Politics

Program Offerings

Offering type
A.B.

Goals for Student Learning

The Department of Politics expects students to accomplish each of the following key learning goals by the time of graduation:

  • Show command of the language of political science and politics in several of its subfields.
  • Understand the methods commonly used in several of its subfields.
  • Learn the material for one subfield at a level of expertise and practical application necessary to understand the scholarly discourse.
  • Command a set of tools appropriate to conduct independent and original research in one subfield. These tools differ by subfield (see below).
  • Understand the political, historical, institutional context pertaining to a particular topic of research sufficiently to conduct independent and original research in that subfield.

Prerequisites

Normally, students entering the department must have successfully completed at least two courses offered by the Department of Politics on a graded basis before the end of sophomore year. The first two courses taken in politics are considered prerequisites. Prerequisites may not be taken as pass/D/fail. Courses taken as prerequisites will be counted as departmentals and may be used to fulfill distribution requirements. It is strongly recommended that one or both of the prerequisites be at the 200 level.

In addition, on a case-by-case basis, the DUS will consider counting a course taught by a regular politics faculty in another department that is not cross-listed with politics for departmental credit. If appropriate, such a departmental course may be approved to count as a prerequisite, and toward the 3-2-1 requirement, under the discretion of the DUS.

Effective with the Class of 2025, only one of the two prerequisites may be an analytical course (e.g., POL 345). For example: (1) If a student has taken POL 345 and POL 346 as their first two politics courses, a third politics course will be required — one of which must not include a course that counts as meeting the department's analytical requirement (e.g., POL 250, POL 345, POL 347, etc.), OR (2) A student who has taken SOC 245/POL 245 and POL 345 as their first two politics courses will be required to take a third departmental in order to declare the major by the end of sophomore year. 

Program of Study

Course Selection

Class of 2024: By the end of senior year, all students in the department must complete no fewer than 10 departmental courses, of which two may be cognates. The two prerequisites as well as a course that satisfies the analytical requirement are included within the overall count of 10 departmentals. All departmentals must be taken on a graded basis — pass/D/fail is not allowed. Students must receive a passing grade in at least 10 of the courses that count as departmentals. Students must attain an overall average of C or higher in the 10 or more graded courses that count as departmentals. All departmentals factor into the honors calculation.

Class of 2025 and beyond: By the end of senior year, all students in the department must complete no fewer than 11 departmental courses, of which two may be cognates. The two prerequisites, the completion of POL 300 (see below), as well as a course that satisfies the analytical requirement are included within the overall count of 11 departmentals. Students must attain an overall average of C or higher in the 11 or more graded courses that count as departmentals. For a departmental to fulfill a requirement, it must be taken for a grade. All departmentals factor into the honors calculation.

Politics majors indicate a prospective primary field when they sign into the department in the spring of their sophomore year. Majors must take courses in at least three of the fields listed below — a minimum of three courses in their designated primary field, two courses in a secondary field and one course in a tertiary field. One of three courses in the primary field normally is a 200-level course. Prerequisites may be used to satisfy field distribution requirements. A course taken to satisfy the analytical requirement cannot be used to satisfy a field distribution requirement. 

The department's website lists additional courses that will fulfill field requirements in a given year, including one-time-only courses. It also lists topics courses offered by other departments that have POL cross-listings and that therefore can be counted as departmental courses.

  1. Political Theory: The PT subfield focuses on the nature of justice, democracy, power and other key ideas, and encourages students to develop frameworks for thinking evaluatively about pressing issues of politics and public policy of the day. POL 210, 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 307, 308, 309, 313, 315, 316, 321, 403, 410, 411, 412, 413, 416.
     
  2. American Politics: The AP subfield focuses on the U.S. political system and includes the study of the development of the American system of governance, American political institutions, the attitudes and behaviors of U.S. residents and the relationship between institutions and people. POL 220, 314, 315, 316, 318, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 327, 329, 330, 333, 343, 344, 349, 392, 420, 421, 422, 423.
     
  3. Comparative Politics: The CP subfield focuses on the similarities and differences in patterns of politics around the world with attention to what happens within states regarding representation, economic development, violence and effective government. POL 230, 349, 351, 352, 355, 356, 360, 362, 364, 366, 367, 374, 375, 378, 386, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 479.
     
  4. International Relations: The IR subfield focuses on the study of politics among nations and nonstate actors in world affairs, including subjects such as the causes of war, the role of international law and institutions, economic interdependence and cooperation to advance common goals for human rights and environmental protection. POL 240, 313, 380, 381, 385, 386, 388, 392, 393, 440, 441, 442, 443.
     
  5. Methods in Political Science (cannot be the primary field): These courses in formal and quantitative methods provide undergraduate students with analytical tools they can use to conduct rigorous social science research. POL 250, 345, 346, 347, 450.

Analytical Requirement

The department maintains a list of politics courses that have an emphasis on methodological tools for research in political science. Majors are required to take a course to fulfill the analytical requirement, normally no later than the first term of their junior year. The courses used to fulfill the analytical requirement cannot be used to fulfill primary, secondary or tertiary field requirements. The analytical requirement may be satisfied by POL 250, POL 345, POL 346, or POL 347. We will also accept ANT 301, ANT 302, ECO 202, ECO 302, ECO 312, ORF 245, PHI 201, SOC 404, or SPI 200.

POL 300

Politics majors are required to complete POL 300 (Conducting Independent Research in Political Science) in the fall semester of junior year, beginning with the Class of 2025. POL 300 is designed to complement the fall junior independent work requirement and will count for course credit.

Upon course registration, students will need to select one of two tracks for the lecture component of POL 300. The technical track (L01) builds on preparation for political analysis offered by POL 345; it's open to juniors who completed POL 345 or equivalent courses (e.g., ECO 202, ORF 245) before junior year. The conceptual track (L02) has no prerequisites and doesn't presume fulfillment of the analytical requirement. Both tracks cover many of the same topics. L02 focuses less on underlying statistics than L01, and may be more appropriate for students interested in qualitative/historical/political theory work.

