Spanish and Portuguese

Program Offerings

Offering type
A.B.

More than half a billion people across five continents speak Spanish or Portuguese as their first language, and in the United States, with more than 38 million Spanish speakers, the Hispanic legacy is embedded in myriad aspects of American politics, arts and culture. Our community of scholars studies and highlights the importance and influence of the Spanish, Latin American and Luso-Afro-Brazilian histories, cultures and languages in the Americas, Europe, Africa and Asia, from the Middle Ages and the Renaissance to our globalized present.

Our department is a critical pillar of Princeton's commitment to internationalization and scholarly excellence. We encourage and facilitate interdisciplinary work, and our faculty are active in many other departments and programs on campus, including the Program in Latin American Studies, international and regional studies, Brazil LAB, American studies, global health, media and modernity, the School of Architecture, comparative literature, Renaissance studies, history, art and archaeology, the Art Museum and the Environmental Institute.

Our mission is to help Princeton students flourish as global citizens, ready to face the challenges posed by an increasingly cosmopolitan and multilingual professional world. With this general purpose in mind, we offer a full range of language courses, advanced seminars on literature and culture, translation workshops and the opportunity for independent study. With the support and guidance of our talented faculty, students can study not only the Spanish and Portuguese languages, but also literatures, visual arts, music, urban cultures, as well as the complex political and social histories of the Hispanic and Luso-Afro-Brazilian worlds.

Students become familiar with renowned writers such as Miguel de Cervantes and Jorge Luis Borges; Nobel Prize laureates Gabriela Mistral, José Saramago and Mario Vargas Llosa; influential artists such as the painters Diego Velázquez, Pablo Picasso and Frida Kahlo; the architect Oscar Niemeyer; contemporary musicians Caetano Veloso, Gotan Project and Calle 13; as well as international filmmakers such as Luis Buñuel, Pedro Almodóvar, Kleber Mendonça and Alfonso Cuarón. To experience cultural and linguistic immersion, our students also can study abroad through our popular summer programs in Argentina, Portugal and Spain, or with other approved international programs.

Our majors and certificate recipients are provided with the high linguistic proficiency, cross-cultural literacy and critical and analytical skills that are key for careers in the humanities, law, medicine, government, international relations, international business, education and community-based initiatives today. They also enable students interested in the environment to communicate effectively when doing research or volunteering in Spanish- or Portuguese-speaking regions. Our courses serve as passports for living and working in more than 30 countries, including some of the fastest growing economies in the world.

    Goals for Student Learning

    The mission of the Department of Spanish and Portuguese is to provide our majors with a refined knowledge of the literatures, cultures, societies and politics of the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking worlds. To address the range of areas in which this expertise can potentially be deployed, the department offers four different tracks: 1. Spanish Language, Literature and Culture or Portuguese Language, Literature and Culture; 2. POR and SPA Language, Literature and Culture; 3. Interdisciplinary, which combines the target language and culture with another field; and 4. Creative Arts.

    In response to the variety of interests and career goals of our students, we have expanded the range of course types and have opened perspectives for independent work. The diversity of the faculty’s approaches, as well as the preeminence of the multidisciplinary perspective represented by cultural studies, allow us to offer courses that include literary, cultural, visual and political analysis, translation theory and practice, studies on diversity and inequality, creative writing, etc. In recent years, our students have successfully defended senior theses of the most diverse nature: e.g., cultural and literary research, journalistic chronicles, ethnography, creative writing.

    The academic itinerary of Spanish and Portuguese majors attends the following learning goals:

    • To acquire a sophisticated knowledge of the contextual and historical specificities of the target culture(s) and their linguistic circulation, as well as to understand their positioning and involvement in global cultural and social networks.
    • To master the necessary methodological tools to critically analyze the studied topics. These include but are not limited to literary close reading, film studies and cultural analysis.
    • To acquire the research skills that are necessary to produce original and sophisticated pieces of work on the target topics. These include but are not limited to quantitative and qualitative analysis, development of archival research and conduction of ethnographic work.
    • To become familiar with the main currents in critical theory, especially those produced and circulating in the regions studied. Also, to be able to apply critical theory and other secondary sources in the development of independent research, whether it is aimed at creative work or at a scholarly essay.
    • To use their acquired knowledge and skills to actively intervene in a field of expertise, whether in education, cultural institutions, public policy or any other sector.

    Advanced Placement

    An advanced placement examination in Spanish (language and/or literature) with a score of 5 or SAT Subject Test score of at least 760 is required to satisfy the A.B. language requirement at entrance, or for admission to a 200-level course. A score of 7 on the higher-level IB test or a grade of A on the British A-level exam also fulfills the requirement.

    Prerequisites

    The normal requirement for admission to the department is successful completion of two 200-level courses in Spanish or one 200-level course in Portuguese.

    Declaration of Major

    Before or right after declaring a major in Spanish and/or Portuguese in April of sophomore year, please email the director of undergraduate studies to set up an appointment.

    Majors automatically default into the Track 1 subplan. (See track descriptions below.) There will be an opportunity to elect a subplan during the declaration period. However, it can be elected or changed at any time during junior or senior year by contacting the department's undergraduate administrator.

    Early Major

    Qualified students are encouraged to decide on their major as early as possible in their sophomore year. In this way they can benefit from departmental advising on course selection and on the possibility of spending a semester or the whole junior year abroad.

    Program of Study

    All Spanish majors are strongly advised to take one advanced language course (SPA 205, SPA 207, SPA 207S, SPA 208S, SPA 209, or SPA 307), unless the director of undergraduate studies (in consultation with the language directors) determines that the respective student’s language skills do not warrant taking such a course.

    All Portuguese majors are required to take at least one 200-level POR course.

    All Spanish majors must take one course in pre-1800 literature. University regulations limit to 12 the number of departmental courses allowed to each student in their major. Students cannot earn both a SPO major (in any track) and a SPO certificate (in any language). Students interested in focusing in both Spanish and Portuguese may choose Track 2 for their major.

