Chinese Language

Program Offerings

The Department of East Asian Studies offers a wide range of undergraduate classes at the highest standards of academic, linguistic and cultural competence focused on China, Japan and Korea. It provides an opportunity for students who plan to major in other disciplines to simultaneously pursue a high level of proficiency in one or more East Asian language (Chinese, Japanese and Korean) and acquire the basic knowledge about the literature, history and culture of East Asia. The student’s work is supervised by the faculty members of the department, whose work covers East Asian literature, history, film and media, and anthropology. Students are also encouraged to work with other faculty members conducting research in and teaching on East Asia.

Goals for Student Learning

The main learning goal of the Chinese language minor is to acquire a solid grasp of the language. There are three components of this overall goal. First, the student will take six language courses, two or more of which must be beyond the second-year level. After taking these courses, students will have the ability to read, write, listen and speak in Chinese. The student is also required to take one or more EAS-prefix course or cognate course related to East Asia, giving a foundation in some aspects of East Asian culture. Finally, the student is required to complete a substantial piece of research (20–25 pages) based at least in part on primary sources in Chinese language. These components ensure that the student not only acquires a high level of language competency but also can apply this competency in original research that is well-informed by an understanding of East Asian culture and history.

Admission to the Program

The program is open to undergraduates in all departments. Students interested in earning a minor are encouraged to apply no earlier than the spring of sophomore year and no later than the spring of junior year. Final application materials, including the written work form, should be filed with the Department of East Asian Studies office by the deadline of one week before Dean's Date in the spring of the student's senior year, at the latest.

Program of Study

A student majoring in a department other than East Asian studies may earn a language minor in Chinese by completing seven courses, including six language courses (two or more of which must be beyond the second-year level) and at least one EAS or cognate course. An East Asian studies major specializing in Japanese or Korean language may earn a language minor in Chinese, but may not also earn an East Asian studies minor offered by the Program in East Asian Studies. Courses taken on a pass/D/fail basis will not be counted.

Students must also complete a substantial piece of research (20–25 pages) based at least in part on Chinese language sources dealing with aspects of East Asia. The topic must be in the humanities or social sciences. The paper could be either an original piece of research or a junior paper or senior thesis. If the paper or senior thesis is written for another department, at least half of the work must be on East Asia.

Students placing into language courses beyond the second-year level should plan to satisfy the language course requirements for the minor with higher level courses. If there are no suitable higher level language courses available, students may seek permission from the EAS director of undergraduate studies to substitute some EAS-prefixed and cognate courses for language work.

Independent Work

The written work requirement can be a paper written exclusively/independently for the language minor, another piece of work (i.e., a senior thesis, junior paper or substantial seminar paper), or a hybrid (i.e., a previous paper that is independently expanded to meet all criteria).

Study Abroad

Courses taken abroad in summer language programs (i.e., Princeton in Beijing) or over the course of a semester or year at other institutions may count toward minor requirements. Preapproval for any non-Princeton program coursework must be obtained from the EAS director of undergraduate studies.

Additional Information

For additional information and application instructions, please contact EAS undergraduate administrator Anna Lovett ([email protected]).

Please consult the Program in East Asian Studies offerings page for more information on the East Asian Studies minor.

Faculty

  • Chair

    • Anna M. Shields
  • Director of Undergraduate Studies

    • Xin Wen
  • Director of Graduate Studies

    • Atsuko Ueda
  • Professor

    • Amy B. Borovoy
    • Janet Y. Chen
    • Thomas D. Conlan
    • Sheldon M. Garon
    • Martin Kern
    • Anna M. Shields
    • Atsuko Ueda
  • Associate Professor

    • He Bian
    • Ksenia Chizhova
    • Steven Chung
    • Paize Keulemans
    • Federico Marcon
    • Brian R. Steininger
  • Assistant Professor

    • Xin Wen
    • Trenton W. Wilson
    • Junko Yamazaki
  • Associated Faculty

    • Jonathan C. Gold, Religion
    • Thomas W. Hare, Comparative Literature
    • G. John Ikenberry, Schl of Public & Int'l Affairs
    • Bryan D. Lowe, Religion
    • Ryo Morimoto, Anthropology
    • James M. Raymo, Sociology
    • Stephen F. Teiser, Religion
    • Rory Truex, Schl of Public & Int'l Affairs
    • Cheng-hua Wang, Art and Archaeology
    • Andrew M. Watsky, Art and Archaeology
    • Yu Xie, Sociology
  • University Lecturer