Cognates

Cognates are courses offered in departments other than politics that have a substantial political content, which is defined as having at least 50% politics content. Unless approved for a special program (see below), students are permitted to count up to two cognates as departmental courses. The department maintains a list of all approved cognates for each student. A cognate must be approved by the last day of classes in the semester in which it is taken (except in spring semester of senior year, when the deadline is the second Friday of classes). With the exception of courses taken outside of politics that satisfy the analytical requirement, or upper-level courses taken in economics to fulfill the requirements of the track in political economy, courses taken in the first year or sophomore year cannot be approved as cognates. Cognate courses should not be at the introductory level. Cognates cannot be used to satisfy field distribution requirements. To seek approval for a cognate, students must complete the politics cognate approval application and email it along with a current syllabus to the cognate approval adviser for their review. Once a cognate has been approved, it may not be rescinded. Approved cognates must be taken for a grade and will be used in the departmental honors calculation.

Students who wish to combine the study of politics with the study of another discipline or a specific geographic area may design a special program that would allow them to count three cognates as departmentals. Politics and religion, politics and psychology, public policy and bioethics, and the politics of the Near East are examples of special plans of study. Individual areas of study must be approved by the department. Normally, a student must submit a written proposal to the cognate approval adviser by the end of the junior year. The proposal should demonstrate how the three cognates relate to one another and form a coherent interdisciplinary program.

Graduate Courses

Well-prepared undergraduates may take graduate seminars for full university and departmental credit. To enroll in a graduate seminar, the student must first obtain the signature approval of the instructor in charge, the DUS, and their residential college dean using this form.

Departmental Tracks

The Department of Politics offers four departmental tracks that provide more focused guidance to students who wish to address themes that bridge the subfields. Only students who declare their major in politics are eligible to pursue these tracks. Students should inform the undergraduate program manager of their intention to pursue a track during the sophomore declaration period, and no later than February 1 of their junior year. Students who select a track will still need to fulfill the requirements of a politics major. The tracks provide additional guidance for structuring the program of study as a politics major, but students are not required to select a track to graduate with a degree in politics. Courses may simultaneously fulfill both the track requirements and the politics major requirements. All courses taken to satisfy a track must be a on a graded basis and will factor into the honors calculation. (Please note: The degree will read A.B. in politics and, unlike university certificates, the departmental track will not appear on the transcript. Majors who successfully complete the track’s requirements will receive a departmental attestation on Class Day.)

Track in American Ideas and Institutions

The Department of Politics, in collaboration with the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions, offers the track in American ideas and institutions (AIIP) for students who wish to further demonstrate their understandings of the three branches of the federal government and the values, ideas and theories that underlie them and are animated by their workings. It draws together a menu of courses from American politics, political theory, public law and other departmental offerings.

Requirements

A student in the track is required to complete five courses, one in each of the four topics listed below, as well as one more chosen from any one of the areas. No individual course number may be counted for more than one track requirement (even if, as in the case of POL 332 for example, the course may be taken by a student more than once as the topic changes annually).

  1. The Executive Branch: POL 325, POL 330, POL 331/HUM 305, POL 332 (when approved by the track adviser).
  2. The Legislative Branch: POL 324, POL 329.
  3. The Constitution and the Courts: POL 314, POL 315, POL 316, POL 318, POL 319/AMS 219/AAS 386, POL 320, POL 326, POL 339.
  4. American Political, Legal, and Constitutional Thought: SPI 370/POL 308/CHV 301, POL 314, POL 315, POL 316, POL 319/AMS 219/AAS 386, POL 321, POL 331/HUM 305, POL 332 (when approved by the track adviser), POL 488/HUM 488/AMS 488, POL 493, POL 494.
Senior Thesis

While a student in the track must write a thesis on a topic related to the student's primary field, the thesis must also incorporate significant content related to themes in one or more of the topic areas of the track. The student should meet with the AIIP adviser during the fall semester of senior year to confirm the suitability of their thesis topic. On or before the thesis draft deadline, the appropriate content of the thesis must be certified by the AIIP adviser.

Track in Political Economy

The Department of Politics offers the track in political economy (PE) for students who wish to further their understanding of social phenomena and individual behavior by combining the perspectives of its two constituent disciplines. The track allows and encourages students to use analytical tools from game theory, microeconomics and statistics to study political behavior, and to incorporate a thorough analysis of politics and collective decision-making into economic analysis.

Prerequisites

To participate in this track, students must complete two politics courses and ECO 100 and ECO 101, and MAT 103 (or higher level) before the end of their sophomore year. All five of these courses should be taken on a graded basis (i.e., not pass/D/fail). (Under special circumstances, students can apply for exceptions or deferrals of these prerequisites. These requests will be considered by the PE adviser.)

Requirements

It is important for each student to select a combination of economics and politics courses that form a coherent and meaningful track. Before signing up for the first term of junior year, the student should work out a tentative course outline for the next two years; this outline must be approved by the PE adviser.

In addition to the PE prerequisites, a student in the PE track is required to complete the following courses, all of which will be counted as departmentals:

  1. Political Economy: either Political Economy (POL 349), Comparative Political Economy for Policy Making (SPI 329/POL 350),* or Comparative Political Economy (POL 352)*. (*NOTE: Students may take either SPI 329/POL 350 or POL 352 — not both.)
  2. Game Theory in Politics: Game Theory in Politics (POL 347/ECO 347).
  3. Quantitative Methods: POL 345/SOC 305/SPI 211, POL 346, ECO 202, ECO 302, or ECO 312.
  4. Microeconomics: One of the following intermediate microeconomics courses: ECO 300, ECO 310, or SPI 300.
  5. Macroeconomics/Topics: One of the following courses: Intermediate Macroeconomics (ECO 301, ECO 311), International Trade (SPI 301/ECO 352), International Development (SPI 302/ECO 359), Public Economics (SPI 307/ECO 349).