    Departmental Tracks

    Departmental courses cover a wide array of literary, cultural, social, historical and political topics. Students are therefore able to pursue courses of study that are tailor-made to their own individual interests. The department offers four different tracks for majors.

    Please note that an upper division course is any course above Spanish 209 or POR 209.

    Track 1. One Language Spanish Language, Literature and Culture or Portuguese Language, Literature and Culture Track

    Major in one language, literature and culture (Spanish or Portuguese). Requires a minimum of eight upper-division courses in the language of the major. Up to two of those courses may be taken in English, in which case all written work must be completed in the target language.

    Track 2. Two Languages, Literature and Culture (POR and SPA) Track

    Major in two languages, literature and cultures (Spanish and Portuguese; or Spanish/Portuguese and another language). Requires a combination of five upper-division courses in Spanish or Portuguese and three upper-division courses in the second language. One of the five upper-division courses in Spanish or Portuguese may be taken in English, in which case all written work must be completed in the target language.

    Track 3Interdisciplinary Track

    Major in Spanish or Portuguese with another related field (e.g., urban studies, architecture, global health and health policy, environmental studies, humanistic studies, sociology, European studies, international studies, Latino studies, Latin American studies, comparative literature, history, politics, anthropology). Requires a combination of five upper-division courses in Spanish or Portuguese and three upper-division courses in the secondary field.  One of the five upper-division courses in Spanish or Portuguese may be taken in English, in which case all written work must be completed in the target language.

    Track 4. Creative Arts Track

    Major in Spanish or Portuguese with the creative arts (e.g., creative writing, theater, visual arts, translation). Requires a combination of five upper-division courses in Spanish or Portuguese and three upper-division courses in the creative arts. One of the five upper-division courses in Spanish or Portuguese may be taken in English, in which case all written work must be completed in the target language.

    Track Requirements

    Any track in the major in Spanish and/or Portuguese literature and cultures requires a minimum of eight upper-division courses, at least five of which must be in the language of the major. With the approval of the director of undergraduate studies, up to three courses taken during a semester abroad may count toward the major if the student is pursuing Track 1 or Track 2. Up to two courses taken during a semester abroad may be counted toward the major if the student is pursuing Track 3 or Track 4.

    How to Get Started: Language Requirement, Placement Test and Proficiency Evaluations

    Students who wish to continue a language begun in secondary school must have their proficiency measured either by a College Board score for admission (see Advanced Placement above) or by the department's placement test administered online during the summer before course registration. 

    Spanish Language Program

    The normal program for beginners seeking a basic mastery of Spanish is the sequence 101, 102, 107, which satisfies the University's language requirement.

    Students with a satisfactory score on the department's Spanish language placement test will be placed in either 103 or 105, and will proceed respectively to 107 or 108 to satisfy the University language requirement. They may also be placed directly into 108. Students who have successfully completed 107 may not take 108. Students cannot place into SPA 102 or SPA 107 through the department's placement test.

    Course credit in 101-102, 103, 107, or 108 is also available through approved courses outside of Princeton University (see Study Abroad below). Students who take 100-level Spanish courses outside of Princeton University must take the departmental placement test after the completion of their courses to demonstrate that they have reached the necessary proficiency level.

    Email Catalina Méndez Vallejo, associate director of the Spanish language program, for questions regarding the placement test.

    Students who want to receive credit for a Spanish language course taken outside of Princeton, or have questions concerning summer language study, should email Mariana Bono, associate director of the Spanish language program.

    Please contact Mariana Bono for the following:

    • Language assessment and proficiency evaluations (undergraduate and graduate students)
    • Pre-approval for 100- and 200-level Spanish language courses taken abroad. For upper-level Spanish literature and culture courses, please contact director of undergraduate studies Rafael Cesar.

    Contact Mariana Bono for questions regarding the Teacher Prep Program.

    Portuguese Language Program

    The sequence for beginners seeking a basic mastery of Portuguese is 101, 102, 107, which satisfies the University's language requirement. The sequence for students who have a previous knowledge of a Romance language is 106, 109, which also satisfies the University's language requirement. POR 106 is designed for, but not limited to, students who have already fulfilled the language requirement in Spanish, French or Italian. Students are encouraged to contact an instructor of Portuguese to find out whether they qualify to take 106. POR 199 is an intensive one-semester course and may not be used to fulfill the language requirement.  Placement is handled on a case-by-case basis. All questions related to 100- and 200-level Portuguese courses can be addressed to the director of the Portuguese Language Program, Nicola Cooney.

    The Portuguese faculty and instructors have created Lingua Viva, an online learning platform tailored to Princeton students, to support Portuguese courses. This website includes videos, music, news, literary works and more to maximize language acquisition, and promotes the diverse cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world. You are required to log into your Princeton University account in order to access the resources on the website.

    For questions concerning placement and summer study, please contact Nicola Cooney ([email protected]), director of the Portuguese language program.

    Independent Work

    The program of study in junior and senior years is generally more intensive in its focus, reflecting the requirements of the departmental major the student has chosen. Undergraduates declare their departmental major prior to the start of junior year and complete a program of study that combines a set of courses with junior and senior independent work. Independent work gives students the opportunity to work closely with faculty members on library, laboratory and field-based research, and in sustained writing projects. The independent work requirement, culminating in the senior thesis, is the keystone of the Princeton academic experience. In senior year, students take a departmental examination that is focused on some aspect of their major or on the senior thesis.

    Junior Papers

    Majors are strongly advised to take SPA/POR 330 during the fall of their junior year. This course is designed to introduce students to research methods and to guide them in the production of their first junior paper.

    Majors should discuss as soon as possible their area of interest with the director of undergraduate studies in order to find the most appropriate advisers for the junior papers (JPs). By the end of September (first JP), and by mid-February (second JP), all juniors should have contacted their advisers to discuss a plan of work.

    The first JP (fall semester) should be about 4,000 words, and the second JP (spring semester) should be between 5,000 and 8,000 words. Both JPs may be written in English, in which case a three-page summary in the target language must be provided. Or, the JP can be written in the target language, in which case a summary is not needed. Any extensions beyond the University deadline date need preapproval from both the director of undergraduate studies and the residential college dean. All JPs must include the University's honor pledge.