    • Shinji Sato
  • Senior Lecturer

    • Ho Jung Choi
    • Tomoko Shibata
    • Yukari Tokumasu
    • Jing Wang
  • Lecturer

    • Jin Dong
    • Fang-Yen Hsieh
    • Luanfeng Huang
    • Xinyue Huang
    • TAE NA KIM
    • Susie Kim
    • Jue Lu
    • Yinqiu Ma
    • Hisae Matsui
    • Ying Ou
    • Zheyu Su
    • Megumi Watanabe
    • Fang Yan
    • Namseok Yong
    • Yuseon Yun
    • Jieyun Zhu
  • Visiting Professor

    • Nicola Di Cosmo

For a full list of faculty members and fellows please visit the department or program website.

Courses

CHI 1001 - Introductory Chinese I Spring

CHI 1001 and CHI 1002, are introductory Chinese courses for true beginners. This course will be taught at half the pace of instruction compared to Elementary Chinese (CHI 101/CHI 102). The goal of this course is to develop students' four basic communication skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing, using both the Pinyin system, and simplified Chinese characters. After taking CHI 1001 and CHI 1002, students will have developed basic abilities to handle simple survival situations in Chinese, to read and write over 300 Chinese characters, and be well prepared for more advanced and intensive study in Chinese. Three hours of class. Staff

CHI 1002 - Introductory Chinese II

Introductory Chinese (CHI 1002) is a continuation of CHI 1001, an introductory course for true beginners. It is taught at half the instructional pace of First Year Chinese (CHI 101). The goal of this course is to develop students' four basic communication skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing, using both the Pinyin Romanization phonetic system and simplified (modern) Chinese characters. By the end of this course, students will be able to handle simple "survival situations" in Chinese, read and write over 300 Chinese characters, and engage in more advanced and intensive study of Chinese in the future. Staff

CHI 101 - Elementary Chinese I Fall

An introductory course in modern spoken and written Chinese, stressing oral-aural facility and the integration of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Five hours of class. Staff

CHI 102 - Elementary Chinese II Spring

Continued study of modern spoken and written Chinese, stressing listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Five hours of class. Staff

CHI 103 - Intensive Elementary Chinese Fall

An intensive course covering CHI 101 and CHI 102 in one semester for beginning heritage learners and students with fair fluency and limited ability in reading and writing skills. This course will emphasize the integration of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.. Prerequisite: instructor's permission (oral interview in Chinese). Five hours of class. Staff

CHI 105 - Intermediate Chinese I Fall

A study of modern spoken and written Chinese, this course shifts the emphasis to the reading of contemporary Chinese dialogues and short essays on daily life topics. While reinforcing the knowledge students have acquired thus far, this course will further develop the students' audio-lingual proficiency and bring their reading and writing ability to a higher level. Five hours of class. Staff

CHI 107 - Intermediate Chinese II Spring

Continuing the study of modern spoken and written Chinese, this course shifts the emphasis to the reading of contemporary Chinese cultural and social issues. Five hours of class. Staff

CHI 107C - Intermediate Chinese II in Beijing

A four-week summer intensive language course taught in Beijing, China, at Beijing Normal University, which is a continuation of 105C. This course continues the intensive study of modern spoken and written Chinese and includes the study of modern cultural and social issues. Admission by application. Prerequisite: 105C or equivalent. Five two-hour classes, five two-hour drill sessions, plus individual tutorial sessions. Staff

CHI 108 - Intensive Intermediate Chinese Spring

An intensive course that covers 105 and 107 in one semester for students who have completed CHI 103. This course will emphasize reading and writing skills and the analysis of grammar. After CHI 108, students are ready for third-year courses.. Prerequisite: CHI 103 or instructor's permission. Five hours of class. Staff

CHI 301 - Introduction to Classical Chinese I Fall HA

CHI 301 provides basic training for students in classical Chinese and introduces students to theme-based readings about important cultural aspects of pre-modern China, such as the concept of Dao, life and death, Confucian ethics, etc. Each theme consists of passages selected from Chinese classics and short essays or stories full of wisdom and wit from later dynasties. This course will not only improve your four skills in Chinese language (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) but will also enhance your understanding of traditional Chinese philosophy and culture. Three hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Staff

CHI 302 - Introduction to Classical Chinese II Spring HA

Following CHI 301, the purpose of this course is to introduce the fundamental grammar of classical Chinese and to read short, original texts from different periods and genres. It also provides theme-based readings about important cultural aspects of pre-modern China, such as conceptions of filial piety, warfare, conflicts between righteousness and profit. Questions such as these were at the heart of Chinese intellectual debates. Three hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Staff