Together with five additional courses in the politics department (possibly including POL courses counted as prerequisites), this 10-course combination fulfills the requirements both for the PE track and for the major, and is used in calculating departmental honors.

Students in the PE track must also fulfill the 3-2-1 field distribution requirement of the department, however, the quantitative methods course will satisfy the politics department's analytical requirement, while POL 347/ECO 347 can serve as a course in a third field.

Senior Thesis

While a student in the track must write a thesis on a topic related to the student's primary field, the thesis must also incorporate significant PE content. On or before the thesis draft deadline, the PE content of the thesis must be certified by the PE adviser. The student should meet with the PE adviser well in advance of this deadline to discuss the PE content of the thesis.

Track in Quantitative and Analytical Political Science

The track in quantitative and analytical political science (QAPS) is designed for students who wish to deepen their understanding of quantitative and analytical methods to study key questions in political science.

Prerequisite
  • MAT 175 (or its equivalent EGR 192, MAT 201, MAT 203)
Requirements

In addition to the prerequisite, students must complete four courses among those listed below along with six other departmental courses. Of the following six courses, students must take four with at least one being in quantitative analysis as well as at least one from the game theory and applications category.

  • Quantitative Analysis: SOC 245/POL 245, 345, 346
  • Game Theory and Applications: POL 250, 347, 349, SPI 329/POL 350*, 352*. (*NOTE: Students may take either SPI 329/POL 350 or POL 352 — not both.)
Senior Thesis 

While a student in the track must write a thesis on a topic related to the student's primary field, the thesis must also incorporate quantitative and/or analytics methods at a level similar or superior to the material covered in the track requirements. The student should meet with the QAPS adviser during the fall semester of senior year to confirm the suitability of their thesis research design. On or before the thesis draft deadline, the appropriate content of the thesis must be certified by the QAPS adviser.

Track in Race and Identity

The Department of Politics offers the track in race and identity (RI) for politics majors seeking a deeper understanding of the politics of race and identity. Completion of the track attests to a student having successfully taken a range of courses examining the role of race and identity in politics. The track offers courses dealing with moral, ethical and legal issues relating to race and identity in the United States and around the world, such as hate speech, discrimination and civil rights. The track also encompasses courses in international relations and comparative politics focusing on human rights, ethnic conflict and social movements.

This track is suitable for students interested in all politics subfields, including political theory, American politics, comparative politics, international relations, political economy and methods. Currently, the widest array of courses in the track is available in the subfield of American politics. As with other department tracks, students enrolled in the RI track must still fulfill other requirements for politics majors, including the 3-2-1 distribution requirement (a primary field, a secondary field and a tertiary field). A single course can simultaneously satisfy a distribution requirement and count toward the track.

Requirements

The track in race and identity has the following course requirements:

  1. Core Course. All students in the track must take POL 344/AAS 344/AMS 244 (Race and Politics in the United States).
  2. Other Courses. Students must complete three other courses dealing with themes of race and identity, in addition to the core course and the six other departmental courses required for the politics major. A menu of courses that can be taken toward completion of the RI track is provided below. (New departmental courses that meet the requirements for this track will be added to the track, as applicable.)
  • POL 316 Civil Liberties
  • POL 319/AMS 219/AAS 386 Antidiscrimination Law
  • POL 339 The Politics of Crime and Punishment
  • SPI 331/SOC 312/AFS 317POL 343 Race and Public Policy
  • POL 356 Comparative Ethnic Conflict
  • POL 357/SPI 314/GSS 399/SAS 357 Gender and Development
  • POL 360 Social Movements and Revolutions
  • POL 380 Human Rights
  • POL 386 Violent Politics
  • POL 405/CHV 406 The Ethics of Borders and Migration
  • POL 417/CHV 417 Colonialism and Historic Injustice
  • POL 422/GSS 422 Gender and American Politics
  • SPI 337/POL 424 Black Politics and Public Policy in the U.S.
  • POL 477/CHV 477/JRN 477 Expressive Rights and Wrongs: Speech, Offense, and Commemoration

NOTE: The department will consider requests for other courses to apply toward the track on a case-by-case basis with a caveat that students may seek approval for only one nonpolitics course to count as satisfying a requirement for the track. To seek such approval, students must complete the cognate approval application and send a current syllabus to the cognate approval adviser along with the RI track adviser for review, no later than the last day of classes within the semester that the course is offered during junior and senior years. The only exception is during the spring semester of senior year, when the cognate application deadline is the second Friday of classes.

Senior Thesis

Students in the track must write a senior thesis that incorporates themes relating to race and identity. Students should meet with the RI track adviser during the fall semester of their senior year to confirm the suitability of their thesis topic for the track. On or before the thesis draft deadline, the suitability of the thesis must be certified by the RI track adviser.

Independent Work

Junior Year

The junior independent work (JIW) requirement in politics provides majors with an opportunity to delve into their research interests and conduct a thorough examination. The goal is for students to produce a well-reasoned and analytical essay that scrutinizes a political issue using approaches from political science. Over the course of two semesters, students will undertake two research projects. In the fall, students will be required to submit a research prospectus, while in the spring, they will write a full-length junior paper (JP). The required POL 300 will instruct students in research design and the preparation of their research prospectus. The faculty instructors for the practicum component of POL 300 will serve as fall JIW advisers. The spring JP can either build on the prospectus or explore a new topic. Each semester serves a specific purpose; the fall focuses on teaching students how to plan a research project and refine a question, while the spring is focused on executing the project and exposition. Additional information on topics such as adviser assignment and final deadlines is available in the junior independent work and senior thesis sections of the department's website.

