 376 - A Global History of Monsters (also HIS 334/HUM 335) Fall CDHA

EAS 415 - Intellectual History of China to the Fifth Century (also HIS 444) Fall EM

Considers the developing repertoire of ideas in China to the end of the Chin period, with key philosophical, political, ethical, and scientific concepts treated in terms of their social context and subsequent influence. One three-hour seminar. A prior course in East Asian studies is desirable but not required. Staff

EAS 416 - Intellectual History of China from the Ninth to the 19th Century Spring HA

The main facets and changes in the outlook of the intellectual elite in society and politics from the establishment of the literati in the 11th century to their survival under the Manchu conquest and incursions from Western powers. The focus is on the preservation of cultural integrity in the face of internal and external political and ideological challenges. One three-hour seminar. A prior course in East Asian studies is desirable but not required. Staff

EAS 423 - Landscape Art in China (also ART 423) Not offered this year LA

EAS 425 - The Japanese Print (also ART 425) Not offered this year LA

JPN 101 - Elementary Japanese I Fall

An introduction to modern Japanese stressing oral-aural facility but including an introduction to written Japanese. Two classes, three hours of drill and conversation. No credit is given for JPN 101 unless followed by JPN 102. Staff

JPN 102 - Elementary Japanese II Spring

A continuation of 101. An introduction to modern Japanese still stressing oral-aural facility but including an introduction to written Japanese. Prerequisite: JPN 101. Five 50-minutes classes. Staff

JPN 105 - Intermediate Japanese I Fall

Continued study of modern Japanese by consistent review and reinforcement of major grammatical points and more advanced vocabulary and grammar. This course will develop conversational as well as reading and writing skills. Prerequisite: JPN 102 or equivalent. Five 50-minute classes. Staff

JPN 107 - Intermediate Japanese II Spring

A continuation of JPN 105. The course aims at a thorough mastery of modern Japanese by consistent review and reinforcement of major grammatical points. Emphasis will increasingly be on reading; however oral work will still comprise fundamental aspect of the course. Prerequisite: JPN 105 or equivalent. Five 50-minute classes. Staff

JPN 301 - Advanced Japanese I Fall

Further reading in modern written Japanese with subsidiary grammatical and oral-aural training. The course covers some authentic materials and includes videotaped materials to increase oral-aural comprehension. Three 80-minute classes. Staff

JPN 302 - Advanced Japanese II Spring

A continuation of 301. Further reading in modern written Japanese with subsidiary grammatical and oral-aural training. The course covers some authentic materials and includes videotaped materials to increase oral-aural comprehension. Prerequisite: JPN 301. Three 80-minute classes. Staff

JPN 305 - Integrative Advanced Japanese I Fall

Designed to enhance reading, writing, and oral skills of students who need class work to achieve proficiency. Prerequisites: JPN 302 or its equivalent. Two 90-minute classes. T. Shibata

JPN 306 - Integrative Advanced Japanese II Spring

A continuation of JPN 305. Designed to enhance reading, writing, and oral skills of students who need class work to achieve advanced proficiency level. Prerequisites: JPN 305 or its equivalent. Two 90-minutes classes. T. Shibata

JPN 401 - Readings in Modern Japanese I (also EAS 401) Fall

This course is targeted to students whose Japanese proficiency is at an advanced or superior level. Students will discuss various issues using dramas, short novels, and editorials, and learn Japanese in academic or professional settings. Prerequisite: JPN 306 or equivalent. Two 90-minute classes. Staff

JPN 402 - Readings in Modern Japanese II (also EAS 402) Spring

Selected readings from short stories, essays, and newspapers. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: 401 or instructor's permission. Staff

JPN 403 - Introduction to Classical Japanese Fall

Introduction to the fundamentals of classic Japanese grammar. This course trains students to read premodern Japanese historical and literary texts. Texts: Taketori monogatari, Makura no soshi, Tosa nikki, etc. Prerequisite: two years of modern Japanese. Three hours. K. Ono

JPN 404 - Readings in Classical Japanese Spring HA

Close reading of selected premodern Japanese texts from Nara to Meiji. Texts: Oku no hosomichi, Uji shui monogatari, etc. Prerequisite: 403 or instructor's permission. Three hours. K. Ono

JPN 405 - Readings in Selected Fields I Not offered this year

Designed to give students who have had advanced training in modern Japanese an opportunity for directed readings in their own fields. Three classes. Prerequisite: 402 or instructor's permission. Staff

JPN 406 - Readings in Selected Fields II Not offered this year

Designed to give students who have had advanced training in modern Japanese an opportunity for directed readings in their own fields. Three classes. Prerequisite: 402 or instructor's permission. Staff