    Majors following two languages are encouraged to write one JP in each of the languages of the majors.

    Senior Thesis

    Majors should select a senior thesis adviser by the end of September at the latest. The senior thesis is normally written in English and should be between 15,000 and 20,000 words. Topics chosen in the past have ranged over the whole field of Spanish and Portuguese studies, from linguistic problems and literary techniques through close textual analysis to thematic and ideological studies. Students primarily interested in culture and civilization have written on art, political and economic issues, education and a variety of social questions. The senior thesis is a major commitment of a student's time and energy, and the most important yardstick for choosing a topic is willingness to spend many hours on a particular set of texts or problems. Please visit the Mudd Library website for inspiration and a listing of previous senior thesis topics over the years. More detailed information can be found in the Senior Thesis Handbook.

    Any extensions beyond the University deadline date need preapproval from both the director of undergraduate studies and the residential college dean.

    Resources are available to assist students with the costs of senior thesis research, including, when appropriate, travel abroad. The best time to use them is the summer preceding senior year.

    Senior Departmental Examination

    The senior departmental/comprehensive exam will consist of an oral presentation of the thesis. It will be followed by questions regarding the thesis content and bibliography, as well as questions related to the coursework done by the student in the department.

    Study Abroad

    The department strongly encourages its majors to spend as much time as they can in any country where their language(s) of concentration is (are) spoken. There are many ways of doing this within the four-year undergraduate degree: through study abroad for one or two semesters; through summer study abroad; and through a summer internship abroad. All students must visit the Office of International Programs, to become acquainted with the administrative procedures related to study abroad.

    Junior Semester / Junior Year Abroad

    Students planning to spend a semester or their whole junior year abroad should seek advice from the director of undergraduate studies and from relevant faculty in choosing a suitable program of study. Further assistance is available from the Office of International Programs. Departmental and University approvals of programs abroad are required.

    Grades awarded by overseas institutions for courses that are recognized in lieu of Princeton courses are not included in the consideration of departmental honors.

    Students who study abroad are not exempted from independent work requirements. If necessary, the department will decide to find a JP adviser in the location where the student spends the semester or year abroad or will indicate a department adviser who will be in contact with the student throughout the term or year abroad.

    Up to three approved courses taken abroad in one semester will normally count for up to three course credits toward the major. Students must complete the program abroad to the standards required by the overseas institution. For more information, please see Go Abroad and the International Travel Handbook which are available online or in the Office of International Programs.

    Summer Language Study

    All students interested in languages are encouraged to study abroad during the summer in one of the programs recommended by the department and the Office of International Programs. The Department of Spanish and Portuguese has summer programs in Toledo, Spain, and Buenos Aires, Argentina, for students with intermediate and advanced knowledge of Spanish, and a summer program in Lisbon, Portugal, for students with intermediate to advanced knowledge of Portuguese. The department offers several scholarships to attend those programs.

    Study Abroad Course Approval

    For courses not offered through or affiliated with Princeton University, Approval for a Course Taken at Another Institution forms must be approved by the department contacts noted below, depending on the course level. After meeting with the Office of International Programs, please email the appropriate faculty member for an appointment, and bring a form for approval along with the study abroad course description, syllabus or materials. Study abroad courses must be approved in advance.

    Rafael Cesar, director of Undergraduate Studies: Upper-level Spanish and Portuguese literature and culture courses

    Mariana Bono: Language-level Spanish courses

    Nicola Cooney: Language-level Portuguese courses

    For proficiency evaluations, please see our Language Learning section.

    International Internship Program

    Princeton's International Internship Program (IIP) supports Princeton undergraduates who wish to undertake a summer internship abroad.

    Certificate in Language and Culture

    Admission

    The program is open to all undergraduates in all departments. Ordinarily, students majoring in language and literature departments, including comparative literature, will be eligible for the certificate in language and culture provided that: (a) the linguistic base for the language and culture certificate is different from the linguistic base of the major; and (b) the work required for the language and culture certificate does not duplicate the requirements of the major. Students pursuing area studies certificates may earn the certificate in language and culture provided that: (a) the courses they elect to satisfy the requirements of the area studies program are different from those they elect to satisfy the requirements of the language and culture certificate program (in agreement with the Program in Latin American Studies, one course can be used toward both a certificate in Spanish or Portuguese and a certificate in Latin American Studies; and (b) they submit a piece of independent work in addition to the independent work that satisfies the requirements of the area studies program.

    Students wishing to complete a certificate in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Cultures must fill out the Certificate Application Form. A separate application needs to be completed for each language in which a certificate will be pursued. Please email the undergraduate administrator with general questions, and the director of undergraduate studies regarding preapproval for study abroad courses other than those offered by Princeton. Students may submit applications before their senior year, provided the course requirements have been completed.

    Plan of Study

    The certificate in language and culture is available in Spanish and Portuguese and involves satisfactory completion of the following course requirements:

    Spanish
    1. Four department-based or cross-listed SPA courses above SPA 209, at least three of which must be 300-level (or higher) in Spanish language, literature or culture. Courses must be taken for a letter grade, not pass/D/fail or audit. **NOTE: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, spring '20 and academic year '20–'21 courses taken PDF will be accepted.** At the discretion of the director of undergraduate studies, students who study abroad during the academic year may count one preapproved course per semester abroad toward the certificate. One Princeton summer abroad course offered through the department would also count. Two preapproved courses in a summer program abroad other than Princeton's can count for one course toward the certificate. In no case, however, can more than two courses taken abroad count toward the certificate. A maximum of one course taught in English may be counted toward the certificate, provided that all written work is submitted in Spanish.
    2. Independent work. During their senior year, students are required to submit a paper on the topic designated on their application. (See deadline information above.) The paper must be written in Spanish; be at least 6,000 words in length; and be an extension of a paper written for one of the courses taken toward the certificate. Advisers are not assigned. One additional 300-level (or higher) SPA course may be substituted for the independent work. 
    3. Students interested in earning a certificate in another department's program and in Spanish may earn both certificates provided that: (a) different courses are used to fulfill the requirements for each certificate*; and (b) the student produces two different pieces of independent work. *In agreement with the Program in Latin American Studies, one course can be used toward a certificate in both SPA and PLAS.
    Portuguese
    1. Three department-based POR courses above the 100 level on the literature and cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world. At least one of these three courses must be at the 200 level. No course taught in English can count toward the certificate. Courses must be taken for a letter grade, no pass/D/fail or audit. **NOTE: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, spring '20 and academic year '20–'21 courses taken PDF will be accepted.** At the discretion of the director of undergraduate studies, students who study abroad during the academic year may count one preapproved course per semester abroad toward the certificate. One Princeton summer abroad course offered through the department would also count, provided that it is taught in Portuguese. Two preapproved courses in a summer program abroad other than Princeton's can count as one course toward the certificate, provided that they are taught in Portuguese. In no case, however, can more than one course taken abroad count toward the certificate.
    2. Independent work. During their senior year, students are required to submit a paper on the topic designated on their application. (See deadline information above.) The paper must be written in Portuguese; be at least 6,000 words in length (title page); and be an extension of a paper written for one of the courses taken toward the certificate. Advisers are not assigned. One additional upper-division POR course (above the 100-level)  may be substituted for the independent work.
    3. Students interested in earning a certificate in another department's program and in Portuguese may earn both certificates provided that: (a) different courses are used to fulfill the requirements for each certificate*; and (b) the student produces two different pieces of independent work. *In agreement with the Program in Latin American Studies, one course can be used toward a certificate in both POR and PLAS.

    Students who are pursuing a certificate in Spanish and/or Portuguese must also become familiar with the certificate rules established by the Program in Language and Culture. Upon graduation, students who have met all of the program requirements will have the certificate noted on their record and receive a certificate of proficiency along with their diploma.

     

    Faculty

    • Chair

      • Christina H. Lee (acting)
      • Pedro Meira Monteiro
    • Director of Undergraduate Studies

      • Rafael Cesar (interim)
    • Director of Graduate Studies

      • Javier E. Guerrero
    • Professor

      • Marina S. Brownlee
      • Rubén Gallo
      • Germán Labrador Méndez
      • Christina H. Lee
      • Pedro Meira Monteiro
      • Gabriela Nouzeilles
    • Associate Professor

      • Javier E. Guerrero
      • Rachel L. Price
    • Assistant Professor

      • Natalia Castro Picón
      • Rafael Cesar
      • Nicole D. Legnani
    • Associated Faculty

      • Jeremy I. Adelman, History
      • Aisha M. Beliso-De Jesús, Effron Center Study of America
      • João Biehl, Anthropology
      • Eduardo L. Cadava, English
      • Susana Draper, Comparative Literature
      • Irene V. Small, Art and Archaeology
    • University Lecturer

      • Alberto Bruzos Moro
    • Senior Lecturer

      • Gorka Bilbao Terreros
      • Mariana Bono
      • Nicola T. Cooney
      • Adriana G. Merino
      • Dunia Catalina Méndez Vallejo
    • Lecturer

      • Anna Alsina Naudi
      • Catalina Arango
      • Nadia Cervantes Pérez
      • Maria F. Chiaramonte
      • Luis Enrique Escamilla Frias
      • Yvonne Gavela-Ramos
      • Luis Gonçalves
      • Iris I. Hauser
      • Eliana P. Hernandez Pachon
      • Anais Holgado-Lage
      • Raquel Mattson-Prieto
      • Paloma Moscardó-Vallés
      • Eduardo Negueruela Azarola
      • Eliot Raynor
      • Cesar Adrian Romero Fernandez
      • Maria A. Saiz Angulo
      • Amina B. Shabani
      • Andréa de Castro Melloni
    • Visiting Professor

      • Luis A. Fischer
      • Lilia K. Moritz Schwarcz
    • Visiting Associate Professor

      • Luis Moreno Caballud

    For a full list of faculty members and fellows please visit the department or program website.

    Courses

    POR 101 - Introduction to Portuguese I Fall

    Students will be taught the fundamental skills of oral comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, while gaining exposure to the Portuguese-speaking world through the media, literature, film and the music of Brazil, Portugal and Lusophone Africa. L. Gonçalves

    POR 102 - Introduction to Portuguese II Spring

    A continuation of POR 101. Students will continue to develop skills of oral/aural comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, while gaining further exposure to the Portuguese-speaking world through the media, literature, film and music of Brazil, Portugal and Lusophone Africa. Students who successfully complete POR 102 will place into POR 107. L. Gonçalves

    POR 106 - Introduction to Portuguese for Spanish Speakers Fall/Spring

    Normally open to students already proficient in Spanish, French, or Italian, this course uses that knowledge as a basis for the accelerated learning of Portuguese. Emphasis on the concurrent development of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Three classes. Prerequisite: Spanish 107 or equivalent, or instructor's permission. L. Gonçalves

    POR 107 - Intermediate Portuguese Fall

    Students will continue to develop their speaking, reading and writing skills while being exposed to realia related to the Lusophone world, such as daily news, reports, short stories, chronicles, videos, films, critical reviews, etc. Through different communicative genres, students will learn not only the language but also the culture, art and lifestyle of a range of Portuguese-speaking societies. L. Gonçalves

    POR 109 - Intermediate Portuguese for Spanish Speakers Fall/Spring

    Students will continue to develop their language skills, especially those of comprehension and written and oral expression through grammar study, readings, film, music, and other activities. Students will read and discuss one novel in Portuguese and will gain further exposure to the cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world. Three classes. Prerequisite: POR 106 or instructor's permission. A. de Castro Melloni

    POR 199 - Intensive Portuguese Fall/Spring

    An intensive course designed for students who have fulfilled the language requirement in Spanish or another Romance language. Knowledge of one of these languages provides the basis for the accelerated learning of Portuguese. This intensive one-semester course teaches fundamental communication skills of comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing and provides some exposure to cultural aspects of the Portuguese-speaking world. Two 90-minute classes. A. de Castro Melloni