Students will receive one POL 981 grade (worth 2.0) at the end of the spring term that is a weighted average of fall (30%) and spring (70%) JIW grades.  Students must achieve a grade of C or better in POL 981. If a student receives a grade below C in POL 981, another JP is required with a grade that brings the average of this additional paper and the POL 981 grade to at least a grade of C. This is a prerequisite for beginning the senior year. For purposes of this requirement, the grades before the application of any late penalties are used.

Senior Year

During the senior year, each student writes a thesis, an essay of generally about 100 double-spaced pages and rarely fewer than 80 pages. The senior thesis normally is written on a topic within a student's primary field. The senior thesis is expected to make an original (or otherwise distinctive) contribution to broader knowledge in the field in which the student is working, and it is important that the thesis be situated explicitly in relation to existing published literature. The department encourages students to use the summer between junior and senior year for work on the senior thesis. 

The senior thesis may expand upon ideas that were explored in a student's JP. A student may draw on and cite their own JP just as they would use other resources. In addition, a student may re-use a limited portion of their JP in the senior thesis; for instance, the literature review could be re-used across the two. Whenever material from the JP is re-used, a student must add a footnote noting the duplication across the JP or senior thesis. Note: This policy does not affect the standard University guidelines for attributing ideas and research findings, whenever appropriate. The same policy holds with respect to incorporating the fall junior research prospectus into either the spring JP or senior thesis.

Senior Departmental Examination

Seniors are required to prepare and present a professional poster describing their senior thesis research as the senior comprehensive exam.

Study Abroad

Under normal circumstances, the department encourages students to consider studying abroad during the spring semester of junior year. If a program is approved in advance by the Office of International Programs (OIP), the department will credit as departmentals as many as two courses in political science (or related fields) when they are taken at an overseas university. Normally, the department is willing to substitute no more than one cognate and one departmental or two cognates for majors studying abroad for one semester. In the spring term, students who study abroad will write a JP under the supervision of a politics faculty member who will advise them remotely.

NOTE: Students may not study abroad during the fall semester of junior year as they need to be on campus to take POL 300, as part of completing the Fall JIW requirement — beginning with the Class of 2025.

Students may study abroad in the fall semester of senior year provided that they have the preapproval of both OIP and the study abroad adviser. The department will allow up to four study abroad politics courses to count only in the event a student wants to study abroad in the spring of junior year and then again in the fall of senior year — two for each semester abroad. 

Prospective majors who wish to study abroad during sophomore year who intend to declare politics as a major should receive preapproval for departmental course credit from the study abroad adviser. The department will accept up to two politics-related study abroad courses from sophomore year which can be applied toward the major, one of which can count as a politics prerequisite. (This rule suggests that one of the prerequisites must be a politics course that was taken at Princeton no later than the end of sophomore year.)

Faculty

  • Chair

    • Alan W. Patten
  • Associate Chair

    • Kristopher W. Ramsay
  • Director of Undergraduate Studies

    • Matias Iaryczower
  • Director of Graduate Studies

    • Mark R. Beissinger
  • Professor

    • Gary J. Bass
    • Mark R. Beissinger
    • Charles R. Beitz
    • Carles Boix
    • Charles M. Cameron
    • Rafaela M. Dancygier
    • Aaron L. Friedberg
    • Paul Frymer
    • Robert P. George
    • Matias Iaryczower
    • G. John Ikenberry
    • John Kastellec
    • Atul Kohli
    • Melissa Lane
    • Frances E. Lee
    • John B. Londregan
    • Stephen J. Macedo
    • Nolan McCarty
    • Tali Mendelberg
    • Helen V. Milner
    • Andrew Moravcsik
    • Layna Mosley
    • Jan-Werner Müller
    • Alan W. Patten
    • Grigore Pop-Eleches
    • Markus Prior
    • Kristopher W. Ramsay
    • Jacob N. Shapiro
    • Arthur Spirling
    • Anna B. Stilz
    • Rocío Titiunik
    • James Raymond Vreeland
    • Leonard Wantchekon
    • Ismail K. White
    • Keith E. Whittington
    • Jennifer A. Widner
    • Deborah J. Yashar
  • Associate Professor

    • Jonathan F. Mummolo
    • LaFleur Stephens-Dougan
    • Rory Truex
    • Hye Young You
  • Assistant Professor

    • Christopher W. Blair
    • Gregory A. Conti
    • German S. Gieczewski
    • Tanushree Goyal
    • Naima N. Green-Riley
    • Andy Guess
    • Saad A. Gulzar
    • Gleason Judd
    • Patricia A. Kirkland
    • Melissa Megan Lee
    • Elizabeth R. Nugent
    • Rebecca L. Perlman
    • Guadalupe Tuñón
    • Andreas B. Wiedemann
    • Xu Xu
  • Associated Faculty

    • Christopher L. Eisgruber, President
    • Daniel Garber, Philosophy
    • Elizabeth L. Paluck, Psychology
    • Philip N. Pettit, Center for Human Values
    • Kim Lane Scheppele, Schl of Public & Int'l Affairs
    • Michael Smith, Philosophy
    • Brandon M. Stewart, Sociology
  • Lecturer with Rank of Professor

    • Allen Carl Guelzo
  • Lecturer

    • Shilo Brooks
    • Tolgahan Dilgin
    • David R. Hill
    • Thomas D. Howes
    • Marzenna James
    • Corrine M. McConnaughy
    • Zeyang Yu
  • Visiting Lecturer

    • Mark O'Brien
    • R.J. Snell
    • Gregory Sullivan

For a full list of faculty members and fellows please visit the department or program website.