JPN 407 - Contemporary Japanese Language and Culture I Fall

This course emphasizes continued development of the four skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) used in academic or professional settings. Materials include novels, essays, reports, films, and documentaries. Prerequisite: JPN 402 or equivalent. Staff

JPN 408 - Contemporary Japanese Language and Culture II Spring

A continuation of JPN 407. This course emphasizes continued development of the four skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) used in academic or professional settings. Materials include novels, essays, reports, films, and documentaries. Prerequisite: JPN 407 or equivalent. Staff

KOR 101 - Elementary Korean I Fall

Elementary Korean is designed for beginning students who intend to build a solid foundation for further study in the Korean language. The course provides four balanced language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing - needed for basic communication. It emphasizes the ability to use Korean appropriately and introduces students to useful information concerning culture and daily life in Korea. Staff

KOR 102 - Elementary Korean II Spring

A continuation of KOR 101. Continued development of proficiency in basic communication by balancing four language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Staff

KOR 103 - Intensive Korean I Fall

The first part of Intensive Korean is designed for heritage students who have already had considerable amount of exposure to the Korean language and culture but have not received any formal instruction before their arriving at Princeton. It covers the Elementary Korean material focusing on vocabulary building, grammar, reading and writing. Staff

KOR 105 - Intermediate Korean I Fall

Intermediate Korean is designed for students who have learned the basics of the Korean language and want to improve their competence to a higher level. Complex sentences and grammar are covered while the basics are reviewed. Balancing four language skills -- listening, speaking, reading, and writing -- is emphasized. Staff

KOR 107 - Intermediate Korean II Spring

A continuation of KOR 105. Continued development of four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) in Korean. Complex grammatical structures and irregularities are taught while the basics are reviewed. Idiomatic expressions are introduced. Journals are kept for writing practice. Staff

KOR 108 - Intensive Korean II Spring

A continuation of KOR 103, this course covers the Intermediate Korean material focusing on complex grammatical structures, reading, and writing. Journals are kept for writing practice. Staff

KOR 301 - Advanced Korean I Fall

Advanced Korean is designed to develop fluency in both oral and literary skills. Expansion of vocabulary, practice in reading comprehension as well as active skills of conversation and writing are stressed through short readings and class discussion. Readings include different styles of writings on various topics including Korean culture, society, and history. Staff

KOR 302 - Advanced Korean II Spring

A continuation of KOR 301. Continued development of proficiency in speaking and reading through short readings and class discussion. Vocabulary learning and discourse skills are emphasized. Staff

KOR 303 - Integrative Korean I Fall

Integrative Korean course is designed to promote students' proficiency to the advanced-mid level and to enhance their continued development of literacy skills in Korean. Various authentic reading and audiovisual materials are reviewed in class discussion, presentation skills are emphasized, and a wider range of formal vocabulary is introduced. Staff

KOR 308 - Integrative Korean II Spring

A continuation of KOR 303. Focusing on stabilizing literacy development through a variety of authentic reading materials, class discussions, presentations, and various writing assignments. Expanding advanced-level vocabulary is also emphasized. Staff

KOR 401 - Contemporary Korean Language and Culture I Fall

The fifth-year Korean language course is designed to accelerate students' proficiency to the high-advanced level and to promote a deeper level of understanding of contemporary Korea and its people. A wide range of social, cultural and economic issues are covered through the use of various media resources (e.g., dramas, films, songs, commercials, newspapers, websites) as well as short essays. Classroom discussions are conducted in Korean. Staff

KOR 402 - Contemporary Korean Language and Culture II Spring LA

Reading and discussion of thoughts and issues related to the contemporary Korean society. Readings drawn from a variety of sociocultural and historical as well as sociolinguistic topics include family, marriage, education, technology and changes in the Korean language. Class discussions are conducted in Korean. Staff

KOR 405 - Readings in Modern Korean l (also EAS 405) Fall LA

The sixth-year Korean language course is designed to advance students' reading and writing skills to the superior level and to promote a deeper understanding of the Korean language, culture, society, and history. Readings cover various types of authentic materials (e.g., editorials, think pieces, essays, and contemporary literary short stories). Discussion and presentation skills in formal settings (i.e., academic and professional) are also emphasized. Class discussions are conducted in Korean. Staff

KOR 407 - Readings in Modern Korean II (also EAS 406) Spring LA

Continued development of literacy skills to the superior level. Focusing on critical thinking through reading and writing in Korean. The course covers a wide range of sociocultural and political as well as sociolinguistic issues presented in classic short stories, poems, and historical texts. A term project is assigned for the second half of the course. Staff