    POR 208 - Journeys in Portuguese: Studies in Language and Culture

    Designed as a journey through the Portuguese-speaking world, this course seeks to present the Portuguese language in context by exploring historical, social, political, and cultural aspects of Brazil, Portugal, Portuguese-speaking Africa and Asia through media, literature, film, music, and other activities. Students will increase their fluency and accuracy in both written and spoken Portuguese, broadening their vocabulary and mastery of syntax through textual analysis, discussions, oral presentations, and grammar review. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: 109 or instructor's permission. L. Gonçalves

    POR 209 - Portuguese Cultural Themes

    An advanced language and culture course looking at a variety of themes pertaining to the contemporary Portuguese-speaking world. Discussions and compositions expand knowledge of grammar and increase fluency in written and spoken Portuguese, providing a solid foundation for further study of literature and culture. Prerequisite: POR 109 or instructor's permission. Two 90-minute classes. Staff

    POR 221 - Introduction to the Literature and Culture of the Portuguese-Speaking World (also LAS 223) LA

    Through readings of selected texts and audiovisual materials, this course introduces students to the diverse cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world. Discussions focus on Portugal's expansion during early modern times, and the spread of the Portuguese language in the Americas, Asia, and Africa. Contemporary issues in several geographic areas will be approached comparatively. Prerequisite: POR 208 or instructor's permission. Two 90-minute classes. Staff

    POR 300 - Luso-Afro-Brazilian Literary Traditions (also LAS 315) LA

    This course focuses on works that have been key for shaping the literary tradition of the Portuguese language, from colonial to postcolonial times. Discussions will focus on the intersections between literature, social change, identity, and history in Brazil, Portugal, and Lusophone Africa. Prerequisite: POR 208 or instructor's permission. Two 90-minute classes. Staff

    POR 301 - Modern Brazilian Literature and Culture (also LAS 303) LA

    A study of 19th- to 21st-century Brazilian texts with the aim of defining the place of Brazilian literature and culture within the context of Latin America and beyond. To include writers like Machado de Assis, Oswald de Andrade, Guimarães Rosa, Drummond, João Cabral, Clarice Lispector, and Caetano Veloso. Prerequisite: POR 208 or instructor's permission. Two 90-minute classes. Staff

    POR 304 - Topics in Brazilian Cultural and Social History (also LAS 311) LA

    Through the analysis of literary texts, films, and music, the course will consider cultural responses to the construction of a Brazilian national identity. Possible topics include the Brazilian modernist tradition; contemporary culture and media; the city and literature; poetry and song. Prerequisites: POR 208 or instructor's permission. Two 90-minute classes. Staff

    POR 319 - Brazilian Cinema (also LAS 319/VIS 346) LA

    An introduction to the richness of Brazilian film, this course explores major cinematic movements: from the Cinema Novo, to critically acclaimed documentaries and more recent commercial successes like City of God. Recurrent and emerging trends will be discussed (e.g., the destruction of the Amazon, urban violence, literary adaptation, musical expressions). Prerequisite: POR 208 or instructor's permission. One three-hour class. Staff

    POR 411 - Latin American Studies Seminar (also LAS 404/SPA 410) Not offered this year LA

    SPA 101 - Beginner's Spanish I Fall

    An integrated approach to develop the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish in a cultural context to foster cultural awareness of the Spanish-speaking world. Class activities are devoted to acquiring and developing communicative and cultural competence through aural/oral practice, reading strategies, vocabulary acquisition, and language production. Audiovisual and other media resources are included. Five classes. A. Merino

    SPA 102 - Beginner's Spanish II Spring

    A continuation of SPA 101. The course continues to stress oral/aural practice with added emphasis on reading and communicative writing strategies. Students will read and analyze literary and cultural texts. Increased expression will be fostered through composition editing, videos, music, and film commentaries. Audiovisual and other media resources are included. Five classes. Prerequisite: SPA 101. The next course in this sequence is SPA 107. E. Raynor

    SPA 103 - Intensive Beginner's and Intermediate Spanish Fall

    An intensive course that combines 101 and 102 in one semester. Designed for students who have previously studied Spanish. An integrated approach that emphasizes developing and reinforcing language skills. Students will be introduced to various cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world through literary readings, videos, music, and films. Audiovisual and other media resources are included. Five classes. Prerequisites: satisfactory score on Princeton Spanish placement test and instructor's permission. Followed by SPA 107. E. Raynor

    SPA 105 - Intermediate Spanish Fall

    Specially designed for students with a good foundation in Spanish. Class activities reinforce language skills through aural/oral practice, grammar review, vocabulary acquisition, reading, editing, composition, oral presentations, and discussion of contemporary Spanish short stories, music, and films. Three classes. Prerequisites: a satisfactory score on the Princeton Spanish placement test. Normally followed by 108. N. Cervantes Pérez

    SPA 107 - Intermediate/Advanced Spanish Fall/Spring

    Designed for students who have successfully completed SPA 102 or SPA 103. An integrated approach to increase comprehension, and oral and written expression. Class activities reinforce language skills through aural/oral practice, grammar review, vocabulary acquisition, reading, editing compositions, oral presentations, and discussion. Students will develop their reading comprehension, oral proficiency, and writing skills through various multimedia activities. Five classes. Prerequisite: SPA 101-102 or SPA 103. I. Hauser

    SPA 108 - Advanced Spanish Fall/Spring

    An intensive course designed to prepare students to enter 200-level courses, with an emphasis on reading, speaking, and writing. The course is aimed at developing advanced language skills through frequent writing exercises, oral presentations, discussions of current events, literary texts, music, and film. Three classes. Prerequisite: 105 or satisfactory score on the Princeton Spanish placement test. G. Bilbao Terreros