Courses

POL 210 - Political Theory Fall EM

An introduction to political theory that explores the relevance of theory to a critical understanding of political and social problems. The course will examine the major classical and contemporary expressions of liberal, conservative, and socialist theory and relate them to the problems of order, freedom, equality, and justice. Two lectures, one preceptorial. A. Stilz

POL 220 - American Politics (also SPI 310) Fall SA

An introduction to the national institutions and political processes of American government. Topics include the Constitution, the American political tradition, public opinion, interest groups, political institutions, civil rights, civil liberties, and public policy. Two lectures, one preceptorial. P. Frymer

POL 230 - Introduction to Comparative Politics (also SPI 325) Fall SA

This course will focus on the process of democratic transition and consolidation in a comparative and historical manner. In particular, we will analyze the democratic revolution that has swept the globe during the last 30 years by examining the communist and authoritarian backgrounds of newly democratized countries, the factors influencing the emergence of democracy, the problems associated with building stable democratic systems, and finally, the prospects for a regime shift in parts of the world still under autocratic rule. Two lectures, one preceptorial. A. Wiedemann

POL 240 - International Relations (also SPI 312) Spring SA

A comprehensive introduction to the major issues of contemporary international relations. The course presents competing theoretical perspectives and reviews the historical record to explore such puzzles as the causes of war, explanations of cooperation, the behavior of states, and the proper ethical standards for judging international relations. Two lectures, one preceptorial. C. Blair

POL 250 - Introduction to Game Theory Not offered this year SA

This course serves as an introduction to strategic issues in politics as well as non-cooperative game theory. The course develops the basic concepts and equilibrium concepts of normal and extensive form games with both complete and incomplete information. We will look at collective action problems, bargaining, voting, legislative politics, deliberation, deterrence and campaigns. Evaluation is through problem sets, exams and a short paper in which students develop their own model and analysis. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 301 - Political Theory, Athens to Augustine (also CLA 301/HLS 303/PHI 353) Fall EM

A study of the fundamental questions of political theory as framed in context of the institutions and writings of ancient Greek and Roman thinkers from the classical period into late antiquity and the spread of Christianity in Rome. We will canvass the meaning of justice in Plato's "Republic", the definition of the citizen in Aristotle's "Politics", to Cicero's reflections on the purpose of a commonwealth, and Augustine's challenge to those reflections and to the primacy of political life at all in light of divine purposes. Through classic texts, we explore basic questions of constitutional ethics and politics. Two lectures, one preceptorial. M. Lane

POL 302 - Continental Political Thought Not offered this year EM

An examination of the development of political thought in Europe from the second half of the 18th century to the end of the 19th. The course will focus on Kantian, Hegelian, and Marxist developments in this tradition. Emphasis on the important role played by different conceptions of freedom, human nature, and history in the political thought of the period, with particular attention to issues concerning autonomy and authority, the nature of the state, and the limits to state power. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 303 - Modern Political Theory Spring EM

A study of the writings of some major political theorists from the 17th through the 19th centuries, including Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, and J. S. Mill. Two lectures, one preceptorial. G. Conti

POL 304 - Conservative Political Thought Not offered this year EM

A historical and analytic examination of conservative political theories. Topics include the classical and medieval roots of modern conservatism, the development of conservatism in Europe and America, fascism and the radical right, and the tensions between libertarianism and traditionalism in contemporary conservative thought. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 305 - Radical Political Thought Spring EM

This course will examine traditions of political thought--mostly, but not only, on the Left--which challenge mainstream conceptions of liberal democracy and modern capitalist society. The main focus will be on Marxism, anarchism, feminism, religious radicalism, ecological thought, and critiques of alienation in everyday life. Particular attention is paid to the relationship between political and cultural criticism, and to the philosophical anthropologies underlying different theories as well as the mechanisms for social change they envisage. We also ask if liberal democratic thought can effectively respond to radical challenges. J. Müller

POL 306 - Democratic Theory (also CHV 306/PHI 360) Not offered this year EM

A study of the intellectual foundations of the modern democratic state. Topics include the meaning and justification of democracy, the rationality of voting, political representation, property rights, civil disobedience, and education. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 307 - The Just Society (also CHV 307) Not offered this year EM

An introduction to alternative theories of social justice and examination of the implications of those theories in areas of contemporary social and political controversy. Readings and lectures focus on utilitarian, libertarian, liberal egalitarian, communitarian, and feminist conceptions of what it means to live in a just society. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 308 - Ethics and Public Policy (also CHV 301/SPI 370) Fall EM

POL 309 - Politics and Religion (also REL 309) Not offered this year EM

Close study of a number of texts that have illuminated the connection between religiosity and politics, and, in particular, the role of religious language and ideas to establish, preserve, reform, and redeem republics. Special attention will be given to the religious dimensions of revolutionary and messianic politics, and to the role that religiosity has played in the development of contemporary social movements and in the moral and political resistance to totalitarian regimes. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 313 - Global Justice (also CHV 313) Not offered this year EM

What, if any, norms of justice apply to the institutions and practice of world politics? Topics include "political realism" and skepticism about global morality; just wars and justice in warfare; ethics of humanitarian intervention; the nature and basis of human rights; world poverty and global distributive justice; and democracy and accountability in global institutions. Readings chosen from recent works in political philosophy. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 314 - American Constitutional Development Not offered this year SA

The development of American constitutionalism, considered historically as the product of legal, political, and intellectual currents and crises (e.g., the Founding, the Marshall and Taney eras, the slavery crises, the rise of corporate capitalism, the emergence of the modern state, the New Deal crisis, and new forms of rights and liberties). Topics include the growth of Supreme Court power, the court's relation to the states and the other federal branches, and the influence on constitutional understandings of economic developments, reform movements, wars, party competition, and legal and political thought. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 315 - Constitutional Interpretation Fall SA

A study of the development of the United States Constitution, chiefly through close analysis of selected judicial decisions. One 90-minute lecture, one two-hour preceptorial. R. George