CHI 303 - Third-Year Modern Chinese I Fall

Designed to further develop the student's overall language skills through reading and discussion of contemporary affairs in both China and the U.S. in the form of dialogue and short essays. Prerequisite: CHI 105-107, or instructor's permission. Four hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Staff

CHI 304 - Third-Year Modern Chinese II Spring

A continuation of CHI 303, designed to improve the student's facility in written and oral expression through a close study of short essays selected and composed for advanced level students. Discussion topics are closely related to contemporary Chinese society. Prerequisite: CHI 303 or instructor's permission. Four hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Staff

CHI 305 - Intensive Third-Year Modern Chinese I Fall

Chinese 305 will further develop student's overall language skills through readings and discussion of contemporary issues published in Chinese media. This course is designed for students who have familiarity with spoken Mandarin or any Chinese dialect. Four hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Staff

CHI 306 - Intensive Third-Year Modern Chinese II Spring

A continuation of CHI 305, designed to further improve the student's facility in written and oral expression through a close study of essays selected and composed for advanced level students. Prerequisite: CHI 305 or instructor's permission. Four hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Staff

CHI 401 - Advanced Classical Chinese I Not offered this year LA

Intensive introduction to classical Chinese through the study of selections from ancient texts. Four hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Staff

CHI 402 - Advanced Classical Chinese II Not offered this year LA

Continuation of CHI 401. Intensive introduction to classical Chinese through the study of selections from ancient texts. Four hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Staff

CHI 403 - Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I Fall

Reading and discussion of selections from Chinese media on contemporary Chinese political, economic, and social issues. Prerequisite: CHI 304 or instructor's permission. Four hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Staff

CHI 404 - Fourth-Year Modern Chinese II Spring

A continuation of 403. Reading and discussion of scholarly writings in the fields of Chinese literature and modern Chinese intellectual history. Four hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite: 403, or instructor's permission. Staff

CHI 405 - Intensive Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I Fall

CHI 405 is an intensive, advanced Chinese class designed for heritage learners. It consists of reading and discussion based on newspaper articles and essays by famous Chinese intellectuals on contemporary Chinese political, economic, and social issues. Students will also study Chinese literary writings. Prerequisite: CHI 306 or instructor's permission. Four hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Staff

CHI 406 - Intensive Fourth-Year Modern Chinese II Spring

Continued reading and discussion of social and cultural challenges China has faced in recent years and various aspects of contemporary Chinese society. Students will also read and discuss substantive issues that modern Chinse intellectuals have faced. Prerequisite: CHI 405 or instructor's permission. Four hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Staff

CHI 411 - Readings in Modern Chinese Intellectual History (also EAS 411) Fall LA

This course is designed for students who have had advanced training in modern Chinese. Readings will focus on modern Chinese intellectual history. Topics will include language reform, women's emancipation, the encounter of western civilization, the rise of communism, etc. Prerequisite: CHI 404/406 or advanced proficiency level in Chinese or instructor's permission. Three hours of class, conducted in Chinese. Staff

CHI 412 - Readings in Classic Chinese Short Stories (also EAS 412) Spring LA

Focuses on reading and discussing selections from Feng Menglong's Sanyan, the most popular and well-known collection of Classic Chinese short stories published in the late sixteenth century. Prerequisite: CHI 404/406 or advanced proficiency level in Chinese or instructor's permission. Staff

CHI 418 - Advanced Chinese: Contemporary Literature and Film Spring LA

This course is designed for students who have learned Chinese for three or more years. The goal is not only to improve student's ability to listen, speak, read and write in Chinese, but also to introduce them to the intellectual and literary development of China after 1949 by sampling literary masterpieces and representative movies. Genres covered in this course include critical essays, short stories, poetry, and visual arts such as posters and film. Through class discussion and writing assignments of formal essays with more advanced vocabulary, students will increase their Chinese skill to a new level. Staff

CHI 452C - Fifth-Year Modern Chinese II in Beijing

A four-week summer intensive language course taught in Beijing, China, at Beijing Normal University, which is a continuation of 451C. Continued readings and discussion on modern Chinese literature, film, and intellectual history. This course, which is designed to bring students to near-native competence in all aspects of modern Chinese, prepares students for advanced research or employment in a variety of China-related fields. Admission by application. Prerequisite: 451C or equivalent. Five two-hour classes, five two-hour drill sessions, plus individual tutorial sessions. Staff