    SPA 205 - Medical Spanish Fall/Spring

    An advanced level Spanish course on health and medical topics. Its main purpose is to provide the students with vocabulary and linguistic skills to discuss medical issues, and to prepare them to interact with Spanish speakers in a healthcare environment in the U.S. or Latin America. The course is focused on both oral and written skills. It will also explore some aspects of the Spanish-speaking culture in the fields of health and medicine through authentic documents and the contribution of guest speakers. P. Moscardó-Vallés

    SPA 206 - Legal and Business Spanish Spring

    An advanced level Spanish course on legal and business language. The aim is to provide students with a new vocabulary for classroom discussions, readings and practice in a guided legal and business-related context. This course enables a deeper understanding of grammatical concepts previously presented as well as the syntactical and lexical challenges typical of this specific area of the Spanish language. Students will also be introduced to the basics of a completely different legal system and different business cultures, through texts, discussions, research, translation practice, situational case studies, and videos. A. Alsina Naudi

    SPA 207 - Studies in Spanish Language and Style Fall/Spring

    An advanced course in Spanish composition and conversation designed to give students increased fluency and expertise in written and verbal Spanish skills. Extensive review of grammar and vocabulary through written and oral exercises. Course material includes literary texts, news-related publications, and films. Three classes. Prerequisite: SPA 107 or SPA 108 or equivalent AP/SAT score. A. Holgado-Lage

    SPA 209 - Spanish Language and Culture through Cinema Fall/Spring

    Designed to enhance oral and written skills in Spanish while increasing familiarity with Hispanic cultures through cinema. Language skills development is connected to the content of films and will be combined with in-class debates on cultural topics and writing of compositions. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: SPA 107 or SPA 108 or equivalent AP/SAT score. A. Shabani

    SPA 210 - Introduction to Spanish-English Translation (also TRA 210) Not offered this year LA

    This course offers an introduction to translation practice for the Spanish-English language pair, focusing primarily on the task of translating from Spanish into English. However, students will also carry out a number of brief English into Spanish translation tasks. The course is conducted entirely in Spanish and follows a communicative approach to translation, with a good balance between theory and praxis. It will provide students with a solid foundation in the field, and prepare them to take more specialized translation courses. Staff

    SPA 211 - Varieties of Spanish (also LIN 211) Spring SA

    Offered as an overview of sociolinguistic variation in the Spanish-speaking world, students will learn about social, political, and cultural aspects related to dialectal variation in Spanish and become acquainted with important linguistic features present in various dialects. Upon completion of the course, students become familiarized with particular features distinguishing one dialect from another, while gaining knowledge of the development of these differences. This course will greatly enrich a student's view of Spanish, either as a native/heritage speaker or Spanish learner, and allows for the development of analytical skills. D. Méndez Vallejo

    SPA 221 - Introduction to Medieval and Early Modern Spanish Cultures LA

    Major developments in Spanish literature and civilization from the Muslim conquest to the 17th century. Beliefs and attitudes underlying the rise of the Spanish empire and the ways in which the interaction (convivencia) of Christians, Jews, and Muslims brought about the cultural differentiation of Spain within the European context. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: 207 or higher, or instructor's permission. M. Brownlee

    SPA 222 - Introduction to Latin American Cultures (also LAO 222/LAS 222) Fall CDLA

    Introduction to modern Latin American cultural and literary traditions with emphasis on the political uses of writing and art, national identity vis-à-vis popular and indigenous groups, memory and representation, the definition of modernity, and trans-American dialogues. The course may focus on national foundational fictions, the literary and artistic avant-gardes of the 1920s and 1960s, Mexican and Peruvian indigenismo, and memory art and cinema. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: SPA 207 or higher, or instructor's permission. Strongly recommended before 300-level courses. G. Nouzeilles

    SPA 224 - Hispanic Studies: Introduction to Cultural Analysis LA

    An introduction to textual analysis and interpretation of Hispanic literatures. The course will be organized on discussions of various genre (narrative, poetry, drama, essay). Readings will include authors from early and modern periods from Spain and Latin America, such as Garcilaso de la Vega, Cervantes, Calderón de la Barca, Miguel de Unamuno, García Lorca, Sor Juana, José Hernández, Rubén Darío, Jorge Luis Borges, Mario Vargas Llosa, and Margo Glantz. Popular music and film will also be studied. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: 107 or 108, or instructor's permission. Staff

    SPA 227 - Contemporary Issues in Spain (also EPS 227/URB 237) LA

    This course will focus on current political, social, and cultural issues in Latin America and/or Spain, including social movements, new artistic developments, economic changes, environmental debates, globalization and culture, politics of memory, immigration and cultural conflicts, nationalist movements, etc. Each semester, the course will focus on one of two particular regions and countries, such as the Southern Cone, the Andean region, Central America, Brazil, Mexico and the borderlands, Spain, etc. This course will also strengthen the students' conversational skills through team discussion and oral presentations. G. Labrador Méndez

    SPA 300 - The Literature and Culture of Spain and Colonial Latin America: Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque (also LAS 300) LA

    Through selected texts from Spain and colonial Latin America, the course will explore the formation of a literary tradition in Spanish. The main objective is to foster comparative studies within literatures and cultures of the Spanish-speaking world so as to identify points of contact and differentiation currently defining this field of studies. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Prerequisite: one 200-level Spanish course. Staff

    SPA 301 - Topics in Medieval and Early Modern Spanish Culture (also COM 368/MED 301) LA

    Poetry, prose, and drama of the Golden Age. Readings might include the works of authors such as Garcilaso, Saint Theresa, Saint John of the Cross, Góngora, Quevedo, Lope de Vega, and Calderón. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: a 200-level Spanish course or instructor's permission. Staff

    SPA 302 - Medieval Spanish Literature LA

    Spanish literature and culture from the early Middle Ages to the beginning of the 16th century. Emphasis on both literary works (most read in modernized versions) and original documents. Special attention will be given to medieval Spain's pluralistic society of Christians, Muslims, and Jews. Prerequisite: a 200-level course in Spanish or instructor's permission. Two 90-minute seminars. Staff