POL 316 - Civil Liberties Spring CDEM

A study of selected problems concerning civil liberties in contemporary America, with specific focus on privacy and on problems derived from living in a pluralistic society. One 90-minute lecture, one 90-minute class. R. George

POL 318 - Law and Society Spring SA

An exploration of the relationships between law and society, using judicial and other materials from the American legal system. Topics considered include the stages of legal development, law and morality, judicial decision making, formal resolution of disputes, social control through law, the political nature of law, and courts. Two lectures, one preceptorial. S. Staszak

POL 320 - Judicial Politics Spring SA

An introduction to the political science of law and courts. Topics typically include: bargaining and decision making on the U.S. Supreme Court; political struggles over doctrine within the judicial hierarchy; the politics of Supreme Court nominations; juries as political institutions; court packing, jurisdiction stripping, and judicial intimidation; political use of litigation by activists, firms, and interest groups; judicial oversight of the administrative state; judicial activism by state attorneys general; and the social and economic impact of courts. Two lectures, one preceptorial. J. Kastellec

POL 321 - American Political Thought Spring CDEM

The origin and development of political ideas and institutions. Drawn from primary sources, the readings feature the ideas and deeds of those who from colonial times to the present have shaped the American concept of free government. Two lectures, one preceptorial. K. Whittington

POL 322 - Public Opinion Not offered this year SA

An examination of public opinion and mass political behavior, particularly in the American context. Topics include formation of political attitudes and ideology, conflict and consensus on basic issues, political participation and voting, the effects of the media, and the impact of public opinion on governmental policy. Two lectures, one preceptorial or laboratory. Staff

POL 323 - Party Politics Not offered this year SA

An examination of party organization and activities, the forces that shape them, and their consequences. The course is concerned primarily with U.S. party politics in the contemporary period but gives some attention to American political history and foreign party systems. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 324 - Congressional Politics Spring SA

An examination of the role of Congress in American politics, with a special focus on the political world of individual legislators. The course explores how legislators run their campaigns, interact with their constituents, operate within Congress, and make public policy. Two lectures, one preceptorial. F. Lee

POL 325 - The Presidency and Executive Power Not offered this year SA

A study of the place of the presidency in the American political order that stresses tension between power and accountability inherent in the office and the system. Topics include: separation of powers, presidential selection, impeachment, relations with Congress and bureaucracy, emergency powers, presidential character, and leadership. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 327 - Mass Media, Social Media, and American Politics (also JRN 327) Spring SA

This course considers the role of the mass media in American politics and the influence of the media on Americans' political attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors. We will examine the nature of news and news making organizations, the role of the news media in electoral campaigns, how the media shape the behavior of politicians once in office, political advertising, and the impact of the media on Americans' political attitudes. A. Guess

POL 329 - Policy Making in America Not offered this year SA

This course provides a realistic introduction to how public policy is made in the United States today. It examines how people (voters, activists, wealthy individuals, lobbyists, politicians, bureaucrats, and judges), organizations (interest groups, firms, unions, foundations, think tanks, political parties, and the media) and political institutions (Congress, the presidency, the bureaucracy, and the judiciary) come together to create and implement public policy. The course combines social science theory and systematic empirical evidence with case studies, and provides students with tools of proven usefulness for practical political analysis. Staff

POL 330 - Electing the President: Voter Psychology and Candidate Strategy Not offered this year SA

An examination of how U.S. election campaigns are conducted and how they affect political reasoning and voting behavior. Empirical analyses of public opinion data and campaign communication provide the foundation for studying campaigns. The goal of the course is to offer a broad theoretical understanding of the conduct of campaigns and their effects. Recent elections serve to illustrate key insights. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 332 - Topics in American Statesmanship Spring EMLA

What is statesmanship? Can qualities of statesmanship be critically assessed? If so, by what analytical methods of political science? This course explores statesmanship through a study of the biographies, principles, practices, and leadership styles of men and women who have been widely regarded as having exemplified the craft. Among the goals is to deepen understanding of how the practical necessities of democratic politics have been combined with appeals to democracy's loftiest ideals. S. Brooks

POL 333 - Latino Politics in the U.S. (also LAO 333/LAS 333/SOC 325) Not offered this year SA

The course will explore the personal, political, historical and sacred aspects of Latinas/Latinos in the United States from the perspective of a theory of transformation. The course intends to provide Latinas/Latinos as well as students from all backgrounds the opportunity to see a people in their own midst becoming and being political as they move forward to create a new culture and community in this country. Staff

POL 343 - Race and Public Policy (also AAS 317/SOC 312/SPI 331) Not offered this year SA

POL 344 - Race and Politics in the United States (also AAS 344/AMS 244) Fall CDSA

This course focuses upon the evolution, nature, and role of black politics within the American Political System, in the post- civil rights era. The concern is with black people as actors and creators and initiators in the political process. Specifically, this course will examine various political controversies that surround the role of race in American society. These controversies or issues, affect public opinion, political institutions, political behavior, and salient public policy debates. Thus this course will assess and evaluate the contemporary influence of race in each of these domains while also exploring their historical antecedents. I. White

POL 345 - Introduction to Quantitative Social Science (also SOC 305/SPI 211) Fall QCR

Would universal health insurance improve the health of the poor? Do patterns of arrests in US cities show evidence of racial profiling? What accounts for who votes and their choice of candidates? This course will teach students how to address these and other social science questions by analyzing quantitative data. The course introduces basic principles of statistical inference and programming skills for data analysis. The goal is to provide students with the foundation necessary to analyze data in their own research and to become critical consumers of statistical claims made in the news media, in policy reports, and in academic research. Z. Yu