    SPA 303 - Spanish Literature and Culture: Modern Spain 1700 to Present LA

    Key literary works are analyzed in relation to main cultural, political, and social currents in Spain in the last three centuries. The course combines analysis of specific texts with a panoramic view of the complex articulation of cultural forces that have led to the present configuration of contemporary Spain. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: a 200-level Spanish course or instructor's permission. N. Castro Picón

    SPA 305 - Topics in Spanish Civilization of the Golden Age LA

    Selected literary forms and themes in relation to the major historical, social, and cultural currents of the Golden Age. Possible topics include the function of the theater in the absolutist state; the Inquisition and the literature of alienation; the impact of the Counter-Reformation on artistic activity; the image of woman in literature. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: a 200-level Spanish course or instructor's permission. Staff

    SPA 306 - Cervantes and His Age (also COM 315) LA

    Since 1605, Don Quixote has elicited passionate reactions: Faulkner read it once a year, as some read the Bible, while Malraux saw it as the most meaningful book for survivors of concentration camps. Quixote has been construed in disparate ways, from debating good and bad reading and writing, to mocking the medieval world view; from exploring the serious impact of the printing press, to benevolently satirizing the conquistadors; from being a study of deviant social behavior and the nature of madness, to a meditation on human sexuality and ageing. One lecture, two precepts. Prerequisite: a 200-level Spanish course or equivalent. M. Brownlee

    SPA 307 - Advanced Reading and Writing in Spanish Fall/Spring LA

    An advanced language course which develops and reinforces accuracy and fluency in both writing and speaking Spanish. Students will learn to identify linguistic features that characterize different genres, as well as social and cultural factors that aid in the interpretation and understanding of different texts and types of speech. The course also aims at providing the tools for discourse analysis, raising awareness of the social and ideological values that permeate discursive practices, and developing autonomy and proficiency as an advanced learner of Spanish language. Three classes. Prerequisite: One 200-level SPA course. D. Méndez Vallejo

    SPA 309 - Translation: Cultures in Context LA

    An introduction to the study and practice of translation, this course provides students with an awareness of the complex tasks involved in translating written materials from one cultural context to another. The cultural encounter between the Hispanic and the Anglo-Saxon will be explored through the translation of increasingly difficult texts--newspaper articles, interviews, economic reports, and scientific articles. Through the examination of the students' own translations, the course will study the process of cultural exchange between Spanish and English. Prerequisite: 307. One three-hour seminar. Staff

    SPA 312 - The Dramatic Expression of the Golden Age LA

    A survey of the major forms of Spanish drama of the Golden Age, including plays by Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, and Calderón. Emphasis on the development of the theater in relation to the rise of the absolutist state, the Counter-Reformation, and the impact of the Inquisition on Spanish society. Prerequisite: a 200-level Spanish course. Two 90-minute classes. M. Brownlee

    SPA 317 - Topics in the Cultural Expression of Protest and Dissent in Spain LA

    Topics may include the literature of non-Castilian cultures in the Peninsula; the nonconformist drama of Galdós, Unamuno, Valle-Inclán, and García Lorca; the artist against the state (poets, essayists, and novelists under the Franco regime); the commitments of the avant-garde. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: a 200-level Spanish course or instructor's permission. Staff

    SPA 319 - Topics in Cinema and Culture (also LAS 354) LA

    Major cinematic movements in Latin America and/or Spain: their influence and their relationship to literary and cultural issues. Possible topics include: the art of adaptation of narrative to film or Spanish surrealism. Two 90-minute seminars. Prerequisite: 207 or instructor's permission. N. Legnani

    SPA 320 - Modern Spanish Fiction LA

    The development of the novel and short story, as art forms, from 19th-century realism to the avant-garde of the 1920s and 1930s. An analysis of literary problems and their historical background, drawing on the works of Galdós, Clarín, Unamuno, Baroja, Valle-Inclán, Miró, and others. Prerequisite: a 200-level Spanish course or equivalent. Staff

    SPA 321 - Topics in the Intellectual History of Modern and Contemporary Spain (also LAS 321) LA

    Special attention to its European context. Course may focus on a few important essayists (such as Ortega, Unamuno, d'Ors, and Zambrano) or may trace the development of an influential idea (such as the function of art, the individual and the masses) or map the characteristics of a certain period. One three-hour seminar. Prerequisite: a 200-level Spanish course or equivalent. Staff

    SPA 326 - Modern Spanish Poetry LA

    Poetry from the late 19th century to the Spanish Civil War, considering modernismo and the generations of '98 and '27 in relation to European symbolism and the avant-garde. One three hour seminar. Prerequisite: a 200-level Spanish course or equivalent. G. Labrador Méndez

    SPA 331 - Modern Latin American Fiction (also LAS 331) LA

    Major themes, forms, and techniques in Latin American novels and short stories. Close analysis of texts by Borges, Rulfo, García Márquez, Bolaño, Vallejo, and others. Consideration will be given to historical contexts and contemporary ideological currents. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: a 200-level Spanish course or instructor's permission. Staff

    SPA 332 - Modern Latin American Poetry (also LAS 332) LA

    An introduction to the major poets and poetic trends in modern Latin America and the Caribbean, with emphasis on Martí, Darío, Huidobro, Vallejo, Mistral, Neruda, Palés Matos, Borges, and Saer. Special attention also to the rich oral traditions represented by popular genres such as boleros, tango, nueva canción and rock, and particularly the work of Silvio Rodríguez, Violeta Parra, Rubén Blades, Tite Curet Alonso, and Charly García available in audio recordings or videos. Two 90-minute seminars. Prerequisite: a 200-level Spanish course or equivalent. Staff

    SPA 333 - Cultural Systems (also COM 389/ECS 321) Not offered this year LA

    SPA 342 - Topics in Latin American Modernity (also LAS 342) Fall LA

    The development of cultural patterns and literary forms in Spanish America since the late 19th century. Topics may include: the importance of oral traditions and popular music in forging identities; the literary and ideological import of modernismo, travel literature in the 19th century; and the avant-garde movements of the 1920s. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: a 200-level Spanish course or instructor's permission. Staff

    SPA 343 - The Invention of Latin American Traditions (also LAS 343) LA

    Fundamental texts of Spanish American literature from colonial times to the present. In a given semester the course could focus on works by Garcilaso, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Sarmiento, José Hernandez, Martí, Borges, Mariátegui, Palés Matos, Henríquez Ureña, or Lezama Lima. Two 90-minute seminars. Prerequisite: a 200-level Spanish course or instructor's permission. Staff

    SPA 344 - Literature and Society in Early Latin America (also LAS 344) LA

    This seminar studies literary, legal, and historical writings in relation to such topics as imperialism and colonialism, the image of the "Indian," cultural identities, and rhetoric and politics, from the writings of Columbus and the cartographic imagination to the formation of the new criollo culture in the vice-regal city. Texts from the following authors will be carefully analyzed: Cortés, Cabeza de Vaca, Las Casas, Garcilaso de la Vega, Huaman Poma, and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz. Two 90-minute seminars. Prerequisite: a 200-level Spanish course or instructor's permission. Staff

    SPA 345 - Topics in Latin American Literature and Ideology (also LAS 345) LA

    Latin American and Caribbean thought from 1800 to the present, focusing on the conflicting cultural and ideological assumptions of liberalism and nationalism. Topics might include slavery and literature, the writing of history, the intellectuals and power, or the writings of some major figures such as Bolívar, Hostos, Martí, Mariátegui, Fernando Ortiz, or Paz. Two 90-minute seminars. Prerequisite: a 200-level Spanish course or instructor's permission. S. Draper

    SPA 346 - Modern Latin American Fiction in Translation (also COM 346/LAS 364) LA

    Readings and discussion of authors such as Machado de Assis, Cortázar, Lispector, García Márquez, Vargas Llosa, and Puig, considered in relation to the cultures of Latin America and to trends of modern European and American fiction. Does not count as a departmental course for Spanish majors unless readings and papers are done in Spanish. Three hour lecture. Prerequisite: a 200-level Spanish course or instructor's permission. R. Gallo

    SPA 348 - Fictions and Communities in the Andes (also LAS 348) Not offered this year LA

    How is the complexity of the Andes imagined or resolved in its literatures? This seminar will study the plurality of narrations and communities that constitute the Andean world, focusing primarily on Peru and two of its major intellectual movements in the 20th century: the indigenismo and the criollo urban literature. Aspects of the Afro-Peruvian narratives will also be studied. Major authors discussed include: Ricardo Palma, Clorinda Matto, González Prada, Mariátegui, Arguedas, Vargas Llosa, Bryce, Ribeyro, Gregorio Martínez. Conducted in Spanish. Two 90-minute seminars. Prerequisite: a 200-level Spanish course or instructor's permission. Staff

    SPA 349 - The Lyric (also COM 309/ENG 420) Not offered this year LA

    SPA 350 - Topics in Latin American Cultural Studies (also LAS 349) Fall LA

    A course focusing on elements of Latin American culture that left a strong mark on the history, literature, and arts of the region. Recent topics include the representation of Che Guevara in novels, film, and photography; the literary response to Tango in Argentina; the impact of the invention of radio in avant-garde poetry. The course will emphasize the connections between history, literature, arts, and visual culture of the region. Two 90-minute seminars. Prerequisite: a 200-level Spanish course or instructor's permission. N. Legnani

    SPA 351 - Topics in the Culture of Cities (also LAS 347) LA

    An overview of the cultural production and history of major cities in the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking worlds. Possible topics include Mexico City, Barcelona, Saõ Paulo, Buenos Aires, Havana, and Madrid. The course will examine the representation of the city in literature (poetry and prose), film, painting, photography, and music. Discussions will focus on how historical events determine the possibilities of representation. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: a 200-level Spanish course or instructor's permission. Staff

    SPA 352 - Topics in the Politics of Writing and Difference (also LAS 356) LA

    A course analyzing various Latin American literary and written traditions produced by, in dialogue with, or on behalf of subjects who have an ambiguous relationship with dominant forms of written expression, for example: indigenous people, black people, and women. Special attention will be given to slave narratives, testimonio, autobiography, and the indigenista novel. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: a 200-level Spanish course or instructor's permission. Staff

    SPA 353 - Topics in Gender and Representation (also COM 354/LAS 353) LA

    An examination of the relationship between gender and genre, between the author's experience as a gendered subject, and experiments with literary form. Topics might include women's writing, gay literature, and the aesthetics of camp. Discussions will emphasize the link between experimental forms of writing and the experience of history as a gendered subject. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: a 200-level Spanish course or instructor's permission. Staff

    SPA 380 - Translation Workshop: Spanish to English (also TRA 380) Spring LA

    This workshop-style course will focus on developing the student's skills in translating short texts from Spanish into English. Each week one or two students will present their translations from a selection of poems and short stories by writers like Octavio Paz, Carlos Fuentes, Elena Poniatowska, Julio Cortázar, and many others. Students will also read theoretical texts about translation. Several professional translators will visit the class during the semester and present examples from their own work to the class. Prerequisite: reading knowledge of Spanish. One three-hour seminar. N. Wimmer

    SPA 381 - Topics in the Theory of Translation Not offered this year LA

    An overview of recent debates about the practice of translation with special emphasis on how these ideas have been applied in translations of literary works by poets, novelists, and thinkers like Octavio Paz, Alfonso Reyes, Jorge Luis Borges, José Lezama Lima, and José Ortega y Gasset. Readings include essays on translation by Walter Benjamin, Vladimir Nabokov, Georges Steiner, and Lawrence Venutti. Students will be asked to translate a literary text from Spanish to English. Prerequisite: 307. One three-hour seminar. Staff

    SPA 401 - Topics in Hispanic Culture (Europe and America) (also LAS 428) LA

    Possible topics might include: modernity, empire, and colonialism, European travel literature in Latin America, the encounter of Latin America, and North American cultural traditions. One three-hour seminar. Prerequisite: a 300-level Spanish course or instructor's permission. Staff

    SPA 412 - Latin American Studies Seminar (also LAO 401/LAS 401) Not offered this year LA