POL 346 - Applied Quantitative Analysis Spring QCR

Develops the use of statistical techniques appropriate for empirical exploration of political topics. Each statistical topic is motivated by a significant question in political science that can be addressed by an available data set. Computers will be used both as part of the lecture and for completing classwork. Emphasis is on hands-on training that will give students the capacity to use these statistical techniques in other courses and independent work. Prerequisites: 345 or instructor's permission. Two lectures, one preceptorial. J. Londregan

POL 347 - Game Theory in Politics (also ECO 347) Spring QCR

An introduction to the use of mathematical models and, especially, game theory in the study of politics. The basics of game theory are presented through applications to a broad range of political phenomena: voting, legislative politics, political campaigns, comparison of electoral systems, the evolution of cooperation, and international relations. Two lectures, one preceptorial. M. Iaryczower

POL 349 - Political Economy Fall SA

This course provides a rigorous introduction to some of the central ideas in political economy. Game theoretic models of voting are used to illustrate the way that democratic institutions filter interests. Topics may include the measurement of income inequality, the median voter theorem, models of income redistribution, political agency, and the link between institutions and economic performance. Two lectures, one preceptorial. G. Gieczewski

POL 351 - The Politics of Development (also LAS 371/SPI 311) Spring SA

A comparative study of politics in selected developing countries of Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Topics include colonialism, nationalism, class and ethic conflict, political instability, military coups, revolutionary change, and development strategies such as land reforms, green revolution, import substitution, and management of external dependencies. Two lectures, one preceptorial. A. Kohli

POL 352 - Comparative Political Economy Not offered this year SA

Explores the dynamic relationship in theory between market-formation and reform on the one hand, and economic ideas and cultural values on the other. The course examines classical and contemporary works in comparative political economy. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 353 - The Politics of Modern Islam (also NES 269) Not offered this year HA

POL 355 - Comparative Politics of Legislatures Not offered this year SA

This course examines the workings of legislatures in a comparative setting.The course will look at the internal workings of legislative institutions, and at the relationship between electoral systems and legislative outcomes. We will consider and compare parliamentary and presidential systems, unicameral and bicameral legislatures. The course will look at the determinants of cabinet duration in parliamentary systems, and the emergence of committee systems. We will also take up the linkage between electoral systems and the structure of political parties, and the reasons for political parties to emerge from within and outside the legislature. Staff

POL 356 - Comparative Ethnic Conflict Not offered this year SA

This course introduces students to the study of ethnic conflict. It will examine different theories of ethnically based identification and mobilization; cover different types of ethnic conflict such as riots, genocide, hate crime and war; and study past and present cases of ethnic conflict around the world. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 360 - Social Movements and Revolutions Fall SA

This course investigates the politics of protest and revolution, examining the conditions under which protest movements emerge, their choice of protest tactics, the effects of repression and concessions, and the determinants of movement success. The second part of the courses focuses on revolutions, examining the forms that they assume and the conditions under which they develop and prove successful. Examples discussed include the civil rights, women's and environmental movements; the French, Russian, and Iranian revolutions; the collapse of communism; and the "colored" revolutions and other waves of revolution in the contemporary world. M. Beissinger

POL 362 - Chinese Politics (also EAS 362/SPI 323) Not offered this year SA

Traditional politics; the rise of warlords, nationalists, and radicals; causes of the "Liberation," land reform, Hundred Flowers, Great Leap Forward, Cultural Revolution, and Four Modernizations; policies of Mao and Deng for development, health, law, and rights. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 364 - Politics of the Middle East (also NES 322) Fall SA

Focuses on social and economic change in the Middle East as reflected in development strategies, political competition and conflict, and state intervention in economic and social life. The emphasis is on domestic and comparative politics in the Middle East rather than its international relations. Two lectures, one preceptorial. E. Nugent

POL 366 - Politics in Africa (also AFS 366) Not offered this year CDSA

A comparative approach to African political systems. The meanings of the concepts of modernization, national integration, and development are explored. Topics include the inheritances of colonial rule, independence and the new tasks, political patterns in the postindependence period, prospects for political change, and African interstate relations. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 367 - Latin American Politics (also LAS 367/SPI 367) Not offered this year SA

A study of the governments and politics of Latin America. The political systems of the Latin American countries will be examined, as well as the common political problems and processes of the area. Special attention will be given to the role of revolution, military rule, and constitutional democracy in Latin American political development. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 368 - Modern Iran (also NES 365) HA

POL 374 - Russian and Post-Soviet Politics Not offered this year SA

This course surveys the politics of Russia and the post-Soviet states, focusing on the four major political challenges that these states confront: state-building, nation-building, democratization, and economic development. Particular attention is given to the ways in which the Soviet experience continues to shape the politics of the Eurasian region, nation-building and identity politics, modes of authoritarian rule and democratization, the politics of energy, and the role of external actors and Russian policies in affecting the political evolution of the region. Staff

POL 375 - Politics after Communism Not offered this year SA

An examination of the political and economic change in Russia and some of the former Soviet republics from Gorbachev to the present. After briefly reviewing the main institutions of the Soviet system and theories of its collapse, the course examines specific reforms and the social impact of rapid systemic change. Topics include shock therapy (privatization and economic liberalization), nationalism, crime, and legislative reform among others. The course will also compare the process of change in the former Soviet Union with democratic and market transitions in Latin America and elsewhere. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 378 - Politics in India Not offered this year SA

An introduction to politics in the large subcontinental country of India. The course will address themes that are important both to India and to a general study of politics in a developing country. The following questions help organize the course: How does one make sense of democracy in a poor, multiethnic setting? How has democratic politics shaped and been shaped by a society divided along numerous lines, such as caste, class, and linguistic and religious identities? And how well has the democratic state fared in promoting both economic growth and social welfare? Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 380 - Human Rights (also SPI 319) Spring SA

A study of the politics and history of human rights. What are human rights? How can dictatorships be resisted from the inside and the outside? Can we prevent genocide? Is it morally acceptable and politically wise to launch humanitarian military interventions to prevent the slaughter of foreign civilians? What are the laws of war, and how can we punish the war criminals who violate them? Cases include the Ottoman Empire, Nazi Germany, the Soviet Union, Bosnia, and Rwanda. Two lectures, one preceptorial. G. Bass

POL 381 - Theories of International Relations Not offered this year SA

Examination of selected theories and issues of international relations including the following: causes of war, theories of imperialism, the issue of order and change, the relationship of morality and statecraft. Course readings drawn from historical and theoretical materials. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Staff

POL 385 - International Political Economy Fall SA

A study of the relationship between political and economic processes in international affairs. Attention will be given to problems that lie on the boundary between politics and economics. Two lectures, one preceptorial. L. Mosley

POL 386 - Violent Politics Fall SA

Governments have tremendous power over our lives and thus the competition over who controls them is always intense and often violent. This course will study various ways in which violence is used to political ends. The larger goal of the course is to understand the sources of violence in political competition and the conditions under which political disputes can be peacefully resolved. Specific forms of violence to be covered include assassination, civil war, ethnic conflict, insurgency, revolution, riots, terrorism, and war. J. Shapiro

POL 388 - Causes of War (also SPI 388) Fall SA

Why do states and peoples go to war? Conversely, how can war be avoided? This course surveys some of the most important explanations--including human nature, the anarchic international system, domestic politics, economics, technology, nationalism, and terrorism--and evaluates them in light of historical wars, and of crises resolved short of war. The course will examine cases ranging from the Peloponnesian War to the ongoing American-led war against terrorism. Two lectures, one preceptorial. G. Bass

POL 392 - American Foreign Policy Fall SA

A systematic study of major issues and problems of American foreign policy in the contemporary world. Two lectures, one preceptorial. C. Blair

POL 393 - Grand Strategy (also SPI 315) Not offered this year SA

POL 403 - Architecture and Democracy (also ARC 405/CHV 403/ECS 402) Spring EM

What kind of public architecture is appropiate for a democracy? Should public spaces and buildings reflect democratic values - such as transparency and accessibility - or is the crucial requirement for democratic architecture that the process of arriving at decisions about the built environment is as particpatory as possible? The course will introduce students to different theories of democracy, to different approaches to architecture, and to many examples of government architecture from around the world (the U.S., Germany, and China in particular), via images and films. Might include one or two field trips. J. Müller

POL 410 - Seminar in Political Theory (also CHV 410) Not offered this year EM

Investigation of a major theme in political theory. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. Staff

POL 411 - Seminar in Political Theory Not offered this year SA

Investigation of a major theme in political theory. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. Staff

POL 412 - Seminar in Political Theory (also HUM 411) Not offered this year EM

Investigation of a major theme in political theory. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. Staff

POL 413 - Seminar in Political Theory Not offered this year SA

Investigation of a major theme in political theory. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. Staff

POL 416 - Moral Conflicts in Public and Private Life (also CHV 416) Not offered this year EM

The distinction between public and private spheres of life is both foundational to modern liberal democratic politics and also fraught with controversy. This course examines such conflicts in the context of political theory, ethics, law, and public policy. Including the tense interface between public values and religious conscience and practice, and the scope of freedom with respect to marriage, family, and sexual relations. How broad are the claims of private liberty and what is the nature and extent of legitimate public authority when it comes to activities claimed to be private? Can paternalist and perfectionist policies ever be justified? Staff

POL 420 - Seminar in American Politics Not offered this year SA

Investigation of a major theme in American politics. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. Staff

POL 421 - Seminar in American Politics Not offered this year SA

Investigation of a major theme in American politics. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. Staff

POL 422 - Gender and American Politics (also GSS 422) Spring CDSA

This course considers how gender enters and shapes politics, primarily in the US context. It addresses a range of questions that center elections: How did women gain the right to vote? Are women voters really different than men voters? Are women politicians really any different than men politicians? Has women's involvement in electoral and institutional politics changed anything? It also considers how the gendered space of the American electoral system has limited its effectiveness in delivering outcomes desired by some groups of women, what their alternatives might be, and how those alternatives have been and continue to be pursued. C. McConnaughy

POL 423 - Seminar in American Politics Fall SA

Investigation of a major theme in American politics. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. K. Whittington

POL 430 - Seminar in Comparative Politics (also SPI 424) Fall SA

Investigation of a major theme in comparative politics. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. N. Lotito

POL 431 - Seminar in Comparative Politics (also LAS 390/SPI 425) Spring SA

Investigation of a major theme in comparative politics. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. G. Tuñón

POL 432 - Seminar in Comparative Politics (also SPI 426) Spring SA

Investigation of a major theme in comparative politics. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. S. van Noort

POL 433 - Seminar in Comparative Politics Not offered this year SA

Investigation of a major theme in comparative politics. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. Staff

POL 434 - Seminar in Comparative Politics Fall SA

Investigation of a major theme in comparative politics. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. X. Xu

POL 440 - Seminar in International Relations Not offered this year SA

Investigation of a major theme in international relations. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. Staff

POL 441 - Seminar in International Relations Not offered this year SA

Investigation of a major theme in international relations. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. Staff

POL 442 - Seminar in International Relations Spring SA

Investigation of a major theme in international relations. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. E. Kapstein

POL 443 - Seminar in International Relations Not offered this year SA

Investigation of a major theme in international relations. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. Staff

POL 450 - Seminar in Methods in Political Science Not offered this year QCR

Investigation of a major theme in methods of political science. Reading and intensive discussion of selected issues in the literature. One three-hour seminar. Staff

POL 465 - Political and Economic Development of the Middle East and North Africa (also AFS 465/NES 465) Fall SA

POL 479 - Comparative Constitutional Law (also CHV 470/SPI 421) Spring SA